Date: Nov 26, 1998 [ 0: 0: 0]

Subject: DNI-NEWS Digest - 24 Nov 1998 to 25 Nov 1998

From: Automatic digest processor


Return-Path: <owner-DNI-NEWS@D-N-I.ORG>
Delivered-To: farhad@ALGONET.SE
Received: (qmail 3082 invoked from network); 26 Nov 1998 09:00:17 +0100
Received: from simorgh.gpg.com (205.158.6.22)
by tomei.algonet.se with SMTP; 26 Nov 1998 09:00:17 +0100
Received: from simorgh (simorgh [205.158.6.22])
by simorgh.gpg.com (8.8.6/8.8.6) with ESMTP id AAA27789;
Thu, 26 Nov 1998 00:00:01 -0800 (PST)
Message-Id: <199811260800.AAA27789@simorgh.gpg.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Nov 1998 00:00:00 -0800
Reply-To: dni-disc@D-N-I.ORG
Sender: DNI news list <DNI-NEWS@D-N-I.ORG>
From: Automatic digest processor <D-N-I@D-N-I.ORG>
Subject: DNI-NEWS Digest - 24 Nov 1998 to 25 Nov 1998
To: Recipients of DNI-NEWS digests <DNI-NEWS@D-N-I.ORG>

There are 21 messages totalling 920 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. FWD: NATIONAL DAY OF MORNING
2. fwd: frontline press release
3. (fwd) Russia blasts US for "double standards" over Iran nuclear deal
4. Iranian opposition group condemns murder of dissident politician
5. US considering new gesture towards Iran
6. Iran signs nuclear cooperation accord with Russia
7. US weighs decision to take Iran off list of drug-producing countries
8. Clinton to remove Iran from drug list
9. Iran to cut subsidies on domestic oil use
10. Iranian vice president makes landmark visit to Egypt
11. Extremist group issues death threats against Americans in Iran
12. Khatami orders probe into slaying of opposition leader
13. Iran to buy Airbus planes to boost overcrowded passenger fleet
14. Iranian fishermen net huge sturgeon in Caspian Sea
15. Tehran says "zionists" implicated in murder of opposition leader
16. Iran's former president blames Tehran for opposition slaying
17. Russia vows to pursue nuclear cooperation with Iran
18. Earthquake hits northern Iran
19. Iranian judiciary orders inquiry into murder of opposition leader, wife
20. Radical Iranian group claims Tehran attack on Americans
21. Fruhar In the mirror of the history Part 1

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 09:28:11 +0100
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: FWD: NATIONAL DAY OF MORNING

Please distribute this message, by any means available to you, such as
E-mail, Fax, and Telephone…. Etc

Saturday November 28th, 1998 7:30PM
Washington DC, USA
American University, Ward II building


NATIONAL DAY OF MORNING


Iran National Front, USA received the shocking news of the horrible
assassination of Mr. Dariush Forouhar, chairman of the Iran’s Nation Party
(Hezbe Melat-e-Iran), and his wife Mrs. Parvaneh Forouhar (Eskandari)
political
activist, on Sunday Nov. 22, 1998.

This is a great loss for all Iranians, whom respect democracy and liberty.
During their life long struggles of over 50 years, the late Mr. & Mrs.
Forouhar
pursued liberty for all Iranians.

With great sadness we express our condolences to the families of Forouhar and
Eskandari and all Iranians around the world.

Iran National Front, USA in coordination with political, social, cultural and
human right organizations, around the world and inside Iran, hereby declares
the November 28, 1998 (7th day of Azar, 1377), the 7th day of the
assassination,
as a National Memorial Day in their honor.

Special programs for this public Memorial Day in Iran and around the world
will
be announced, shortly. In Washington DC Metropolitan area, we invite all
Iranians to participate in a gathering at the American University, Ward II
building, Saturday November 28th, 1998 at 7:30PM. Your present shows the
unity
of all Iranians around the world with the people in Iran, to voice our
disapproval of terrorism.

We express our support to all of the liberty loving people, whom are horrified
by this barbaric deed of terrorism. We belive this issue will not pass,
easily. It is up to all of us to take any measure necessary to uncover the
true perpetrators of this terror.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Iran National Front, for democracy (INF)
Dept. of International Affairs
Director: Shahram Kheyltash
P. O. Box 447
Falls Church, VA 22040-0447 USA
Tel: (703) 266-4114
Fax: (703) 471-1101

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 11:11:09 +0100
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad.abdolian@RSA.ERICSSON.SE>
Subject: fwd: frontline press release

The Murder of

Dariush Forouhar and his wife

A Repeat of the Mykonos Murders!

23 November 1998- The brutal and inhuman murder in Teheran of the secular
nationalist leader, Dariush Forouhar (Leader of the "Iranian Nations Party"
and his wife, Parvaneh), proves beyond any doubt that nothing has either
changed or evolved in Iran since the election to the presidency of Mohammad
Khatami.

This murderous act, committed against an individual who has been under
close guard and observation because of his opposition to the excesses of
the current regime, also proves beyond a shadow of a doubt that his murder
was instigated at the behest of the security forces, with the full
knowledge and compliance of all senior Islamic leaders.

This action that has come on the heel of the closure of a number of leading
newspapers and the imprisonment and torture of their staff, as well as the
arrest and imprisonment of leading clerics who have been critical of the
ruling religious establishment, should serve to underline to all Western
politicians and opinion makers, that false hopes should not be placed on a
system that is based on intolerance and disrespect for human rights and
human life.

At a time when so much international attention has been focused on Saddam
Hussein's Iraq and the Taliban's Afghanistan, it is a fact that Islamic
Iran's record in all departments is as bad, if not worse, than its
unacceptable neighbors. Hence, it is only right that the brutal theocratic
dictatorship in Iran should be subjected to the same types of
uncompromising international pressures until such time that it displays a
willingness for respecting the dignity and human rights of all Iranian
subjects.

ooooo







FRONT LINE

THE CONSTITUTIONALIST MOVEMENT OF IRAN (CMI-FL)

POB 326, London SW15 3NN, UK - Tel/Fax: (+44181) 780-1339; EM:
Frontline@dial.pipex.com

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:44:33 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: (fwd) Russia blasts US for "double standards" over Iran nuclear deal

MOSCOW, Nov 25 (AFP) - Russia lashed out at criticism Wednesday
of its decision to speed up nuclear cooperation with Iran by
accusing the United States of "double standards" that could
resurrect the Cold War era.
Moscow and Tehran signed a deal Tuesday pushing forward by three
months the completion of a 780-million-dollar Bushehr nuclear
reactor standing on the Persian Gulf shore.
The project has been vehemently opposed by the United States and
Israel as both fear Russia in effect is helping Iran develop its own
nuclear arsenal. The US Congress last month voted to slash in half a
multi-million dollar aid package to Russia because of Moscow's
cooperation with Tehran.
But Russia's Deputy Atomic Energy Minister Viktor Mikhailov
stressed there was no military angle to the Bushehr deal and warned
Washington it was risking a Cold War by trying to torpedo Russia's
project.
"Iran is a model member of the international nuclear community,"
Mikhailov told journalists. "We have found no military aspects to
their nuclear program. Cooperation with Iran is very important for
Russia.
"The United Nations -- and not one single country -- must keep
track of military programs," he added.
"Why was Iran banished as a whole people? This is a double
standard by the United States which could push us back to the era of
the Cold War."
Asked if he thought Moscow's relations with Washington may sour
over the deal, Mikhail said: "There will be no change. The Persian
Gulf is a vital region to us both."
He added that Iran was decades away from putting its civilian
nuclear program to military use. "Iran today is not ready
scientifically or technologically to build nuclear weapons. Maybe
10, 15 or 20 years will pass before they can develop in this area."
Both the United States and Israel are of a strongly different
opinion and question why Iran needs nuclear energy when it is one of
the world's biggest crude oil exporters.
"Such a development threatens peace, the whole region and in the
end the Russians themselves," Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu told a Jerusalem radio station Tuesday.
"I hope that Russia will reconsider this initiative, which flies
in the face of attempts to reach peace and stability in the region,"
Netanyahu said.
Instead of reconsidering, however, Russia is mulling plans to
broadly branch out its financially lucrative Iranian nuclear
program.
Tehran is currently courting the Russian atomic energy ministry
to build three additional nuclear reactors in Iran.
Mikhailov said Russia has not yet signed such an agreement and
would probably consider the Iranian offer only by 2003, when the
Bushehr reactor is due to be completed.
"Iran's attempts to hurry up and build the next three reactors
concern me a little bit," Mikhailov said.
The agreement to speed up completion of the Bushehr reactor was
signed in Tehran on Tuesday during a visit there by Russian Nuclear
Energy Minister Yevgeny Adamov.
Adamov told reporters in Moscow on Wednesday that he welcomed
Iran's demand for three additional nuclear reactors.
"We have received such an offer and it serves as proof that Iran
once again believes that this (Bushehr) will soon be complete,"
Adamov said.
The Bushehr project was abandoned by Germany under strong
pressure by the United States following the 1979 Islamic
revolution.
Russia signed its first nuclear cooperation agreement with Iran
in 1992, with a contract for the Bushehr reactor signed three years
later.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:44:27 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iranian opposition group condemns murder of dissident politician

TEHRAN, Nov 25 (AFP) - The outlawed but tolerated Freedom
Movement of Iran (FMI) condemned on Wednesday the "tragic murder of
leading nationalist dissident Dariush Foruhar and his wife.
The killing of Foruhar and his wife, Parvaneh Eskandari, was
"sad for the people of Iran and a shock for the world as well as
treacherous," the FMI said in a statement.
Champions of freedom should resist efforts "by those who want to
spread terror to hamper the country's political progress," the FMI
said. It also called on President Mohammad Khatami to do his utmost
to identify and capture the perpetrators of "this abominable crime."
Police have launched a manhunt for the murderers of the veteran
politician and his wife, who were stabbed to death in their home on
Sunday.
Officials and Iranian newspapers have generally condemned the
murder, although the victim was one of the regime's most outspoken
critics.
Foruhar was long an opponent of the late Shah of Iran and
briefly joined the provisional government of Mehdi Bazargan as
labour minister, following the 1979 Islamic Revolution that toppled
the Iranian monarchy.
He resigned from office and became one of the Islamic Republic's
boldest critics, lambasting Iran's religious rulers in interviews to
foreign radios.
Foruhar, a staunch secular nationalist, was not a member of the
FMI, whose members are mostly religious liberals.
The FMI is led by former foreign minister Ibrahim Yazdi and is
grudgingly tolerated by the government, though its members are often
prosecuted for various charges and denounced as western lackeys.
Funeral ceremonies for the couple are will take place Thursday
in a central Tehran mosque.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:44:48 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: US considering new gesture towards Iran

WASHINGTON, Nov 24 (AFP) - The United States is weighing whether
to take Iran off its black list of countries that have failed to
cooperate in the war on drugs -- a move that would once again
highlight Washington's desire for better ties with Tehran.
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright recently presented her
recommendation on the drug countries list to the White House and
President Bill Clinton is expected to announce a decision "soon",
said an official who asked not to be named.
State Department spokesman James Rubin confirmed that Clinton
was currently reviewing the list of drug-producing countries and
that it would be submitted to Congress for approval.
Albright has repeatedly lauded Iran's efforts to eradicate poppy
cultivation within its borders in statements that officials
acknowledged were "an indicator" of how the US policy might change.
The move would be the latest in a series of overtures from
Washington to the Islamic state, which has thus far failed to take
up a US offer to open a dialogue on restoring diplomatic relations.
Iran has not been certified as a country cooperating in the war
on drugs since the blacklist was first established by the State
Department in 1987.
The determination by the US administration means that countries
deemed uncooperative are barred from receiving financial aid.
Nigeria, Burma and Afghanistan were also placed on the blacklist
that was issued for 1997.
The United States and Iran have been locked in enmity since the
1979 hostage-taking by Islamic revolutionaries at the US embassy in
Tehran that prompted a break in relations in 1980 and a series of
sanctions against the regime.
But over the past year, the State Department has shifted its
approach to Iran, which is seen as a key regional player at a time
when the United States is trying to secure a foothold in the
resource-rich Caspian region.
Iran's moderate President Mohammad Khatami, who took office in
May, has called for more people-to-people exchanges between Iran and
the United States but has not offered talks at the governmental
level.
Other voices in Iran have called on Washington to take concrete
steps to show that its approach to Tehran has changed.
US officials have expressed concern over the past months that
conservatives in Iran may be getting the upper hand in the struggle
for power that has ensued in Tehran.
An extremist Iranian movement calling itself "Fedayeen of Islam"
has claimed responsibility for an attack on a group of Americans at
the weekend that resulted in minor injuries.
The group issued a death threat against other US nationals
coming to Iran on Monday despite Khatami's call that there should be
more exchanges between the two peoples.
Albright has said the United States must be patient in its drive
to persuade Iran to open up to its arch-enemy.
Officials also insist that the State Department must stay the
course and convince Tehran that it has nothing to lose by entering
into a dialogue with Washington.
The United States has put forward three demands for a thaw in
US-Iranian relations, saying Iran must stop pursuing weapons of mass
destruction, supporting terrorism and attempting to undermine the
Israeli-Arab peace process.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:44:41 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran signs nuclear cooperation accord with Russia

TEHRAN, Nov 24 (AFP) - Iran and Russia signed an accord Tuesday
to speed up completion of a controversial nuclear reactor and study
development of other nuclear plants in Iran, despite US opposition
to such cooperation.
The memorandum of understanding calls for the creation of joint
research groups to study the addition of a second unit to the plant
at the Gulf port of Bushehr "as well as to build new-generation
nuclear power plants in Iran", the official news agency IRNA
reported.
Russia has agreed that completion of the first phase of the
778-million-dollar Bushehr plant would be brought forward by three
months, state radio reported.
Qolam-Reza Aqazadeh, the head of Iran's Atomic Energy
Organisation, said construction of the plant was expected to be
completed in 52 months after various contractual and technical
problems were ironed out and despite "external political pressures",
the official IRNA news agency said.
The accord was signed at the end of a visit here by Russian
Atomic Energy Minister Yevgeny Adamov, who said on Monday that his
country was determined to continue its nuclear cooperation with
Iran.
"In our relations with other countries, we will not be
influenced by interference from third parties," he said, apparently
referring to the United States and Israel which have opposed Russian
cooperation with Iran on nuclear and military matters.
Both countries, regarded as Iran's greatest enemies, fear the
Islamic republic may acquire the technological know-how to build
nuclear weapons.
(In Jerusalem, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
condemned the accord as a threat to the entire region.)
("The building of a nuclear reactor in Iran only makes it
likelier that Iran will equip its ballistic missiles with nuclear
warheads," Netanyahu told Israeli public radio.)
("Such a development threatens peace, the whole region and in
the end, the Russians themselves," Netanyahu said.)
Adamov, who visited the Bushehr plant during his stay, denied
that delays in the project had been caused by US pressure.
He said the target date for completion of the project was "quite
reasonable" given the standard time-frame for nuclear plants, of
more than nine years.
Russia signed a 1995 agreement to build the 1,000 megawatt
light-water reactor at Bushehr, after the project was abandoned by
German company Siemens following the 1979 Islamic revolution.
Both Moscow and Tehran insist the plant is for non-military use
and say its activities will be subject to inspection by the
International Atomic Energy Agency, which monitors nuclear
programmes around the world.
The accord also provides for exchange of information on nuclear
science to "elevate Iranian nuclear know-how".
In October, Iran set aside 140 million dollars for the
construction of the plant's first phase, after Russia voiced concern
over whether Iran could afford the project.
Aqazadeh said "special arrangements" had been made to enable
Iran to pay part of its dues to Russia through exports and had
recently shipped 15 million dollars of cars and buses there.
Around 1,000 people were working on the plant, 300 of them
Russians, Aqazadeh said.
He said construction had been delayed by "certain ambiguities in
the contract with Russia" and a delay by Iran in submitting some
documents to Russia.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:44:54 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: US weighs decision to take Iran off list of drug-producing countries

WASHINGTON, Nov 24 (AFP) - The United States is weighing whether
to take Iran off the list of countries that have failed to cooperate
in the international war on drugs, officials said Tuesday.
The move would be the latest in a series of overtures from
Washington to the Islamic state, which has failed to take up a US
offer to open up a dialogue on restoring diplomatic relations.
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright recently made her
recommendation on the drug countries list to the White House and
President Bill Clinton is expected to announce a decision "soon",
said a State Department official.
Albright has repeatedly lauded Iran's efforts to fight drug
production and trafficking within its borders in statements that
officials acknowledged were "an indicator" of how the US policy
might change.
Iran, Nigeria, Burma and Afghanistan last year were on the
blacklist of countries that have failed to make efforts to curb drug
trafficking and production.
The determination by the US administration meant that those
countries were barred from receiving financial aid.
State Department spokesman James Rubin confirmed that Clinton
was currently reviewing the list of drug-producing countries and
that it would be submitted to Congress for its approval.
Iran has not been certified as a country cooperating in the war
on drugs since the blacklist was first established by the State
Department in 1987.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:45:13 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Clinton to remove Iran from drug list

WASHINGTON, Nov. 24 (UPI) -- President Clinton plans to remove
sanctions imposed on Iran for its failure to cooperate in the
international war on drugs, U.S. officials say, but the American trade
and diplomatic embargo will remain in place due to Tehran's alleged
support of international terrorism.
State Department spokesman James Rubin said today that Secretary of
State Madeleine Albright provided Clinton this week with her
recommendation as to which countries should remain on the
administration's list of major drug-producing or drug-transiting
nations, but he declined to reveal the details of her confidential
advice to the president.
U.S. officials, speaking under conditions of anonymity, told United
Press International that Iran was the only one of 30 nations on the list
last year that Albright recommended for removal this year.
They said she based her recommendation on a conclusion American
intelligence agencies drew from satellite reconnaissance and other means
that less than 300 hectares of land in Iran was being cultivated for
illicit drug crops, which is the threshold for qualification as a major
drug-producing nation.
``She wouldn't have recommended the president take Iran off the list
unless they were under the limit,'' a U.S. official said.
Determining which nations qualify for the list is the first step the
president must take in deciding whether to impose sanctions, which bar
most forms of assistance and require the United States to vote against
loans from such multilateral lenders as the World Bank and International
Monetary Fund.
The sanctions will only be applied if the president determines that a
nation on the list is not cooperating with U.S. counter-narcotics
efforts, a finding Clinton made last year for Iran, Afghanistan, Burma
and Nigeria. Since Iran is will not even be on the list, U.S. officials
said, the drug sanctions would not apply.
But they say the move is largely symbolic since the Clinton
administration formally names Iran as a state sponsor of international
terrorism, a designation that requires the same set of sanctions as well
as a ban on formal diplomatic relations.
The Clinton administration has been engaging in diplomatic foreplay
with Iran since the election of purportedly moderate President Mohammad
Khatami, who has spoken about a desire to reach out to the people of the
United States and made a few gestures indicating an interest in
improving relations with the West. But the overtures have produced no
tangible easing of tension between Washington and Tehran.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:45:25 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran to cut subsidies on domestic oil use

TEHRAN, Nov 24 (AFP) - Iran, the world's second largest oil
producer, is considering cutting subsidies on domestic petrol
consumption next year to save money, according to press reports
Tuesday.
The government has decided to limit subsidies, allowing
consumers to buy 45 litres of petrol for 250 rials (eight cents) a
litre, with prices rising to 700 rials (23 cents) a litre for any
extra fuel.
Under current state subsidies, Iranians pay 200 rials (just
under seven cents) a litre.
The Iranian government subsidises a number of basic goods as
part of its social commitment to lower income groups. But these are
proving increasingly burdensome for a country that is facing a 6.3
billion dollar budget deficit this year because of plummeting oil
prices.
Subsidised prices have also led to uncontrolled domestic fuel
consumption, which the London-based Centre for Global Energy Studies
estimates may exceed Iran's crude export revenues this year.
The government has conducted a poster campaign to encourage
people to consume less fuel but to little effect.
Economists say reduced subsidies are a necessary step in cutting
government spending and waste. But such measures put pressure on
those on fixed incomes, already hard pushed to make ends meet, and
could have inflationary effects in an economy that runs on cheap
petrol.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:45:33 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iranian vice president makes landmark visit to Egypt

CAIRO, Nov 24 (AFP) - Iranian Vice President Massumeh Ebtekar,
the highest-ranking Iranian official to visit Egypt since ties were
severed 20 years ago, attended an international environmental
conference here Tuesday.
Ebtekar, who also heads the Iranian environmental protection
agency, is attending the 10th ministerial conference of the Montreal
Protocol, an international agreement aimed at protecting the ozone
layer from damage.
He arrived overnight Monday, an Iranian diplomat told AFP.
Egypt and Iran severed diplomatic relations in the aftermath of
the 1979 Islamic Revolution which toppled the Shah, Mohamed Reza
Pahlavi, who later sought exile and died in Cairo.
But relations warmed after the election in May 1997 of Mohammad
Khatami, a moderate, as president of Iran, with low-level official
visits exchanged. Both countries maintain interest sections in the
other's capitals.
On Monday, Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharazi welcomed "the
very positive climate" allowing for better relations with Egypt but
said Cairo should distance itself further from Israel.
The 1979 Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty was another reason for
the breakdown in diplomatic ties 20 years ago.
A delegation of Iranian journalists is also currently visiting
Cairo.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:45:43 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Extremist group issues death threats against Americans in Iran

TEHRAN, Nov 24 (AFP) - An extremist Iranian movement which
claimed an attack on a group of US nationals here issued death
threats Tuesday against other Americans coming to Iran.
The group calling itself "Fedayeen of Islam" said Saturday's
operation against a bus carrying 13 Americans was a warning to
Iranian authorities and "CIA spies" visiting Iran in the guise of
tourists.
"American spies, their masters and their hosts should know that
this Islamic land is no place for American yankees. They should know
that our next operations will put the "Death to America" slogan into
practical effect," Hamshahri newspaper reported, quoting a letter
from the group.
Other papers carried similar reports, though none gave details
about what Hamshahri termed a "new group."
The Fedayeen, or Devotees of Islam, claimed the Americans it
attacked on Saturday were "spies," but Iran's foreign ministry said
the group had come to visit historic sights and possibly consider
investment opportunities.
Some of the 13 Americans suffered minor injuries fron flying
glass when the bus they were travelling in was attacked by pipe and
club-wielding Islamic militants.
Washington on Monday rejected claims the Americans were US
government officials or CIA agents and said it continued to support
people-to-people exchanges as advocated by moderate Iranian
President Mohammad Khatami.
Iran's interior ministry condemned the attack as
"unacceptable."
"Even if an organisation issues visas to someone by mistake, the
life of the person who has been issued a visa should be protected,"
Deputy Interior Minister Mostafa Tajzadeh told the English-language
Iran News.
The visit triggered a barrage of criticism from conservative
newspapers and MPs who claimed it had been organised by the foreign
ministry despite injunctions by supreme leader Ayatollah Ali
Khamenei against any official dialogue with the United States.
Khamenei on Monday described the United States, which broke ties
with Iran after the 1979 Islamic revolution, as the country's
"number one enemy."
Earlier this month the Fedayeen threatened suicide attacks
against two US diplomats who were held hostage after the storming of
the US embassy in Tehran in 1979 and had announced they might return
to Iran on a reconciliation visit.
A group bearing the same name led by cleric Navab Safavi was
responsible for the murder of several politicians during the early
years of the shah's reign in the 1940s.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:46:07 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Khatami orders probe into slaying of opposition leader

TEHRAN, Nov 24 (AFP) - Iranian President Mohammad Khatami
ordered an official inquiry Tuesday into what he branded the
"repulsive" slaying of a leading opposition figure and his wife two
days ago.
Khatami ordered Interior Minister Abdul Vahid Musavi-Lari to
form a special commission to investigate the brutal stabbing murder
of Dariush Foruhar, a nationalist politician opposed to the Islamic
regime, and his wife, at their home in Tehran on Sunday.
"This repulsive and deplorable but also disturbing crime is
designed to instill doubts in people's minds on the government's
determination to insure the security of citizens," he wrote in the
letter which was broadcast on state radio.
Khatami called on the interior and intelligence ministries to
help the commission identify the murderers "so they are punished in
accordance with the law and justice."
Iran's judiciary chief Ayatollah Mohammad Yazdi had already
called on relevant authorities to take speedy action to capture the
person or persons responsible.
Foruhar, known for his nationalist and secular views, was
briefly labour minister in the provisional government that ran the
country following the 1979 Islamic revolution.
He has since been an outspoken critic of Iran's religious
rulers, and had been attacked several times before his death.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:46:29 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran to buy Airbus planes to boost overcrowded passenger fleet

TEHRAN, Nov 24 (AFP) - Iran is planning to buy three Airbus
aircraft from Senegal to help its overburdened passenger fleet,
according to press reports here.
Ahmad Reza Kazemi, managing director of state-owned Iran Air,
said a delegation is currently in Senegal negotiating terms for the
purchase of the B-300s, the state-run newspaper Iran reported.
Iran earlier this month said it needed another 130 civilian
aircraft to fully meet demand for air travel. The company currently
has 28 planes in service, most of which date from before the 1979
Islamic revolution and are in need of new parts and servicing.
But Kazemi insisted Iran Air planes have all been repaired and
ready for service "in accordance with international standards."
Iran's efforts to upgrade and repair its passenger fleet have
been hampered by a sharp plunge in the national currency caused by
declining oil prices, and a US economic embargo preventing the
transfer of advanced technology to the country.
The United States is concerned that Iran will use techonology to
pursue a secret arms programme.
The Iranian government has had to turn to Russia for more
planes, leasing 10 Russian piloted Tupolev planes that are mainly
used for domestic flights.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:46:38 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iranian fishermen net huge sturgeon in Caspian Sea

TEHRAN, Nov 24 (AFP) - Iranian fishermen caught an enormous
sturgeon weighing 290 kilograms (640 pounds) in the Caspian Sea, the
official news agency IRNA reported Tuesday.
The fish, measuring 3.5 metres (over 11 feet) from head to tail,
yielded almost 51 kilos (112 pounds) of premium grade caviar worth
around 100 million rials (around 30,000 dollars at the official
exchange rate).
Fishermen caught an even larger beluga sturgeon earlier in the
month, weighing 490 kilos (1,000 pounds) and yielding 53 kilos (117
pounds) of the best caviar.
Iran's government strictly regulates sturgeon fishing to protect
the species that provide it with one of its principal sources of
foreign exchange.
Each year Iran releases around 20 million sturgeon fry into the
sea and has banned fishing with closely-woven nets to protect young
sturgeon.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:46:49 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Tehran says "zionists" implicated in murder of opposition leader

TEHRAN, Nov 24 (AFP) - A senior Iranian official on Monday
accused the "zionists" of being implicated in the murder here of
Daryoush Foruhar, a prominent figure in the secular nationalist
opposition, and of his wife.
"I have no doubt at all that what happened to Foruhar was
committed by pressure groups linked to the zionists", said Mohsen
Rezai, Secretary-General of the Discernment Council, the country's
highest strategy-planning body.
"The zionists eliminate people, not in power but who create
problems for society," he told a group of students in Zanjan
(central iran), the official IRNA news agency reported.
Rezai, a former leader of the fanatical Revolutionary Guards
(Pasdaran), did not identify what "pressure groups" he was referring
to, saying only that "they are working against our revolution and
our nation".
Foruhar and his wife were stabbed to death in their home here on
Sunday evening by unknown assailants. Foruhar led the Iranian
Nation's Party and was known for his vehement criticism of the
Islamic regime.
Iranian police has launched a manhunt to track down the killer
or killers who are believed to have posed as friends of their
victims.
On Monday, several radical newspapers criticised the "heinous
killings" and the government daily said the double murder came at a
time when the "country more than ever needs to believe in the
government of President Mohammad Khatami".
mb/raf/tp/Kar/jb

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:46:59 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran's former president blames Tehran for opposition slaying

PARIS, Nov 23 (AFP) - Former Iranian president Abolhassan
Banisadr accused Teheran on Monday of being responsible for the
assassination of secular opposition leader Dariush Foruhar and his
wife on the weekend.
In a statement, Banisadr, who lives in exile in France, said
that the "terror regime" in Iran had "savagely" murdered the couple
whom he described as having never stopped "fighting for their
values" and the freedom and independence of Iran.
He added that the time had now come to "protest and rise up
against the bloody regime."
Foruhar was a longtime opponent of the former Shah, who was
toppled in the 1979 Islamic revolution, and became labour minister
for a brief period after the revolution.
The secular-minded Foruhar soon turned against the Islamic
regime, often accusing it of failing to respect democratic
principles.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:47:12 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Russia vows to pursue nuclear cooperation with Iran

TEHRAN, Nov 22 (AFP) - Russian Atomic Energy Minister Yevgeny
Adamov said here Monday that his country was determined to continue
its nuclear cooperation with Iran.
"Russia's foreign policy is independent and we deem our
relations with Iran as lasting," Adamov said in talks with former
Iranian president Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani.
"In our relations with other countries, we will not be
influenced by interference from third parties," he said, quoted by
the official news agency IRNA.
"Presently the way has been paved for the two countries to boost
cooperation in science and technology, especially new projects and
the continuation of work at Bushehr power plant.
"This is a good lesson for other countries," said the Russian
official, who was accompanied at the meeting by several MPs from the
Duma, Russia's lower house parliament.
Adamov, who arrived Saturday to visit the plant, was apparently
referring to the United States and Israel which have opposed Russian
cooperation with Iran on nuclear and military matters.
They fear the Islamic republic may acquire the technological
know-how to build nuclear weapons.
Russia signed a 1994 agreement to build a 1,000 megawatt
light-water reactor estimated to cost around 800 million dollars.
Both Moscow and Tehran insist that the plant is for non-military
use and say that its activities will be subject to inspection by the
International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which monitors nuclear
programmes around the world.
"Any country has a natural right to a non-military and peaceful
use of nuclear energy, which is economical and prevents
environmental pollution," Rafsanjani said.
"The Americans do not like to see Russia cooperate with other
countries, especially Iran," he charged.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:47:21 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Earthquake hits northern Iran

TEHRAN, Nov 23 (AFP) - An earthquake measuring 4.5 on the
Richter scale struck regions in northwestern Iran on Monday but
apparently did not cause any casualties or damage, the official IRNA
news agency reported.
The temblor hit areas north of Tabriz, the main city in East
Azerbaijan province, at 02:41 p.m. (1111 GMT), and was felt in
several nearby towns.
IRNA said the quake caused a panic among residents.
Iranian highland has been struck by several earthquakes in
recent days, including one with an intensity of 5.6 that shook the
southern Kerman province on Wednesday, causing severe damage but no
casualties.


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:47:31 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iranian judiciary orders inquiry into murder of opposition leader, wife

TEHRAN, Nov 23 (AFP) - Iran's judiciary has ordered a "speedy"
investigation into the stabbing deaths of an opposition leader and
his wife by unidentified assailants.
Judiciary chief Ayatollah Mohammad Yazdi expressed regret Monday
over the weekend murder of Dariush Foruhar, a nationalist politician
and outspoken critic of Iran's Islamic regime, and of his wife,
Parvaneh.
He asked the relevent authorities to act "with speed and
precision to identify, arrest and punish the culprits."
Police have already launched a manhunt for the killer or
killers, who are believed to have entered the couple's house as
guests.
Foruhar was a longtime opponent of the former Shah, who was
toppled in the 1979 Islamic revolution, before becoming labour
minister for a brief period after the revolution.
The secular-minded Foruhar soon turned against the Islamic
regime, often accusing it of failing to respect democratic
principles.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:47:41 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Radical Iranian group claims Tehran attack on Americans

CAIRO, Nov 23 (AFP) - A radical Iranian group, Sacrificers for
Islam, has claimed to have carried out an attack in Tehran on a bus
carrying a group of Americans, the Arabic-language newspaper Al
Hayat reported Monday.
"In a telephone call to this newspaper's office in Tehran, an
anonymous caller claimed responsibility in the name of the group and
said several of (the Americans) had been injured," Al Hayat said.
"Supporters of the revolution and supreme leader (Ayatollah Ali
Khamenei) followed the spies and found them at the Esteghal hotel at
midnight Saturday night and attacked them as they got off the bus,"
the caller said.
"This is a warning to all spies," the caller reportedly added.
A group of pipe- and club-wielding Islamic fundamentalists,
accusing the Americans of being US officials and CIA spies, attacked
the bus in which they were travelling in front of their Tehran hotel
late Saturday.
Shouting anti-American slogans, they broke the windows of the
bus, but did not hurt any of the occupants, according to Iranian
press reports.
According to Al Hayat, the Sacrificers for Islam was mentioned
for the first time two weeks ago in the newspaper Al Qods when it
threatened to carry out suicide attacks against American diplomats.
The visit to Tehran by the group of Americans has whipped up
controversy in the Islamic republic, with hardline newspapers
accusing the Americans of being spies disguised as tourists.
The hardliners argued that the visit contravened a strict order
by Ayatollah Khamenei for the government not to have any official
contact with Washington
But Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharazi said Monday that the
Americans were not politicians,
"There were no political figures from the United States in the
American-led delegation. It is regrettable that the press said they
were politicians," Kharazi told the English-language Iran News.
Iran News said the delegation consisted of businessmen and their
wives, while Kharazi said they were in Iran to "visit tourist
attractions and perhaps examine Iran's economic potential."
The United States broke ties with Iran in 1980 after
revolutionary students stormed the US embassy in Tehran and took US
diplomats hostage for more than a year, and relations are still
hostile.
Iran's moderate President Mohammad Khatami has taken tentative
steps towards rapprochement, but his efforts are constantly
undermined by conservative hardliners opposed to renewed ties with
the "Great Satan."

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:54:34 +0000
From: "a.abdi" <a.abdi@BTINTERNET.COM>
Subject: Fruhar In the mirror of the history Part 1

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------577D222035CE76C099B27F86
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit



--------------577D222035CE76C099B27F86
Content-Type: message/rfc822
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Disposition: inline