Date: Nov 24, 1998 [ 0: 0: 1]

Subject: DNI-NEWS Digest - 22 Nov 1998 to 23 Nov 1998

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Subject: DNI-NEWS Digest - 22 Nov 1998 to 23 Nov 1998
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There are 9 messages totalling 433 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. BBC: Lucky escape from execution
2. Jomhuri Eslami on Foruhar' assasination: jnayt mHkvm ast
3. Judge urges fast arrests in Iran opposition murder
4. Exile Bani-Sadr says Iran killed opposition leader
5. IRNA: Foruhar murdered by pressure groups affiliated to zionists
6. Iranian opposition group denounces member's arrest
7. Iran reduces number of embassies in cash saving drive
8. Iranian officials, newspapers condemns murder of opposition leader
9. Iranian leader rules out relations with US, Iran's "number one enemy"

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 10:38:10 +0100
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad.abdolian@RSA.ERICSSON.SE>
Subject: BBC: Lucky escape from execution

Sunday, November 22, 1998 Published at 19:43 GMT
World: Middle East

Lucky escape from execution

Under Islamic law adultery is punishable by stoning

By Iranian affairs reporter Sadeq Saba

An Iranian man condemned to death by stoning was acquitted after he
managed to free himself as the sentence was being carried out.

The man, Khosrow Ebrahimi from the town of Lahijan in northern Iran, was
convicted of adultery last week.

Under Iran's Islamic law, adultery is punishable by stoning to death,
but the condemned person is acquitted if he or she manages to survive
the hail of stones.

Mr Ebrahimi was buried to his waist in sand and covered with a white
sheet. Local people started throwing specially selected stones at him.

The law says stones used should not be so large that a person dies in a
single blow, nor so small as to be ineffectual.

But the convicted man was lucky. He survived the hail of stones and used
the strength of his body to extricate himself from the ground.

The prosecuting judge said later that the man was acquitted in
accordance with the law because he managed to free himself as the
sentence was being carried out.

Others less fortunate

But other convicted adulterers in Iran have been less fortunate.

Iranian newspapers have reported that during the past year at least four
women and three men have been stoned to death.

Opposition sources say that the true numbers of stonings are much higher
and they are not reported because of possible bad publicity.

A government spokesman has recently suggested that in order to forestall
international media coverage, stoning should be carried out in private.

But international human rights organisations have repeatedly condemned
the practice as barbaric and urged Iran to stop it entirely.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 15:37:01 +0100
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad.abdolian@RSA.ERICSSON.SE>
Subject: Jomhuri Eslami on Foruhar' assasination: jnayt mHkvm ast

Hi,
This was found on their homepage at:
http://www.neda.net/j-eslami/020977/news4.htm

=begin=
Smarh 0465 dvSnbh 2 AZr 7731


jnayt mHkvm ast
eCr dyrvz aelam Sd daryvS frvhr vhmsr vy dr Kanh
mskvny Kvd dr thran bh qtl rsydhand.hrGnd hnvz elt ayn jnayt
mSKC nSdh, lkn trdydy nyst kh ayn aqdam zSt bh hr dlyl kh
baSd mHkvm ast.ayn aqdam qTea tvsT dSmnan mlt v ba hdf
KdShdar krdn bh Ghrh nXam jmhvry aslamy Cvrt grfth ast.
daryvS frvhr, dr eyn Hal kh bh envan yk mKalf syasy dr
jameh fealyt daSt vly hrks vaz jmlh mKalfyn, ayn Hq ra darnd
kh nXrat Kvd ra dr GarGvb qanvn abraz knnd vbTvr Tbyey dr mvard
tKlf, brKvrd ba Anan nyz bayd dr GarGvb qanvn baSd.
dstgahhay rsmy hnvz aTlaeaty kh nSan dhndh angyzh qtl
baSd, mntSr nkrdhand vmelvm nyst qatlan, Gh ksany hstnd vayn
aqdam zSt ra ba Gh angyzhay anjam dadhand.az msivlan amnyty
vqxaiy ayn antXar vjvd dard kh ba pygyry mvxve, qatlan ra
dstgyr v mjazat nmaynd vafkar emvmy ra dr jryan amr qrar dhnd.
=end=

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 19:38:58 +0100
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad.abdolian@RSA.ERICSSON.SE>
Subject: Judge urges fast arrests in Iran opposition murder

Judge urges fast arrests in Iran opposition murder 09:58 a.m. Nov 23,
1998 Eastern

TEHRAN, Nov 23 (Reuters) - Iran's judiciary chief, Ayatollah Mohammad
Yazdi, on Monday called for the prompt arrest of those responsible for
stabbing to death a veteran opposition figure and his wife, the Iranian
news agency IRNA reported.

``The judiciary head expressed regret over the killing of Dariush
Forouhar and his wife and ordered the prompt identification and
punishment of the perpetrators,'' IRNA said.

Police said no motive had been established yet in the deaths of Forouhar
and his wife Parvaneh, who were outspoken critics of Iran's Islamic
government.

Newspapers quoted witnesses as saying the couple apparently knew their
attackers, who arrived at their house with flowers and sweets.

Forouhar's body was found behind a desk in his office with a knife
thrust into his heart, while his wife was killed in the same manner
elsewhere in the house, the daily Iran quoted a witness as saying.

The Interior Ministry said earlier the bodies were found on Sunday
afternoon, but that the two had died hours earlier.

Forouhar, 70, and his wife, 58, often criticised alleged violations of
human and political rights in interviews with Farsi programmes beamed to
Iran by Western radio stations.

Forouhar was the leader of the small nationalist Iran Nation Party. The
illegal but tolerated group has a newsletter which often carries
exclusive reports of alleged rights violations.

The secular group had called for a boycott of last month's nationwide
elections for a powerful clerical assembly, saying democratic elections
were impossible in Iran today.

Forouhar was one of the few old-time opposition leaders who had not gone
into exile and had continued to speak out in Iran.

He spent several years in jail during the rule of the late Shah Mohammad
Reza Pahlavi, then briefly joined Islamic forces and served as labour
minister in the first government after the 1979 revolution which toppled
the monarchy.

But he went into opposition after hardline followers of the late
revolutionary leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini consolidated their hold
on power.

Forouhar was a close associate of the late Prime Minister Mehdi
Bazargan, whose liberal Islamist cabinet served for nine months after
the revolution. In the 1950s, he was an ally of the late nationalist
leader Mohammad Mossadeq.

A number of prominent exiled Iranian opposition figures have been
assassinated since 1979. Iran has denied involvement, blaming the
slayings on infighting among dissidents. Killings of opposition leaders
inside the country have been rare.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 19:40:19 +0100
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad.abdolian@RSA.ERICSSON.SE>
Subject: Exile Bani-Sadr says Iran killed opposition leader

Exile Bani-Sadr says Iran killed opposition leader 06:32 a.m. Nov 23,
1998 Eastern

PARIS, Nov 23 (Reuters) - Exiled former Iranian President Abolhassan
Bani-Sadr on Monday blamed the Iranian authorities for the brutal
killing of an outspoken opposition leader and his wife in Tehran.

``The Western governments that unhesitatingly declared that the regime
had put an end to totalitarianism, to violence and to political killings
must now explain to the public why they lied,'' Bani-Sadr said.

``In killing Dariush and Parvaneh Forouhar, this bloody regime hopes to
kill the hope of seeing democracy in our country, but this has only
reinforced our determination in this righteous combat,'' he said in a
statement issued from his home in exile in Versailles, near Paris.

Tehran police said on Sunday that Dariush Forouhar, former labour
minister and head of the small nationalist Iran Nation Party, and his
wife Parvaneh had been stabbed to death at their home in Tehran.

Forouhar and his wife often criticised alleged violations of human and
political rights in statements and interviews with Farsi-language
programmes beamed to Iran by Western radios.

The Iran Nation Party, which publishes a weekly newsletter critical of
the government, had called for a boycott of last month's nationwide
elections for a powerful clerical assembly, saying the polls were
undemocratic.

Forouhar, who spent many years in jail during the rule of the late Shah
Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, who served as labour minister in the first
government after the 1979 Islamic revolution which toppled the shah.

Bani-Sadr, elected Iran's first president after the 1979 revolution,
went into exile in France in 1981

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 19:41:58 +0100
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad.abdolian@RSA.ERICSSON.SE>
Subject: IRNA: Foruhar murdered by pressure groups affiliated to zionists

thr 047
foruhar-rezaie
rezaie: foruhar murdered by pressure groups affiliated to zionists
zanjan, nov. 23, irna -- expediency council secretary major general
mohsen rezaie said here on monday that without a doubt, pressure
groups, affiliated to the zionists, are behind the murder of (former
labor minister) daryoush foruhar.
foruhar and his wife were stabbed to death at their home in
tehran on sunday by unknown persons.
rezaie, participating in a question and answer session with
students of zanjan university, said: ''the zionists find a number
of persons who cannot do anything and then liquidate them in a bid
to create problems in our political community.''
''our friends can most probably reach the same conclusion if try
to do so,'' said rezaie.
under a despotic environment, such problems can happen less
often because of military purges and enforcement of tough
regulations and there are no or a few such pressure groups, commented
rezaie.
''absolutely, pressure groups are acting against our revolution,
ur nation and our causes and those who are after such things either
lack logic or wants to deviate us from the path we have chosen,''
noted rezaie.
however, rezaie said that the number of pressure groups has
considerably dropped since eight or nine months ago.
bg/rr
end
::irna 23/11/98 19:08

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 00:19:52 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iranian opposition group denounces member's arrest

TEHRAN, Nov 22 (AFP) - Iran's outlawed but tolerated opposition
group, the Freedom Movement of Iran (FMI), called Sunday for
President Mohammad Khatami to intervene over the arrest of one of
its members.
Ali Asghar Gharavi was seized in Isfahan in central Iran during
weekly Friday prayers at the home of his father, prominent Ayatollah
Mohammad Javad Gharavi, the FMI said in a statement.
Gharavi was described as a senior member of the FMI, which
groups generally liberal academics and former ministers of the
Islamic republic.
The FMI said he was arrested under a warrant issued by a
powerful court which deals with criminal offences committed by
clerics, but it did not give any reasons for the arrest.
Ali Ghofrani, another associate of Ayatollah Gharavi, was
arrested in Naeen, east of Isfahan, the FMI said in an open letter
to Khatami, urging the president to order the men's release.
The FMI, officially illegal but grudgingly tolerated by the
Islamic government, was founded in the 1960s by Mehdi Bazargan who
was briefly Iran's prime minister following the 1979 Islamic
revolution.
The movement is currently headed by Ibrahim Yazdi, a former
foreign minister and revolutionary firebrand turned liberal
dissident.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 00:20:09 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran reduces number of embassies in cash saving drive

TEHRAN, Nov 22 (AFP) - Iran, whose economy has been hard hit by
collapsing oil prices, is cutting back on the number of its
embassies abroad in an effort to save money, newspapers reported
here Sunday.
The foreign ministry will close its missions in Burkina Faso,
Gabon, Mozambique, Sierra Leone and Tanzania, where Iran has minimal
economic interests, the English-language Tehran Times said.
Other missions targeted for closure are the embassies in Brunei
and Nicaragua, the consulates in Munich and Shanghai and an unnamed
mission in "northern Afghanistan."
Other embassies that were not named are set to cut staff, though
Iran is due to open an embassy in Hong Kong.
Iran's major source of revenue is the sale of oil, but as crude
prices have hit their lowest levels in 12 years, the government is
faced with a 6.3 billion dollar budget deficit this year.
President Mohammad Khatami recently asked government bodies to
"curtail expenses" while the foreign ministry has often been
criticised for costing far more money than it helps generate.
The government recently ordered its embassies to pay greater
attention to commercial issues and work at facilitating non-oil
exports, a decision the weekly paper Kayhan Havai described as "too
little, too late."
The foreign ministry recently announced it will send its first
batch of commercial attaches abroad in a bid to increase the
nation's non-oil exports. Oil exports currently account for 80
percent of Iran's hard currency revenues.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 00:20:23 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iranian officials, newspapers condemns murder of opposition leader

TEHRAN, Nov 23 (AFP) - Iranian officials and newspapers on
Monday condemned the murder of an ultra-nationalist opposition
leader, saying it was a blow to the image of the Islamic regime.
Daryoush Foruhar, the head of the Iranian Nation's Party (INP)
and a former labour minister, and his wife, Parvaneh, were stabbed
to death by unknown assailants in their home here on Sunday
evening.
Police have launched a manhunt for the killers.
The interior ministry issued a statement expressing regret over
the killings and said it had launched an "extensive" investigation
into the case.
Several newspapers also condemned the act.
"Foruhar is being murdered at a time when the country more than
ever needs calm and to believe the humane face of Mr. Khatami's
government," said the government daily Iran, referring to President
Mohammad Khatami.
"The police and the judiciary must do their utmost to clarify
the case," it said.
Even the hardline Jomhuri Islami, which was sharply critical of
Foruhar's views, slammed the "ugly act."
"No matter what motivated it, this is an ugly act and must be
condemned," it said. "This act is definitely taken by the enemies of
the people with the aim of damaging the image of the Islamic
regime."
"It is true that Foruhar was a dissident. But even dissidents
have a right to voice their views within the law. And when they
break the law, they should be dealt with within the framework of the
law," the paper added.
Iran News called the murders an "abhorant crime," while another
English-language daily, the Tehran Times, accused the Iraq-based
armed opposition, People's Mujahedeen, of being responsible for the
killings.
Foruhar, in his early 70s, had been an outspoken critic of the
regime, accusing it of being undemocratic. He gave regular
interviews to the Persian-language services of overseas radios.
A longtime prisoner of the Shah, he served as minister of labour
in the interim government of Mehdi Bazargan who became prime
minister after the 1979 Islamic revolution.
The transitional government was ousted after eight months and
Foruhar has since been campaigning against the government.
Observers described Foruhar's murder as a severe blow to the
secular opposition, which is already under mounting pressure from
the regime.
Like other liberal and nationalist movements, the INP is banned
but tolerated with activities limited to issuing statements, holding
small private gatherings and having its leaders speak to foreign
radios.
On Friday, two members of the liberal Islamic Iran's Freedom
Movement were arrested in Esfahan, central Iran.
And a liberal personality, Ezatollah Sahabi,will stand trail on
Monday, charged with printing lies and insults against the armed
forces and provoking public disturbances.
Iranian leaders generally villify liberal movements, branding
them as allies of Western powers bent on undermining the Islamic
regime.
Foruhar was renowned for his strong nationalist sentiments and
his abhorrence of the influence of Arab and Islamic culture in
Iran.
Formerly the leader of the Pan-Iranist movement, he had forged
close alliance with dissidents from non-Persian ethnic groups in
Iran, notably the Kurds which have a history of struggle for
autonomy.
His murder bears a shocking similarity to the assassination a
decade ago in Paris of Shapur Bakhtiar, the last prime minister
before the 1979 Islamic revolution.
Bakhtiar was stabbed to death along with his secretary by people
who entered his suburban home in Paris as guests.
The two men were closely linked through years of shared
opposition to the Shah's regime and both spent long stints in jail
in the 1960s and 70s.
Almost all Iranian newspapers on Monday reported the couple's
death.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 00:20:31 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iranian leader rules out relations with US, Iran's "number one enemy"

TEHRAN, Nov 23 (AFP) - Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali
Khamenei on Monday ruled out a resumption of relations with the
United States which he termed Iran's "number one enemy."
The country's most senior politician condemned attempts by
various groups and "some media" to "alienate the people of Iran by
suggesting a normalisation of relations with the United States."
"This is all meaningless, no sensible person can submit his
country and his people to an oppressive power such as the United
States," Khamenei said in a speech to several thousand Revolutionary
Guards broadcast by state radio.
"The number one enemy of the country and our people is the
oppressor, that is to say the United States," he said, adding that
Islam will ensure the Iranian people's salvation and the country's
independence.
Iran and the United States have not had diplomatic relations
since 1980 when US embassy staff in Tehran were held hostage for
over a year, months after a violent revolution that toppled the
pro-Western imperial regime.
The United States has since accused Iran of supporting
international terrorism and undermining the Middle East peace
process.
Attempts at renewing a dialogue since the election in May 1997
of the moderate cleric Mohammad Khatami to the presidency have met
with fierce opposition from Iranian hardliners.
They have particularly rejected suggestions that Iran's economic
woes could be resolved if relations with the United States are
improved, and its economic embargo on Iran lifted.
Ayatollah Khamenei condemned those in Iran who exaggerate the
country's economic problems and said these can be overcome "through
our will, our efforts and our unity."
Khamenei's speech came two days after a group of visiting
Americans was attacked in Tehran by Islamic fundamentalists shouting
anti-American slogans. Their vehicle was damaged but they were
unhurt.

------------------------------

End of DNI-NEWS Digest - 22 Nov 1998 to 23 Nov 1998
***************************************************