Date: Nov 22, 1998 [ 15: 48: 36]

Subject: Forouhar & wife murdered

From: THE IRANIAN TIMES


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Date: Sun, 22 Nov 1998 15:48:36 -0400
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From: THE IRANIAN TIMES <times@iranian.com>
Subject: Forouhar & wife murdered

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T H E I R A N I A N T I M E S


Saturday, November 22, 1998



NEWSFLASH




Dissident leader, wife stabbed to death-IRNA



TEHRAN, Nov 22 (Reuters) - An outspoken Iranian opposition leader and his
wife were stabbed to death at their home on Sunday, the official Iranian
news agency reported.

It quoted police as saying Dariush Forouhar, former labour minister and
head of the small nationalist Iran Nation Party, and his wife Parvaneh were
found dead at their home in Tehran.

Police were investigating the killings, whose nature was yet to be
clarified, IRNA said without elaborating.

Forouhar and his wife often criticised alleged violations of human and
political rights in statements and interviews with Persian-language
programmes beamed to Iran by Western radios.

The Iran Nation Party, which publishes a weekly newsletter critical of the
government, had called for a boycott of last month's nationwide elections
to a powerful clerical assembly, saying the polls were undemocratic.

Hardline militants had on several occasions over the last few years
attacked meetings by Forouhar's party.

Forouhar, who spent many years in jail during the rule of the late Shah
Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, served as labour minister in the first government
after the 1979 Islamic revolution which toppled the shah.




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--------------768F50F05BB183EBAF08BC6B--

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 01:17:07 +0100
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: U.S. visit to Iran includes CIA agents, paper says

TEHRAN, Nov 21 (Reuters) - A hardline newspaper on Saturday blasted a visit
by 13 U.S. citizens to Iran as a ``political mission under the guise of
tourism,''saying some of the travellers were CIA agents.

The Jomhuri Eslami daily said the American group that arrived in Tehran last
week was gathering political information and studying Iran's economic
projects, free zones and oil sales.

However, the evening newspaper Kayhan quoted Iran's Foreign Ministry saying
it had no information about a U.S. political or economic delegation, and
had not organised such visit.

Jomhuri Eslami said a number of the members of the group were high-ranking
CIA agents.

``Although this group has arrived under the disguise of tourism...its visit
has been organised by the foreign ministry,'' the daily quoted reliable
sources as saying.

``The members of the delegation have so far met with a minister, a deputy
minister and an official of the free zones.

``Why has the Foreign Ministry acted against the order of the leader of the
revolution who has banned visits by American political individuals?'' Jomhuri
Eslami said.

Grassroots contacts between Iran and the United States have been on the rise
since President Mohammad Khatami's landmark message to the American people in
January, calling for dialogue between the peoples of the two countries.

Relations between Iran and the United States were severed in 1979 after
militant students stormed the U.S. embassy in Tehran and held 52 Americans
hostage for 444 days.

11:27 11-21-98

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 00:27:55 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Islamic hardliners attack American "spies" visiting Iran

TEHRAN, Nov 22 (AFP) - A group of visiting Americans accused of
being US spies came under attack on Saturday by Islamic
fundamentalists opposed to any rapprochement with Iran's great
enemy, a newspaper reported Sunday.
Chanting "Death to America," demonstrators smashed windows of
the Americans' vehicle near a hotel in northern Tehran where they
had been staying, but none of the occupants was hurt, Kayhan evening
newspaper said.
Kayhan said a senior Iranian official later arrived at the hotel
to apologize to the 13 Americans over the incident and take them to
lunch.
But the group decided to cut the trip short and left Tehran for
Washington on Saturday night, newspapers reported.
The visit has whipped up controversy in the Islamic republic,
with hardline newspapers accusing the Americans of being spies
disguised as tourists.
In an article headlined: "What are America's Political Agents
Doing in Tehran?" the fundamentalist newspaper Jomhuri Islami said
the group included several "senior CIA officials."
The United States broke ties with Iran in 1980 after
revolutionary students stormed the US embassy in Tehran and took
staff hostage for more than a year, and relations are still
hostile.
Iran's moderate President Mohammad Khatami has taken tentative
steps towards rapprochement, but his efforts are constantly
undermined by conservative hardliners opposed to renewed ties with
the "Great Satan."
Nevertheless over the past year there has been growing social
and sporting contact with the United States, which maintains an
interest section here at the Swiss embassy.
Several hardline newspapers accused the American visitors of
seeking to gather political information, while others said they were
in Iran to explore investment opportunities and hold talks with
officials.
Jomuri Islami charged that the foreign ministry had contravened
strict orders by Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei not to
have official contact with the United States.
"This invitation to the American spies is unjustifable at a time
when American leaders insist on continuing their hostile policies
against the Islamic republic," said conservative MP Nafiseh
Fayaz-Bakhsh.
But the foreign ministry has denied organising the trip and said
it has no knowledge of a visit by American officials, accusing
"certain newspapers of publishing lies to disturb public opinion."
But Kayhan charged that the ministry's protocol department had
arranged meetings between the Americans and a minister, a deputy
minister and a high-ranking political figure.
"During their stay here, the Americans were moved around the
city in full escort. So it is very strange and surprising that the
foreign ministry is claiming to be uninformed of the matter," it
said.
Kayhan said the visit had been arranged by a non-governmental
organisation headed by a former member of Iran's interest section in
the United States.
The conservative Resalat newspaper accused the foreign ministry
of pursuing a "dual policy" on relations with Washington and
questioned how such visits contributed to Iran's "national
interest."
"Given the particular status of relations between Tehran and
Washington, no American delegation can visit Iran without permission
from the foreign ministry," it said, adding: "This inverse
relationship is taking on a new dangerous dimension daily."
In another incident, renowned Iranian film director Daryoush
Mehrjoui has complained of mistreatment by US immigration
authorities at New York's JFK airport.
Mehrjoui told the official Iranian news agency IRNA from New
York on Sunday that he had been forcibly fingerprinted, action he
described as an "insult."
US officials were embarrassed in April after a team of Iranian
wrestlers travelling to the United States were detained for two
hours, fingerprinted and photographed under security regulations
against Iranian citizens.
US Secretary of States Madeleine Albright said at the time the
procedure would be reviewed to encourage more visits from Iranian
nationals.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 00:28:02 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Islamic hardliners attack Americans visiting Iran

TEHRAN, Nov 22 (AFP) - A group of Islamic hardliners attacked a
car carrying a group of Americans visiting Iran on Saturday, a
newspaper reported Sunday.
Kayhan daily said a group of people chanting "death to America"
assaulted the vehicle near Esteqlal hotel in northern Tehran, where
the Americans had been staying.
They broke the windows of the car, but none of the occupants was
hurt.
Kayhan said a senior Iranian official later arrived at the hotel
to apologize to the Americans and take them to lunch.
The 13 Americans decided to cut their trip short and left Tehran
for Washington on Saturday night.
The visit by the Americans had stirred up a controversy in the
Islamic republic, with conservative politicians and hardline
newspapers accusing them of being spies disguised as tourists.
In an article Sunday headlined "What are America's Political
Agents Doing in Tehran?" the fundamentalist Jomhuri Islami said the
group of Americans included several "senior CIA officials."
Jomhuri and several other hardline newspapers accused the
visitors of seeking to gather political information, while others
said they were in Iran to explore investment opportunities and hold
talks with officials.
The daily charged that the foreign ministry had contravened
strict orders by Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei not to
have official contact with the United States.
"This invitation to the American spies is unjustifable at a time
when American leaders insist on continuing their hostile policies
against the Islamic republic," said conservative MP Nafiseh
Fayaz-Bakhsh.
But the foreign ministry has denied any knowledge of American
officials visiting the country.
It also denied having organized the trip and accused "certain
newspapers of publishing lies to disturb public opinion."
Tehran and Washington have not had diplomatic ties since 1980,
after US embassy staff in Tehran were taken hostage by revolutionary
students.
Iran's moderate President Mohammad Khatami has tried to bring
the two nations together, but his efforts are incessantly undermined
by conservative hardliners opposed to renewed ties with the United
States.
There have nevertheless been growing social and sporting contact
between the two countries in the past year.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 00:28:10 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Americans visiting Iran accused of being "spies"

TEHRAN, Nov 22 (AFP) - A visit by a group of Americans to Iran
this week has stirred up a controversy in the Islamic republic, with
politicians and hardline newspapers accusing them of being spies
disguised as tourists.
In an article Sunday headlined "What are America's Political
Agents Doing in Tehran?" the fundamentalist Jomhuri Islami said the
group of Americans included several "senior CIA officials."
Jomhuri and several other hardline newspapers accused the
visitors of seeking to gather political information, while others
said they were in Iran to explore investment opportunities and hold
talks with officials.
The daily charged that the foreign ministry had contravened
strict orders by Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei not to
have official contact with the United States.
"This invitation to the American spies is unjustifable at a time
when American leaders insist on continuing their hostile policies
against the Islamic republic," said conservative MP Nafiseh
Fayaz-Bakhsh.
But the foreign ministry has denied any knowledge of American
officials visiting the country.
It also denied having organized the trip and accused "certain
newspapers of publishing lies to disturb public opinion."
Hardline newspapers said the delegation had held talks with
several Iranian officials -- including a minister, a deputy minister
and the leaders of Iran's free trade zones.
The Tehran Times reported Sunday that the Americans had decided
to cut their trip short after "receiving phone threats and being
harassed" and the Jomhuri Islami said they left Saturday night.
Tehran and Washington have not had diplomatic ties since 1980,
after US embassy staff in Tehran were taken hostage by revolutionary
students.
Iran's moderate President Mohammad Khatami has tried to bring
the two nations together, but his efforts are incessantly undermined
by conservative hardliners opposed to renewed ties with the United
States.
There have nevertheless been growing social and sporting contact
between the two countries in the past year.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 00:28:31 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran refuses to work with US to oust Saddam

TEHRAN, Nov 21 (AFP) - The commander of Iran's navy said
Saturday his country will not work with the United States to topple
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, saying it was a matter for the Iraqi
people to decide.
"Iran's policy on Iraq has been consistent throughout the years.
Firstly, Iraq's territorial integrity must be preserved,"
Rear-Admiral Abbas Mohtaj told a press conference.
"Secondly, the destiny of Iraq should be determined by Iraqi
people themselves, without any interference from outside elements,"
he added.
"We are confident that the Iraqi people have the ability to
decide their fate," the admiral said.
A senior US official said Friday that Washington is willing to
work with Tehran and other governments in the region to try to oust
Saddam.
"We will certainly take support from wherever we can get it,"
said the unnamed official.
The official declined to say whether Washington had sent out
feelers to Tehran on a possible collaboration but he noted that
"Iran has, along with other neighbours, suffered particularly from
Saddam Hussein's aggressive intentions."
"There is a common interest there in finding a way to change the
situation for the better," he said.
Iran and Iraq fought a bloody war from 1980 to 1988 and
relations between the two countries have since been cool.
President Bill Clinton last week announced that the United
States would be stepping up its assistance to Iraqi opposition
groups as part of a campaign to try to bring about a new government
in Baghdad.
The US official said the United States would be willing to
include Iran in the effort despite their 18-year estrangement
following the seizure of hostages at the US embassy in Tehran after
the 1979 revolution.
Iran has supported Shiite groups in southern Iraq and has good
relations with the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, one of the main
Kurdish groups controlling northern Iraq.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 00:28:37 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran appoints new head of interests section in Washington

TEHRAN, Nov 21 (AFP) - Iran has named a new chief of its
interests section in Washington, the official news agency IRNA
reported Saturday.
Fariborz Jahansouzan, a long-time diplomat in the United States,
will take up his duties in the office in the Pakistani embassy from
Sunday, replacing Faramarz Fathnejad.
Iran and the United States have not had formal diplomatic
relations since April 1980 after Iranian revolutionary students
stormed the US embassy in Tehran and took staff hostage for more
than a year.
The United States accuses Iran of sponsoring international
terrorism and imposed an economic embargo on the country in 1995.
Since the May 1997 election of moderate President Mohammad
Khatami there have been tentative steps towards rapprochement
between the two countries, but the moves are vehemently opposed by
Iran's powerful conservatives.
Iran's interests in the United States were represented by the
Algerian embassy until ties between Tehran and Algiers were broken
in 1993 and since then the office has been based in the Pakistani
embassy.
The United States maintains an interests section in Tehran in
the Swiss embassy.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Nov 1998 01:35:40 +0100
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran dissident leader, wife stabbed to death

FOCUS-Iran dissident leader, wife stabbed to death 04:55 p.m Nov 22,
1998 Eastern

TEHRAN, Nov 22 (Reuters) - A veteran Iranian opposition leader and his
wife, who were outspoken critics of the Islamic government, were found
stabbed to death at their home, the Iranian news agency IRNA reported on
Sunday.

It quoted police as saying Dariush Forouhar, former labour minister and
head of the small nationalist Iran Nation Party, and his wife Parvaneh
were found dead at their home in Tehran.

The Interior Ministry said in a statement police discovered the bodies
on Sunday afternoon, but that the two had been killed several hours
earlier, IRNA reported.

Police had begun a major investigation, the statement added.

Forouhar, 70, and his wife, 58, often criticised alleged violations of
human and political rights in interviews with Persian-language
programmes beamed to Iran by Western radios.

The Iran Nation Party, an illegal but tolerated secular group, publishes
a newsletter which often carries exclusive reports of alleged rights
violations.

The group had called for a boycott of last month's nationwide elections
to a powerful clerical assembly, saying democratic elections were
impossible in Iran today.

Forouhar was one of the few old-time opposition leaders who had not gone
into exile and had continued to speak out in Iran.

Hardline Islamic militants had on several occasions over the past few
years attacked meetings by Forouhar's party.

Forouhar, who spent several years in jail during the rule of the late
Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, briefly joined Islamic forces and served as
labour minister in the first government after the 1979 revolution which
toppled the shah.

But he went into opposition after fundamentalist followers of the late
revolutionary leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini consolidated their hold
on power.

Forouhar was a close associate of the late Prime Minister Mehdi
Bazargan, whose liberal Islamist cabinet served for nine months after
the revolution. In the 1950s, he was an ally of the late nationalist
leader Mohammad Mossadeq.

Several prominent exiled Iranian opposition figures have been
assassinated since 1979. Iran has denied involvement, blaming the
slayings on infighting among dissidents. Killings of opposition leaders
inside the country have been rare.

------------------------------

End of DNI-NEWS Digest - 21 Nov 1998 to 22 Nov 1998
***************************************************