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There are 14 messages totalling 835 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Iran Women Look To Build on Freedoms
2. Iran helicopter crash kills provincial police chief
3. U.S. House approves modified Iran sanctions bill
4. Tehran police chief denies intensifying crackdown
5. Iran refuses to accept deported Egypt Islamists
6. IRNA: first hearing in trial of dormitory incident held
7. Three opposition figures jailed - human rights group (2)
8. Police chief in Jews spy case killed in helicopter crash
9. AP- Iran Supreme Leader Issues Warning
10. Belgian judge orders police probe of charges against Rafsanjani
11. AFP-Student on death row claims he was tortured
12. French cancel Iran film festival
13. FW: dni-disc [DNI-DISC] PROTEST LETTER ON BEHALF OF >>>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2000 09:40:48 EST
From: Iran Man <IRANEHMAN@AOL.COM>
Subject: Iran Women Look To Build on Freedoms

Iran Women Look To Build on Freedoms

By VIJAY JOSHI
.c The Associated Press


TEHRAN, Iran (AP) - For two decades, the billowing black chador has
symbolized the restraints imposed on Iranian women by the religious men who
rule Iran.

But the truth the chador hides is that women in Iran enjoy more freedom than
many of their counterparts in the region who are not allowed to drive, vote
or work. Unlike in many other Muslim countries, women in Iran can hold public
office, preach in mosques and become lawmakers.

Activists hope Iran's new reformist parliament elected Feb. 18, which
includes nine women, will build on these freedoms, rectifying discriminatory
laws. The parliament takes office in June.

``We are not asking for advantage. But we don't want to be disadvantaged
either,'' said Jaleh Shadi-Talab, a social science lecturer at Tehran
University whose research focuses on Iranian women.

``We are expecting some change from the new parliament,'' she said.

Under sharia, or Islamic law, women in Iran still face many restrictions.
They need their husbands' permission to travel or work and can inherit only
half of what their brothers get. Men can divorce their wives at will and are
favored in custody battles. Fathers can legally promise their infant
daughters in marriage and hand them over as brides when they turn 9.

In a court of law, one man's word is worth two women's testimony, and
adultery by women is punishable by stoning to death.

Still, the ruling Islamic clergy has improved women's status, particularly in
education. Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomenei, the late leader of the 1979 Islamic
revolution, decreed it was the ``religious duty'' of every man and woman to
be literate.

Today, about 90 percent of girls enroll in elementary schools. In 1999, about
58 percent of university freshmen were women, compared to 52 percent the
previous year. Many will enter the job market in the next five years and
could change the sex ratio in the work force, currently only 13 percent
female.

``I go wherever I want. I have never felt limited,'' said Rositta Amiri, a
reporter for the Farsi daily, Khorasan. ``Of course there is discrimination,
but a smart lady can get her rights.''

Ironically, authorities attribute the increased participation of women in
public life to the strict Islamic rules enforced after the 1979 Islamic
revolution. The restrictions ended Western freedoms in Tehran and other
Iranian cities and harshly punished any behavior considered threatening to a
woman's chastity.

With the strict laws, men felt more comfortable allowing their daughters and
wives to go out in public, usually in the floor-length chador that covers all
but their hands and face.

The unwieldy garment, which literally means tent, requires constant clutching
by one hand to hold it in place. In restaurants, women are sometimes seen
clenching a corner of the cloth with their teeth while serving themselves
food from a buffet.

In cities, many women have replaced the chador with a gown, known as a
manteau dress, and a head scarf, which also meet the Islamic requirement of
head-to-toe covering, known as hijab.

The head scarves often slide back to show hair, a reflection of the
relaxation in social norms brought by the reform programs of President
Mohammad Khatami, who took office in 1997.

Many women would likely wear the hijab even if it were not the law, as they
do in other Muslim countries. Even moderates, who have come to control the
parliament for the first time since the revolution, are not talking of doing
away with hijab.

``Iran is an Islamic republic that has its own limitations, its norms,'' said
Elaheh Koolaee, the director general of education affairs at Tehran
University and a member of the new parliament.

When the 290-member Majlis, or parliament convenes in June, reformists will
likely face opposition from hard-liners who want only the strictest
interpretation of Islam in applying it to penal and civil codes.

Previous conservative parliaments took only a few steps to give women more
rights: Part-time women workers were given benefits such as pension,
insurance and social security. A 1997 law made the amount a man must pay
during divorce more equitable.

When Khatami took office, he appointed Iran's first women Cabinet member, a
vice president for environment and a presidential adviser. Zahra Eshraqi,
granddaughter of Khomenei and Khatami's sister-in-law, wants that trend to
continue.

``This is year 2000 and the world is progressing. These unnecessary
restrictions on women should be stopped,'' she said.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2000 09:41:36 EST
From: Iran Man <IRANEHMAN@AOL.COM>
Subject: Iran helicopter crash kills provincial police chief

Iran helicopter crash kills provincial police chief


TEHRAN, March 1 (Reuters) - An Iranian provincial police chief was killed
when his military helicopter crashed in southern Iran on Wednesday, state
television reported.

It said the crash, blamed on an unspecified technical fault, killed Fars
province police commander Brigadier-General Youssef Reza Abolfathi and two
passengers.

Five others were injured in the crash, which occurred near the provincial
capital of Shiraz, the television said. It did not specifying the type of
helicopter.

Most of Iran's military and civilian aircraft date back to before the 1979
Islamic revolution. Tehran has been unable to renew its fleet because of U.S.
sanctions and shortages of funds.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2000 09:42:24 EST
From: Iran Man <IRANEHMAN@AOL.COM>
Subject: U.S. House approves modified Iran sanctions bill

U.S. House approves modified Iran sanctions bill


WASHINGTON, March 1 (Reuters) - The U.S. House of Representatives on
Wednesday unanimously approved modified legislation giving President Bill
Clinton the discretion to impose sanctions on Russia or any other country
that helps Iran develop nuclear, chemical or biological weapons.

The House vote of 420-0 follows Senate approval of the bill last week by a
vote of 98-0.

The bill grants the president authority to impose a range of penalties,
including sanctions, on countries that supply technology, equipment or
materiel to Iran for use in its weapons programme. The Senate had modified
the bill to make the imposition of sanctions discretionary instead of
mandatory.

The move reflects U.S. concern that, despite the recent victory of reformists
in Iran's parliamentary elections, Tehran seems unlikely to abandon its quest
to develop long-range missiles capable of carrying nuclear and chemical
warheads.

The legislation is aimed chiefly at prodding the White House toward a more
aggressive stance on Russian weapons proliferation following intelligence
reports that Russian scientists, academics and companies are the top
suppliers of weapons technology to Iran.

Last October the House approved the same bill, containing slightly different
provisions, in a vote of 419-0.

The bill now goes to President Clinton to be signed into law. Clinton vetoed
a similar measure in 1988 and had threatened to do the same this time.
Congressional leaders noted, however, that the overwhelming votes in both
chambers were sufficient to override a presidential veto.

``I'm confident that the unanimous passage in both houses will convince the
president to reconsider his threat to veto this legislation,'' said
Republican Representative Benjamin Gilman of New York, chairman of the House
International Relations Committee.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2000 09:44:07 EST
From: Iran Man <IRANEHMAN@AOL.COM>
Subject: Tehran police chief denies intensifying crackdown

Tehran police chief denies intensifying crackdown

By Ali Raiss-Tousi


TEHRAN, March 2 (Reuters) - Tehran's police chief denied on Thursday that
``morals squads'' have begun a new crackdown against young people and
satellite television dishes, saying police were simply on increased alert for
thieves and criminals.

``Our increased presence is, in principle, to deal with thieves and common
criminals... Concerning social vices, no new measures have been taken, we are
just continuing the old trend,'' Brigadier General Mohsen Ansari told
Reuters.

``Nobody must openly insult the religious values of society. We are just
continuing to carry out our duties, this is nothing new,'' he said.

Ansari's comments follow reports that morals squads have stepped up
enforcement of Iran's strict social codes and the ban on satellite dishes, in
what is widely seen as a hardline response to reformists' victory in
parliamentary polls.

In a series of seemingly coordinated actions in the days since the February
18 vote, police and units of the Islamic Basij militia have stepped up raids
on apartment blocks in search of satellite receivers.

They have hauled young men and women from restaurants, cafes and shopping
malls, accusing them of violating Islamic dress codes or fraternising with
the opposite sex.

The raids have been centred in affluent north Tehran, a hot-bed of reformist
sentiment, prompting residents to see the hands of the defeated conservatives
behind the crackdown.

But newspapers reported 42 young men and women were sentenced to 35 lashes
each after morals police raided a dance party in the southern city of Shiraz.

The owner of the house where the party was held was fined 100 million rials
($12,300).

In the plush Mahmoudieh district of Tehran, residents said police units moved
in last week to seize satellite dishes and receivers without search warrants.

But the police chief said all legal procedures must be followed.

``Private homes may not be entered without police showing judicial warrants
and also their identification cards,'' Ansari said.

The leading pro-reform coalition, elected on a platform of greater social,
cultural and political freedoms, has promised a repeal of the ban on
satellite dishes and an end to state interference in citizens' private lives.

($1- 8149 rials at the stock exchange)

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2000 09:45:00 EST
From: Iran Man <IRANEHMAN@AOL.COM>
Subject: Iran refuses to accept deported Egypt Islamists

Iran refuses to accept deported Egypt Islamists

By Esmat Salaheddin


CAIRO, March 2 (Reuters) - Germany tried to deport two asylum-seeking
Egyptian Islamists to Iran this week, but Iranian authorities refused to
accept them, an Egyptian Islamist in Europe said.

The two men, jailed in the 1980s for their alleged part in the 1981
assassination Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, were reputed to be leaders of
Egypt's largest militant group, al-Gama'a al-Islamiya (Islamic Group)

Osama Rushdi told Reuters by telephone that the two men and their families
were put on a flight from Frankfurt to Tehran on Wednesday, escorted by five
German officers.

They were not allowed into Iran and were returned on the same plane, he said.
They were now back in Frankfurt airport, where thay have been held for more
than a month.

German officials declined to comment on Thursday.

Germany's highest court last week upheld a decision to deport Abdel Akher
Hammad and Mohieddin Ahmed, but ordered them not to be handed to Egypt.

Hammad, 45, with his wife and five children, and Ahmed, 40, with his wife and
a son, arrived in Frankfurt on January 26. They asked for asylum, but their
request was rejected by the Interior Ministry and an administrative court.

Military and state security courts in Egypt have sentenced more than 90
people to death since militant groups like al-Gama'a took up arms against the
state in 1992. About 70 have been executed.

About 1,200 people, mostly militants and police, were killed in the struggle
for a purist Islamic state, but the violence has virtually stopped since the
1997 Luxor massacre of 58 foreign tourists and four Egyptians by Gama'a
gunmen.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2000 19:22:46 -0500
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@PANJERE.NET>
Subject: IRNA: first hearing in trial of dormitory incident held

thr 030
dormitory-trial
first hearing in trial of dormitory incident held
tehran, feb. 29, irna -- the first hearing in the trial of those
accused of forcible entry into a tehran university dormitory and
other offenses against its occupants in early july last year was held
here tuesday morning.
presiding over the session, head of branch 7 of tehran's
military court, hojatoleslam seyed ahmad tabatabaei, expressed hope
that the proceedings will merit god's approval and lead to a
restoration of rights.
deputy tehran military prosecutor houshang eqbal then read
out the indictments and named the 20 persons accused in the dormitory
incident as follows:
1- (irgc) brigadier-general farhad nazari, former commander of
tehran's law enforcement forces
2- colonel jamshid khodabakhshi, commander of irgc special unit
3- farhad arjmandi, commander of special squad
4- captain ramin nazari, deputy commander of squad
5- lieutenant orujali badrzadeh
6- sergeant jamshid dalvand
7- sergeant seyed hussein ahmadi
8- sergeant hassan ahmadi
9- sergeant ali akbar jadidi
10-sergeant qobad mahdian
11-sergeant fathollah moradian
accused numbers 4 to 11 are all personnel of the irgc special
unit or the special squad.
names of remaining nine accused have not been disclosed except
that they are privates in the law enforcement forces.
eqbal specified the charges against the first-named accused:
issuing an order to attack the tehran university dormitory,
cancelling of order and inciting disobedience against the country's
law enforcement forces.
charges against the second to the 20th-named accused were
specified by the court as forcible entry of the dormitory,
physical injuries (beating) and causing injury to dormitory
occupants.
according to eqbal, the 5th-named accused is also charged with
theft of an electric shaving machine.
the deputy tehran military prosecutor, while noting the
applicability of the penal codes to crimes cognizable by the armed
forces, called for the application of the appropriate punishment on
all the accused who may be proven guilty.
he emphasized that entry into a university dormitory required
prior permission.
during the course of the session, the presiding judge said
that of a total of 397 plaintiffs, 18 have reported to the court and
received certificates from the coroner's office, adding that their
complaints are now official.
judicial representatives of the law enforcement forces who
attended the session were hussein ali abuei, mohammad ansari, colonel
hadi khorramshahi, colonel ahmad mohaqqeqi and captain sirous alahi.
sina karimian, hussein mir-afzal and hojatoleslam mohsen rahami
are the attorneys for the plaintiffs.
in the course of the session, rahami said that although the
acts of the law enforcement forces were not concealed to the
public, this fact could not bar an investigation into any
wrongdoing that others may have committed.
in addition to the illegal entry made by the law enforcement
personnel into the dormitory, rahami said the accused set ablaze
several rooms, destroyed students' belongings and threw out a student
from the third floor.
he said even the section for foreign students was not immune
to the attack as some of the students were beaten and injured, and
were later forced to take refuge in their respective embassies.
the unfortunate incident, rahami said, destroyed the image of
the islamic republic both inside and outside the country.
moreover, he said that the file on this dormitory incident
ntains writs to prosecute certain individuals while prohibiting
others, cases which have been the subject of protest.
he said that according to what nazari had said before the attack,
he (nazari) had predicted the incident and, therefore, it may safely
be concluded that the attack on the dormitory was pre-arranged and
was waiting only for an excuse to justify it.
an issue, rahami said, has been raised, i.e., how the cases of
assault committed by civilian elements on the university and the
consequent beating and injuries inflicted on the students would be
investigated.
he said there were some people who coordinated the civilian
elements to work with the military forces and had dispatched them to
the dormitory, adding that this is an issue which the prosecutor
should pay careful attention to.
addressing the accused, the students' attorney asked whether
they could name any conspirator, anti-system or radical element among
those who had been beaten and injured.
pointing to alleged arrangements made between nazari and one of
his superiors respecting the attack at the time that it occurred,
rahami said it is not yet clear who that superior is and what
orders he gave.
but he said there was a coordinating center active behind the
dormitory incident which created a crisis within the system.
"in less than 24 hours after the incident, 204 students were
arrested, some of whom were beaten," he said, adding that if
officials in charge of the dormitory and the islamic association had
failed to interfere the incident would have had worse consequences.
he asked for the severest punishment for the accused, adding
that the crimes of destruction to property, manslaughter and serious
physical injuries require that the punishment provided by law be
be meted out on all offenders.
the trial, the first on this case, concluded at noon tuesday with
an announcement by the trial judge that the next hearing will be on
march 4.
ns/ls/ks
end
::irna 29/02/2000 13:39

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2000 20:47:24 -0500
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@PANJERE.NET>
Subject: Three opposition figures jailed - human rights group

Three opposition figures jailed - human rights group
France - Thursday, 02 March 2000 - Agence France Presse

PARIS, March 2 (AFP) - Three leaders of one of the main secular
opposition groups in Iran, the Iranian nation party, have been sentenced
to long prison terms, the League for the Defense of Human Rights in Iran
(LDDHI) said Thursday.

The group said a court in Teheran had sent Bahram Namazi, 65, Khosrow
Seyf, 68, and Farzine Mokhber, 58, to prison for between 13 and 15 years
for "illegal political activities and anti-government propaganda."

The men were arrested in July 1999 after student demonstrations in
Teheran and held in Evin prison before being tried on an unknown date,
the group said.

The Iranian nation party was headed by Dariush Foruhar, a minister in
the early days of the Islamic republic, who was assassinated with his
wife in Teheran in November 1998.

The LDDHI said it is "extremely concerned about the conditions in which
the (sentences) were handed down and demands the immediate and
unconditional release of the three men, who are prisoners of
conscience."

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2000 20:49:33 -0500
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@PANJERE.NET>
Subject: Police chief in Jews spy case killed in helicopter crash

Iran - Thursday, 02 March 2000 - Agence France Presse

TEHRAN, March 2 (AFP) - The police chief of the southern Iranian city of
Shiraz, who ordered the arrest of 13 Jews and eight Muslims facing trial
on charges of spying for Israel and the United States, was killed in a
helicopter crash Wednesday, press reports said Thursday.

General Yussef-Reza Abdolfathi was on an anti-bandit mission with other
officers when the helicopter came down for unspecified reasons near
Shiraz, the reports said.

Two other officers were killed, while the pilot and four more passengers
were hurt.

Abdolfathi was posted to Shiraz as a punishment for his brutalities in
Tehran in suppressing criminality and political protests. In 1997 he was
instrumental in the prosecution of an Afghan refugee he branded "the
vampire of Tehran".

Gholamreza Khosro Kuran Kordieh, 28, was convicted of murder and rape
and hanged before a large crowd on August 13, 1997, after being given
241 lashes.

His death came the day it was announced that the trial of the Jews,
which has caused international unease, would take place on April 13.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2000 20:50:10 -0500
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@PANJERE.NET>
Subject: AP- Iran Supreme Leader Issues Warning

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) - Iran's supreme leader warned today against
``political bickering'' as government media announced a partial recount
from recent legislative elections in which reformists scored an
impressive win.

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Iran's highest authority, said the elections -
in which reformists intent on loosening strict religious rule won 170
seats in the 290-member parliament - had distracted the government.

``Those engaged in political bickering that raises tensions should stop
right now and get on with the basic work at hand,'' Khamenei said in a
speech broadcast by state radio. ``These were all election rows, and the
election is over.''

``These divisions, these differences, these (verbal) attacks, these
false accusations should stop, especially among parliament deputies and
officials, who should get on with the work of the government and the
people,'' said Khamenei, who sides with the hard-liners.

Authorities ordered the recounting of a large number of votes cast in
Tehran in the Feb. 18 polls to ``dispel anxiety'' about possible
counting errors, the official Islamic Republic News Agency reported.

It said the recounting would be held over the next five days in the
presence of observers from the Interior Ministry and the Guardians
Council, which supervises elections. It was not clear if that would
change the final result.

Reformists allied to President Mohammad Khatami won the top 29 positions
in a slate of 30 seats allotted to Tehran.

The 30th seat was won by former President Hashemi Rafsanjani, a once
popular leader who fared dismally because of his increased association
with hard-liners. The recounting apparently was due to complaints by a
candidate who finished 31st.

Some reformist groups suspect that Rafsanjani is being forced into the
Majlis, or parliament, as a first step by hard-liners who want him as
the speaker. Hard-liners and conservatives won 45 seats in parliament
and 10 were taken by independents. The remaining 65 will be decided in
run-offs.

In the run-up to the polls, the hard-liners did everything they could to
prevent a reformist victory, including the disqualification of some of
the reformers by a hard-line vetting council.

State television quoted Ayatollah Gholamreza Rezvani, the head of the
Election Supervisory Board of the Guardians Council, as saying that
``numerous complaints'' and ``a big number of violations'' were reported
from the elections. He did not give details.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2000 20:52:02 -0500
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@PANJERE.NET>
Subject: Belgian judge orders police probe of charges against Rafsanjani

Belgium - Thursday, 02 March 2000 - Agence France Presse

BRUSSELS, March 2 (AFP) - A Belgian judge has ordered police to
investigate allegations that former Iranian president Ali Akbar Hashemi
Rafsanjani is guilty of crimes against humanity, officials said
Thursday.

Judge Damien Vandermeersch order the probe in response to a complaint
filed February 10 by an Iranian-born Belgian national, the Brussels
prosecutor's office said.

The complaint accused Rafsanjani of being responsible for kidnappings,
torture, harassment and psychological violence perpetrated between April
1983 and February 1989 in Tehran and two other Iranian cities.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2000 20:51:01 -0500
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@PANJERE.NET>
Subject: AFP-Student on death row claims he was tortured

Iran - Wednesday, 01 March 2000 - Agence France Presse

TEHRAN, March 1 (AFP) - An Iranian student facing execution for his part
in the violent unrest of last July claimed Wednesday he had been
tortured and ill-treated in prison since his arrest.

"I was hit with an electric cable, hung up by a rope and violently
beaten," Akbar Mohammadi said in a letter to judiciary chief Mahmud
Hashemi-Shahrudi published in a number of reformist newspapers.

Mohammadi also said he had gone deaf in his right ear, lost two nails on
his left foot and suffered from kidney pain.

"The prison doctor ordered me to hospital but up until now I have not
been taken there and I continue to suffer," he said.

The press reports said the undated letter was written from cell 93 of
block 209 in Tehran's notorious Evin jail and sent to Mohammadi's family
at Amol in northern Iran, who decided to make it public.

Mohammadi was the only one of three students sentenced to death in the
wake of the unrest sparked by a police raid on a student dormitory at
Tehran university to have the verdict confirmed by the courts.

Identified by press photographs, he was found guilty of throwing Molotov
cocktails at the security forces at the university on July 9. His only
recourse now is to seek an amnesty from Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah
Ali Khamenei.

Mohammadi's brother Manucher, who was portrayed as a ringleader of the
disturbances, was jailed for ten years. The two other students sentenced
to death had their sentences commuted to ten years and two-and-a-half
years.

On Tuesday 20 policemen went on trial in a military court here Tuesday
for their role in quelling the student protest which set off the worst
unrest in Iran in some 20 years.

The 11 officers and nine men, including former Tehran police chief
Farhad Nazari, were charged with assaulting students at the dormitory
complex. Nazari was accused of ordering in the police against the orders
of the interior ministry.

The students had been demonstrating over the closure by the
conservative-dominated courts of the reformist daily newspaper Salam.

Three people were killed in Tehran, including an off-duty policeman said
to be sleeping in the dormitory when his colleagues burst in, and the
northwestern city of Tabriz in six days of rioting, according to an
official tally.

Pro-reform newspapers at the time said at least five people had been
killed and dozens wounded, many of whom they said were later abducted
from Tehran hospitals by the secret police.

The rioting was only halted with the violent intervention of the Basiji,
Iran's volunteer Islamist militia.

A total of 1,500 demonstrators were arrested in the capital, many of
them picked up by the Basiji. Around 500 were later released, while the
remainder are still being questioned or prosecuted or have already been
convicted.

The contrast between the slowness of the court martial of the police and
the speed with which the courts prosecuted and convicted student
demonstrators sparked criticism from reformers here.

The US State Department in its annual report on human rights around the
world published last Friday, said Iran was guilty of "systematic
abuses," including widespread use of torture and harsh prison
conditions.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2000 20:51:24 -0500
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@PANJERE.NET>
Subject: French cancel Iran film festival

An Iranian film festival in France has been called off after anonymous
threats were received from abroad.

The head of the cinematheque in Nice, where the month-long festival was
due to have been held, Odile Chapel said that she believed it was better
to cancel the event rather than risk the possibility of violence.

The festival scheduled for March 7 to April 2, was to have screened
about thirty Iranian films, including a special tribute to the director
Abbas Kiarostami, who won the Golden Palm at the Cannes Film Festival in
1997.

From the newsroom of the BBC World Service

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2000 21:30:52 -0500
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@PANJERE.NET>
Subject: Re: Three opposition figures jailed - human rights group

Hi,
I think we start to see what our friends in Iran mean by "hokumat-e qanun",
first they aprove the death penalty of student activists, then they start
attacking people and and now this.

I wonder how our so called reformist leaders are acting against this? Are
we going to see as many publication about these people as we saw for Nouri?
Or Karbaschi? how about all those "iran-lover" organization such as IIC and
other anti-descrimination groups? Amazingly, our people are doing the same
stupid mistake they did in 79, they put their fait in the hand of those
who's only interest in to fool them and stay in controll of our country!

It is a good indication what "our" leaders mean by "hokumat-e qanun"! It is
only those who stay in the limited definition of what IRI has approved who
can be free to talk and not anyone else. These guys only crime is that they
love their country and are willing to do what ever they can to save it.

Shame, thats the only thing I can say!
/Farhad
At 08:47 PM 3/2/00 -0500, you wrote:
>Three opposition figures jailed - human rights group
>France - Thursday, 02 March 2000 - Agence France Presse
>
>PARIS, March 2 (AFP) - Three leaders of one of the main secular
>opposition groups in Iran, the Iranian nation party, have been sentenced
>to long prison terms, the League for the Defense of Human Rights in Iran
>(LDDHI) said Thursday.
>
>The group said a court in Teheran had sent Bahram Namazi, 65, Khosrow
>Seyf, 68, and Farzine Mokhber, 58, to prison for between 13 and 15 years
>for "illegal political activities and anti-government propaganda."
>
>The men were arrested in July 1999 after student demonstrations in
>Teheran and held in Evin prison before being tried on an unknown date,
>the group said.
>
>The Iranian nation party was headed by Dariush Foruhar, a minister in
>the early days of the Islamic republic, who was assassinated with his
>wife in Teheran in November 1998.
>
>The LDDHI said it is "extremely concerned about the conditions in which
>the (sentences) were handed down and demands the immediate and
>unconditional release of the three men, who are prisoners of
>conscience."
>
>

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Mar 2000 19:22:35 -0800
From: Mo Sa'lemy <mosalem@HOME.COM>
Subject: FW: dni-disc [DNI-DISC] PROTEST LETTER ON BEHALF OF >>>

again can w discuss this, or were just here to ruber stamp khatami's reforms
and reformers?

mo-
----------
From: "Mo Sa'lemy" <mosalem@HOME.COM>
To: DNI-DISC@D-N-I.ORG
Subject: dni-disc [DNI-DISC] PROTEST LETTER ON BEHALF OF >>>
Date: Tue, Feb 29, 2000, 11:18 PM


this is something to protest koroush:

why dont we denounce this reaction, why not hold reformers responsible for
their slogans in the elections?

mo-



----------
>From: Iran Man <IRANEHMAN@AOL.COM>
>To: DNI-NEWS@D-N-I.ORG
>Subject: [DNI-NEWS] Iran's morals squads crack down after polls
>Date: Tue, Feb 29, 2000, 3:25 AM
>

> Iran's morals squads crack down after polls
>
> By Jonathan Lyons
>
>
> TEHRAN, Feb 29 (Reuters) - Iran's morals squads have gone on the warpath
> against illegal satellite dishes and free-spirited young people in what is
> widely seen as a hardline response to the reformists' victory at the polls.
>
> In a series of seemingly coordinated actions in the days since the February
> 18 polls, police and units of the Islamic Basij militia have stepped up raids
> on apartment blocks in search of satellite receivers.
>
> They have also hauled young men and women from restaurants, cafes and
> shopping malls, accusing them of violating the strict Islamic dress codes or
> fraternising with the opposite sex.
>
> The raids have been centred in affluent north Tehran, a hot- bed of reformist
> sentiment, prompting residents to see the hands of the defeated conservatives
> behind the crackdown.
>
> Feeding those fears was an open call for revenge attacks on Tehran's middle
> class, many of whom voted for broad reform within the existing Islamic
> system.
>
> ``Our brothers in the Basij and police...must increase their moral, social
> and cultural enforcement and carry out Islamic punishments precisely, so the
> middle class feels fed up and believes the reformists are incompetent,''
> proclaimed the hardline Jebheh magazine.
>
> ``This violence must not be turned into a perpetual daily event but must take
> place on special days with full force, swiftly and surely.''
>
> SATELLITE BAN TARGETED BY REFORMERS
>
> The leading pro-reform coalition, led by President Mohammad Khatami's
> brother, coasted to victory on a platform of expanded social, cultural and
> political freedoms.
>
> Among their promises were repeal of the ban on satellite dishes, barred under
> strict regulations to shut out foreign cultural influence, and an end to
> state interference in citizens' private lives.
>
> But at the up-scale Golestan shopping mall, teeming with young people,
> shoppers said police harassment had picked up since the elections, in which
> reformers won 29 of Tehran's 30 seats in the next parliament.
>
> ``I was arrested last week,'' said Youssi, sitting in a cafe with three
> classmates. ``Three soldiers in camouflage took me to a back alley and
> searched me. They hit me when I protested.''
>
> Along Jordan Avenue residents said plain-clothes units late last week moved
> in to seize satellite TV systems.
>
> ``They went door to door in our apartment building, searching for dishes and
> taking them all away,'' one resident told Reuters.
>
> Similar raids were reported at the weekend in other neighbourhoods.
>
> An Italian restaurant popular with young people was also raided, and dozens
> of young men and women were carted away in police wagons.
>
> ``One minute we were eating, and the next the police were there,'' said one
> witness, who was dining with his wife and children. ``They took them all
> away.''
>
> Manager Tahmesab Ehiapour said on Monday night he had taken pains to ensure
> that boys and the girls, most of them there for a classmate's birthday party,
> sat at separate tables. But police detained him, too, before a judge set him
> free with a fine.
>
> Such raids had become less common in recent months, as the gradual
> liberalisation under President Khatami took root.
>
> But the heightened tensions of the election campaign saw Iran's deep
> factional divisions increasingly cast in cultural terms.
>
> Conservative seminarians in the holy Shi'ite Moslem city of Qom held
> pre-election rallies to condemn Khatami's cultural polices and demand renewed
> restrictions on the press, while hardline candidates warned of a threat to
> Iran's Islamic values.

------------------------------

End of DNI-NEWS Digest - 1 Mar 2000 to 2 Mar 2000
*************************************************