Date: Apr 27, 1998 [ 0: 0: 0]

Subject: DNI-NEWS Digest - 25 Apr 1998 to 26 Apr 1998

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Subject: DNI-NEWS Digest - 25 Apr 1998 to 26 Apr 1998
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There are 9 messages totalling 900 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Britain 'not informed' of Briton's arrest in Iran
2. Iran detains Briton on spying charges
3. Can't God himself prevent anti-God rallies
4. donkey or the authorities running our country's most sensitive
broadcasting agency!
5. Shari'at (islamic laws) according to Shari'ati, Motahhari, Soroush, Abdi
6. Iranian town renews strike to protest at cleric's house arrest
7. Former US official calls for "meaningful" dialogue with Iran
8. Iran Nuclear Papers Genuine
9. Sobh: Mafia in Iran (fwd)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Sat, 25 Apr 1998 14:30:41 +0200
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Britain 'not informed' of Briton's arrest in Iran

LONDON, April 26 (AFP) - Britain said Sunday it had not been
informed of the recent reported arrest in Iran of a British citizen
on spying charges.
Questioned by AFP, the foreign office said: "We have not been
informed. We have to establish what the facts are."
The Iranian newspaper Jumhouri-Islami reported Sunday that a
British national had been arrested in Iran's Kurdistan region on
suspicion of spying.
The paper, citing an unidentified intelligence service official,
said the Briton, identified as Robert Gavin, was arrested "recently"
while he was filming army installations in a military zone.
He had confessed to being an "important" member of the British
foreign secret service MI6, it said.
During a one-week interrogation, Gavin "admitted being involved
in espionage activities in Iran and several Arab countries," it
said.
Gavin held a tourist visa and also said he was a journalist for
the BBC, said the newspaper, which is close to fundamentalist
circles in Iran.
British Foreign Secretary Robin Cook revealed last week in an
unprecedented break with traditional secrecy that MI6 had thwarted
Iranian attempts to procure British nuclear technology.


------------------------------

Date: Sat, 25 Apr 1998 14:29:27 +0200
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran detains Briton on spying charges


TEHRAN, April 26 (AFP) - A British national has been arrested in
Iran's Kurdistan region suspected of spying, the Iranian newspaper
Jumhouri-Islami reported Sunday.
The paper, citing an unidentified intelligence service official,
said the Briton, identified as Robert Gavin, was arrested "recently"
while he was filming army installations in a military zone.
He had confessed to being an "important" member of the British
foreign secret service MI6, it said.
Gavin held a tourist visa and said he was a journalist for the
BBC, said the newspaper, which is close to fundamentalist circles in
Iran.
During a one-week interrogation, Gavin "admitted being involved
in espionage activities in Iran and several Arab countries," it
said.
British Foreign Secretary Robin Cook revealed last week in an
unprecedented break with traditional secrecy that MI6 had thwarted
Iranian attempts to procure British nuclear technology.
In a speech on Thursday, Cook said MI6 and the GCHQ
communications monitoring agency had "tracked Iran's nuclear weapons
programme, and have enabled us to disrupt Iranian attempts to
procure British technology."
Relations between Britain and Iran are already strained over the
1989 death threat against British author Salman Rushdie over his
book "The Satanic Verses" which the Islamic authorities said was an
insult to Islam.


------------------------------

Date: Sun, 26 Apr 1998 14:20:49 +0100
From: Asghar Abdi <asghar@BTINTERNET.COM>
Subject: Can't God himself prevent anti-God rallies

> THIS MESSAGE IS IN MIME FORMAT. Since your mail reader does not understand
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Qods in its 'special news' column wrote that Ibrahim

Asgharzadeh in a speech at Ahwaz University said the former shah of Iran and
his father created a civil government which pushed the traditional system
prevalent during the Qajar era towards a modern and industrialized
agro-based economy.

He reiterated that the civil society was actually formed during 1941 to 1953
and that it was the powerful government of Reza Shah and his son that
satisfactorily managed the country's affairs with respect to security.

At the gathering Asgharzadeh opposed any political gatherings and said if
anybody wanted to hold a gathering, it is none of anyone's business. He
continued, "Maybe someone wants to hold protest rallies against God, What
has it got to do with anybody to prevent him from doing so, can't God
himself prevent him from committing such acts."

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<HTML>
<HEAD>
<TITLE>Can't God himself prevent anti-God rallies</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#FFFFFF">
<FONT SIZE=3D"5">Qods in its 'special news' column wrote that Ibrahim<BR>
<BR>
Asgharzadeh in a speech at Ahwaz University said the former shah of Iran an=
d his father created a civil government which pushed the traditional system =
prevalent during the Qajar era towards a modern and industrialized agro-base=
d economy. <BR>
<BR>
He reiterated that the civil society was actually formed during 1941 to 195=
3 and that it was the powerful government of Reza Shah and his son that sati=
sfactorily managed the country's affairs with respect to security.<BR>
<BR>
At the gathering Asgharzadeh opposed any political gatherings and said if a=
nybody wanted to hold a gathering, it is none of anyone's business. He conti=
nued, "Maybe someone wants to hold protest rallies against God, What ha=
s it got to do with anybody to prevent him from doing so, can't God himself =
prevent him from committing such acts."</FONT>
</BODY>
</HTML>

--MS_Mac_OE_2976445250_34318_MIME_Part--

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 26 Apr 1998 18:14:38 +0100
From: Asghar Abdi <asghar@BTINTERNET.COM>
Subject: donkey or the authorities running our country's most sensitive
broadcasting agency!

> THIS MESSAGE IS IN MIME FORMAT. Since your mail reader does not understand
this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.

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Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Life Threatening Bill
By: Zahra Ajdari

The Majlis bill segregating all health services on a gender basis
received its initial approval last Wednesday. It was the second
gender oriented proposal of its kind recently, the other being
the press bill restricting press freedom and it's coverage of women's
issues and photographs.
The above bills, forwarded by the conservative right, come at a time
when they are experiencing serious political set backs. Using
women's issues as a political weapon does not serve either the cause
of women or the national interest.
The people expect the Executive and the Legislature to work close-ly
together in formulating laws. Although it is the prerogative of the
Legislature to pass laws, it needs to consult the Executive on matters
of feasibility. A law which cannot be fully implemented and does not
bring about the intended result of its authors, will only hinder effec-tive
administration and public confidence.
The proposed health bill is a utopian vision which can only be real-ized
in a prosperous society, with 100% medical coverage, and a
medical system that can afford to be split into segregated sectors.
It is irresponsible to pass laws without proper appropriation espe-cially
when our national budget is drastically reduced due to the fall
in the price of oil to $12 a barrel. Moreover, anyone having visited
any one of our health establishments can attest to its strained
resources. Although the proposed bill will affect everyone, it is the
women who would be the primary victims, as culturally the better
part of our resources are usually designed for men.
Iran is commended internationally for providing reasonable health
care for the neediest segment of its population. We should not under-mine
our achievements in this field.
The primary consideration in enacting laws for health services must
be saving lives. This is a life threatening bill with grave conse-quences.
It is the responsibility of government to protect the life of it's
citizens, which includes proper medical care. The proposed bill is an
obstacle in that pursuit.

BITTERSWEET BANANUTS
Jame'eh's 'Fifth Columnist'
and 'The Animal that Knew Too Much!'
Aunty Chestnut: Quite comparable to your 'Bittersweet' column, dear
Uncle Almond, which is, judged by the feedback, one of the most read columns
in English dailies of our country, the new Persian newspaper
Jame'eh's daily satirical 'Fifth Column', by Seyyed Ebrahim Nabavi,
has gained popularity in no time.
Uncle Almond: Thank you for bringing up the issue, which first of all
calls for a big 'CONGRATULATIONS' to our new satirist colleague,
and meanwhile solves our own problem of finding a worthy topic for our
own weekly column! And let's congratulate Mr. Nabavi once again for
finding worthy issues to talk about everyday, while we sometimes run
short of ideas for our once-a-week column!
Aunty Chestnut: I'm glad a woman has, once again, solved two of your
problems my old friend! Should we talk about the two women-related
prohibitions proposed by the Majlis deputies, one about the prohibition on
treatment of female patients by male doctors and male hospital staff and
vice versa, and the other, about the proposed appendix to the 'Press Law',
which calls for abstaining from discussing issues related to women,
which may raise social conflicts?
Uncle Almond: You always have plenty of great, satire- oriented ideas
lady, and both those topics deserve a thorough tackling. Yet, like I said
earlier, I'd rather we stuck to one of our new Fifth Column satirist's
recent,
great ideas. This will complete our praise for him, and rid ourselves of
the burden of 'thinking'!
Aunty Chestnut: All right nutty nut uncle. The decision, as always, is
yours. But thinking is not that difficult a task, at least for us female
folks!
Uncle Almond: That make the score 'three-nil' in favor of ladies Aunty
Chestnut! Now will you please permit me to narrate Nabavi's tale of 'The
Donkey That Knew Too Much'?!
Aunty Chestnut: Sounds as great as the 'Nuts That Know Too Much' man.
I hope it has a happy ending too, because what happens to a donkey
who knew too much can easily also happen to nuts who do!
Uncle Almond: I hate to disappoint you dear aunty, but it doesn't. Here it
is anyhow: "IRIB's Channel One radio, broadcast a two-part radio play on
March 25 and 26, starting at ten o'clock, entitled 'The Donkey That Knew Too
Much'
"A young superstitious man finds a (good looking!) donkey and takes it
home. The man's brother-in-law, who is a computer engineer finds a few
computer diskettes and CDs, professionally embedded inside the donkey's
neat, leather necklace. When he inserts them in his PC, to his great
astonishment, he discovers that the donkey which his brother-in-law has
found has gone through several tech-no-biological operations, which have
enabled it to record the sights and sounds around it on the diskettes and
CDs around its neck. Stranger than that, the donkey's devices could also
'read people's minds' and report all these things to its American masters at
the CIA!
"Finally, when the latest US conspiracy is unveiled, and just when the
'Bionic Donkey' (?!) is surrounded by the IRGC forces, it is blown up by its
American inventors using a remote-control device activated by a satellite!"
Aunty Chestnut: Wow! Donkeys are the symbol of the 'Democrats' in the
US aren't they?
Uncle Almond: They sure are dear aunty, but in our own language it is
the symbol of something else and we fully agree with Jame'eh's satirist,
that
this symbol better befits some of the authorities running our country's most
sensitive broadcasting agency!
Abu Banana

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<HTML>
<HEAD>
<TITLE>donkey or the authorities running our country's most sensitive broad=
casting agency!</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#FFFFFF">
<FONT SIZE=3D"4"><B>Life Threatening Bill<BR>
</B><I>By: Zahra Ajdari<BR>
</I><BR>
The Majlis bill segregating all health services on a gender basis<BR>
received its initial approval last Wednesday. It was the second<BR>
gender oriented proposal of its kind recently, the other being<BR>
the press bill restricting press freedom and it's coverage of women's<BR>
issues and photographs.<BR>
The above bills, forwarded by the conservative right, come at a time<BR>
when they are experiencing serious political set backs. Using<BR>
women's issues as a political weapon does not serve either the cause<BR>
of women or the national interest.<BR>
The people expect the Executive and the Legislature to work close-ly<BR>
together in formulating laws. Although it is the prerogative of the<BR>
Legislature to pass laws, it needs to consult the Executive on matters<BR>
of feasibility. A law which cannot be fully implemented and does not<BR>
bring about the intended result of its authors, will only hinder effec-tive=
<BR>
administration and public confidence.<BR>
The proposed health bill is a utopian vision which can only be real-ized<BR=
>
in a prosperous society, with 100% medical coverage, and a<BR>
medical system that can afford to be split into segregated sectors.<BR>
It is irresponsible to pass laws without proper appropriation espe-cially<B=
R>
when our national budget is drastically reduced due to the fall<BR>
in the price of oil to $12 a barrel. Moreover, anyone having visited<BR>
any one of our health establishments can attest to its strained<BR>
resources. Although the proposed bill will affect everyone, it is the<BR>
women who would be the primary victims, as culturally the better<BR>
part of our resources are usually designed for men.<BR>
Iran is commended internationally for providing reasonable health<BR>
care for the neediest segment of its population. We should not under-mine<B=
R>
our achievements in this field.<BR>
The primary consideration in enacting laws for health services must<BR>
be saving lives. This is a life threatening bill with grave conse-quences.<=
BR>
It is the responsibility of government to protect the life of it's<BR>
citizens, which includes proper medical care. The proposed bill is an<BR>
obstacle in that pursuit.<BR>
<BR>
</FONT><FONT SIZE=3D"5"><B>BITTERSWEET BANANUTS<BR>
<FONT COLOR=3D"#FF0099">Jame'eh's 'Fifth Columnist'<BR>
and 'The Animal that Knew Too Much!'</B></FONT></FONT><FONT SIZE=3D"4"><BR>
<B>Aunty Chestnut: </B>Quite comparable to your <I>'Bittersweet</I>' column=
, dear<BR>
Uncle Almond, which is, judged by the feedback, one of the most read column=
s in English dailies of our country, the new Persian newspaper<BR>
Jame'eh's daily satirical <I><!?>'Fifth Column</I><!?>', by Seyyed Ebrahim Nabavi,<=
BR>
has gained popularity in no time.<BR>
<B>Uncle Almond: </B>Thank you for bringing up the issue, which first of al=
l<BR>
calls for a big 'CONGRATULATIONS' to our new satirist colleague,<BR>
and meanwhile solves our own problem of finding a worthy topic for our<BR>
own weekly column! And let's congratulate Mr. Nabavi once again for<BR>
finding worthy issues to talk about everyday, while we sometimes run<BR>
short of ideas for our once-a-week column!<BR>
<B>Aunty Chestnut: </B>I'm glad a woman has, once again, solved two of your=
<BR>
problems my old friend! Should we talk about the two women-related<BR>
prohibitions proposed by the Majlis deputies, one about the prohibition on<=
BR>
treatment of female patients by male doctors and male hospital staff and<BR=
>
vice versa, and the other, about the proposed appendix to the 'Press Law',<=
BR>
which calls for abstaining from discussing issues related to women,<BR>
which may raise social conflicts?<BR>
<B>Uncle Almond: </B>You always have plenty of great, satire- oriented idea=
s<BR>
lady, and both those topics deserve a thorough tackling. Yet, like I said e=
arlier, I'd rather we stuck to one of our new <I>Fifth Column </I>satirist's=
recent,<BR>
great ideas. This will complete our praise for him, and rid ourselves of<BR=
>
the burden of 'thinking'!<BR>
<B>Aunty Chestnut: </B>All right nutty nut uncle. The decision, as always, =
is<BR>
yours. But thinking is not that difficult a task, at least for us female fo=
lks!<BR>
<B>Uncle Almond: </B>That make the score 'three-nil' in favor of ladies Aun=
ty<BR>
Chestnut! Now will you please permit me to narrate Nabavi's tale of 'The<BR=
>
Donkey <I>That Knew Too Much'?!<BR>
</I><B>Aunty Chestnut: </B>Sounds as great as the <I>'Nuts That Know Too Mu=
ch' man</I>.<BR>
I hope it has a happy ending too, because what happens to a donkey<BR>
who knew too much can easily also happen to nuts who do!<BR>
<B>Uncle Almond</B>: I hate to disappoint you dear aunty, but it doesn't. H=
ere it<BR>
is anyhow: "IRIB's Channel One radio, broadcast a two-part radio play =
on March 25 and 26, starting at ten o'clock, entitled <I>'The Donkey That Kn=
ew Too<BR>
Much'<BR>
</I>"A young superstitious man finds a (good looking!) donkey and take=
s it<BR>
home. The man's brother-in-law, who is a computer engineer finds a few<BR>
computer diskettes and CDs, professionally embedded inside the donkey's<BR>
neat, leather necklace. When he inserts them in his PC, to his great<BR>
astonishment, he discovers that the donkey which his brother-in-law has<BR>
found has gone through several tech-no-biological operations, which have<BR=
>
enabled it to record the sights and sounds around it on the diskettes and<B=
R>
CDs around its neck. Stranger than that, the donkey's devices could also<BR=
>
'read people's minds' and report all these things to its American masters a=
t<BR>
the CIA!<BR>
"Finally, when the latest US conspiracy is unveiled, and just when the=
<BR>
'Bionic Donkey' (?!) is surrounded by the IRGC forces, it is blown up by it=
s<BR>
American inventors using a remote-control device activated by a satellite!&=
quot;<BR>
<B>Aunty Chestnut: </B>Wow! Donkeys are the symbol of the 'Democrats' in th=
e<BR>
US aren't they?<BR>
<B>Uncle Almond: </B>They sure are dear aunty, but in our own language it i=
s<BR>
the symbol of something else and we fully agree with Jame'eh's satirist, th=
at<BR>
this symbol better befits some of the authorities running our country's mos=
t<BR>
sensitive broadcasting agency!<BR>
<B><I>Abu Banana</I></B></FONT>
</BODY>
</HTML>

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------------------------------

Date: Sun, 26 Apr 1998 20:37:01 +0100
From: Asghar Abdi <asghar@BTINTERNET.COM>
Subject: Shari'at (islamic laws) according to Shari'ati, Motahhari, Soroush,
Abdi

mqaysh ay byn andySh hay Sryety, mThry v dktr srvS tvsT dktr srvS
ayn mTlb KlaCh Sdh az mqalh¡ Sryety v Sryet (sKnrany dktr srvS dr danSkdh
fny thran dr taryK byst v svm Krdad hzar v syCd v hftad v sh) ast kh dr ktab
mdara v mdyryt bh Gap rsydh ast.

Sryety dr dyn sh Gyz ra my jst: 1- eSq v erfan, 2- Azady 3- brabry.
az nXr vy, eSq v erfan dGar Aft tCvf Sdh v bh drvn grayy mnHT tbdyl Sdh v
Syvh Kanqah bazy br eSq v erfan svar gSth v erfan bh jay aynkh AzadybKS baSd
asart Avr Sdh bvd, hmGnankh òHafX Syrazyå az ejb Kanqahy, az trSrvyy zahdanh
v az by emly ealman glh my krd. Azady hm Alvdh bh srmayh dary Sdh bvd v
brabry v edalt nyz Alvdh bh andySh¡ marksysty bvd.
Sryety Sayd barztryn Ghrh dr taryK frhng ma baSd kh Armanhay fradyny v byrvn
dyny Kvd ra ASkara byan krdh v andySh v fhm dyny Kvd ra br Armanhay byrvn
dyny bna nhadh ast.
Sryety bh dyn tqlydy bavr ndaSth v dyn ra fqT bray cvab aKrvy nmy Kvast,
blkh AnGh ra kh hmh¡ rvSnfkran my Kvahnd dr dyn my jst.
dr mfhvm jameh Snasy, jameh Snas vjvd eyny v taryKy v byrvny dyn ra mvrd
brrsy qrar my dhd vly elm klam v erfan bh mahyt v bh rvH pyamy kh az naHyh
pyambr v Sare bh dst mrdm rsydh ast my prdazd.
mearfy kh hr pyambr erxh my knd ba mHyT jQrafya, ajtmae v frhng KaC mrdm An
naHyh v An zman artbaT dard. mcla erby bvdn zban qrAn naSy az mbevc Sdn vy
dr mHyT erby ast.
taryK hr dyny parh ay az dyn v nmaySgah Anst v rjve bh An bray fhm emyqtr
dyn lazm ast vly nbayd br sr Hvadc taryKy bh nzae brKasth v az mjray aCly
andySh v merft dyny dvr aftad, v Talban fhm dqyq dyn v vHdt mslmyn bayd bh
ayn amr tvjh knnd. gvhr dyn ebartst az pyamhay pyambr bdvn tvjh bh SrayT
frhngy v mHyTy v ajtmaey v taryKy.

Ser SyK mHmvd Sbstry:
Sryet pvst, mQz Amd Hqyqt myan ayn v An baSd Tryqt
vly ta ba Kvdy znhar, znhar ebarat Sryet ra ngh dar

earfan v Cvfyan Kvd ra ahl mQz (Hqayq v kmalat v aHvalat SKCy) v fqyhan ra
ahl pvst v qSr (Sraye v aHkam v Adab Xahry) pndaSth v gman daSth and kh mQz
Anha ra az pvst by nyaz my knd.

mcnvy nmvnh hayy az antqad erfa bh qSr grayan ra Avrdh ast:
-bayzyd my Kvast bh Hj brvd. dr rah Hj, dr Shrha my gSt v az anha ebvr my
krd nvea sraQ pyr v mrSydy ra my grft. dr yky az Shrha bh av nSan dadnd kh
pyr rvSn xmyry dr Anja hst. bray bhrh brdn az mHxr av bh dydarS Staft. An
pyr bh bayzyd gft kh eazm kjayy? av gft; eazm Hj am. gft: Gqdr pvl dary? av
gft flan mqdar pvl dvyst drm nqrh) dr gvSh¡ qbay mn bsth ast. bayzyd gft kh
nyazy nyst bh mkh brvy. dvr mn Tvaf kn. agr An Kanh¡ sngy v gly abrahym dr
mkh Kanh¡ Kdast, dl mn hm Kanh¡ Kdast. Kda az zman bnay An Kanh yk bar hm dr
An Kanh nrfth ast ama hyG vqt Kanh¡ dl mra trk nkrdh v hmvarh dr An Haxr ast
ps bdan kh Tvaf mn brtr az Hj ast. bayzyd An ra qbvl krd (Hj bayzyd, mcnvy,
dftr dvm, abyat 2240).
-bexy erfa metqdnd kh ksy kh vaCl bh Hqyqt baSd az pyrvy aHkam Sryet by nyaz
ast v ayn mHx dyndary ast.
-CHabh pyambr nyazy bh HfX qrAn ndaStnd kh amry qSry ast (mcnvy, dftr svm,
1386).
-fel v Taet gvah br ayman ast v mvmnan nyazy bh gvah ndarnd. (mcnvy, dftr
pnjm, byt 183).
-danstn Sryet bray yary bh dygran v telym Anha mvrd nyaz ast v bs (mcnvy,
dftr svm, byt 1403).
drst ast kh qSr HafX mQz ast v bh dvr andaKtn qSr ma ra bh tdryj az mQz hm
mHrvm my knd vly nbayd gman knym kh eml bh aHkam mvjb edl my Svd, blkh aHkam
ajtmaey dyny tabe edl and nh edl tabe Anha. bh ebart dygr fqT aHkam eadlanh
aslamy hstnd v nmy tvan hr Hkm mnsvb bh aslam ra eadlanh Kvand. bayd danst
kh qSr bray mQz ast v agr bh mQz Kyant knd bayd brkndh Svd.
albth bexy az mdeyan mQzKvahy v mQz Snasy, bh Aft abaHygry dGar Sdnd, v parh
ay az Cvfyan, tfsyrha v tavylhay fvq aleadh gzaf v dlKvah v by prva az mearf
dyny krdnd kh gvahy br nabvdy mQz dr Qyab qSr ast v az dyn jz yk rSth
tfsyrhay dlbKvah v gzaf v dvr az Hqyqt baqy nKvahd mand.
Hkyman v bzrgany Gvn bvely syna v Kvajh nCyraldyn Tvsy metqd bh tfkyk qSr v
mQz bvdnd v metqd bvdnd kh pyambr bray mrdm yk pyam daSt ama bray HfX taryKy
v ajtmaey An v bray aynkh An pyam dr dlha mandgar bmand yk rSth pvsth¡ mHafX
bray An pdyd Avrd. Anan nmaz, Taeat, Hj, rvzh v tmam aynha ra bh mnzlh¡
pvsth¡ mHafXy my danstnd kh fy almcl yad Kda ra dr Admy zndh ngh my dard.
kafy nyst kh Admy bgvyd kh mn bh yad Kda hstm v bh av rsydh am v bh hyG emly
aHtyaj ndarm.
mSkl msyHyt dr Qrb mKalftS ba elm nyst blkh brdaSth Sdn pvsth¡ mHafX dyn
ast. yk mQz bdvn pvst ast. mHbt alhy v eSq Kdavndy dr Anja bh fravany trvyj
v tblyQ my Svd v ksany kh ba An jvame v ba An frhngha ASna hstnd bdrsty ayn
mena ra my dannd kh Kdavnd az yadha nrfth ast, dr klysaha bray mvmnan daima
Zkr Kda, srvdhay eaSqanh nsbt bh Kda v bh msyH Kvandh v trvyj my Svd, ama
AnGh kmtr dr Anja vjvd dard- v lZa ayn tZkarha ra by acr v km acr my knd-
ebart ast az fqdan An pvsth¡ mHafX v AnGh ma az Anha bh nam Taeat dyny yad
my knym. Gyzy kh Hty agr ksy az sr mlalt v by myly anjamSan bdhd v Hty agr
Qayt Anha ra ndand, Hty agr nfhmd kh bray Gh nmaz v dea my Kvand ya rvzh my
gyrd baz hm vajb ast. bray aynkh Agahanh ya naAgahanh dr daKl ayn pvsth An
mQz mTlvb HfX Svd (v agr bh GSm ajtmaey bh ayn msilh nXr knym, CdqS ASkartr
v tCdyqS Asantr Kvahd bvd). ayn ast sr Ankh Taeat vajb and v SKC mvmn v
mtdyn my bayd hman ahtmamy ra kh bh mQz dard bh ayn qSr hm bvrzd. qSr ra
knar zdn v nadydh grftn ma ra az hr dvy Anha mHrvm Kvahd krd v ayn mSkly ast
kh rhbran v mtfkran dyny yk jameh hmySh bayd nsbt bh An Hsas baSnd.
dktr Sryety br mQz dyn v Armanhay dyny v bh Tvr kly òerfan v eSq, brabry v
Azadyå takyd my vrzyd v elyrQm Hmlat SdydS bh qSryvn v pasdaran qSr dyn,
tvjh Gndany bh qSr dyn ndaSt. albth aySan tfkyk Xrf v mXrvf ra my krd v
takyd my krd kh mqCvdS tHvl dr aCl mearf dyny nyst blkh dr Xrvfy ast kh
mXrvfat dr Anha ryKth my Svnd.
Sryety bh sh fre az frve aHkam dyny takyd byStr daSt v Anha ra mhmtryn v
msivlyt Afryn tryn aHkam dyny my Smrd. jhad, Hj v amr bh mervf v nhy az
mnkr. vy nmadyn bvdn Hj ra mTrH krdh v sey dr byrvn kSydn meany nhfth dr dl
ayn nmadha bvd v takyd my krd kh Hj bdvn tvjh bh ayn meny nmadyn, by mnTq
tryn rftar bSry ast v nmy tvan az An dfae krd. Sryety sey dr kndn pvst Hj v
nSan dadn mQz An bvd. dr mvrd mady bvdn jhad v amr bh mervf nyazy bh tvxyH
nyst. az ayn nXr, kar Sryety dr prdaKtn bh mQz bh jay pvst Sbyh kar earfan
bvdh ast, ba ayn tfavt kh Sryety br msivlyt ajtmaey nyz takyd my krd. az nXr
Sryety, aHkam v bnahay ajtmaey dyn bray HfX hsth An nyst (amcal bvely kh Hj
v jhad ra HafX tvHyd my danstnd), blkh hsth dyn yeny tvHyd bh ajtmae v meySt
mTlvb mdd my rsannd. bh ebart dygr, agr Sryety dnya v AKrt ra yky dansth v
my gft kh dyny kh bh drd qbl az mrg nKvrd bh drd ps az mrg nyz nmy Kvrd hdf
jabh ja krdn jay hsth v pvsth bvd. ayn nve dyn grayy bray mtfkran v mHqqan
daray jaZbh bvdh vly mvrd aetrax Hamlan fhm klasyk az dyn bvd. Sryety aslam
abvZr (aydivlvJy) ra br aslam abvely (frhng) trjyH my dad. aslam aydivlvJyk
(abvZry) Sryety rvSn v by abham bvdh v dr An az Hyrt v raz v tebd naAgahanh
Kbry nyst. qSrha Sfaf bvdh v mQzha ra nSan my dhnd v ayn rvSnfkran ra bh eml
Agahanh vamydard. vly akcr mrdm dyndar az dydn hsth¡ eryan v bdvn pvsth vHSt
my knnd.
aslam rvSnfkranh aslam Agahanh¡ mHqqanh ay ra tvam ba takyd br mQz araih my
dhd. brd aynkar mHdvd ast v nfvZ An dr myan tvdh mannd nfvZ erfan mHdvd bh
KvaC Kvahd bvd. v evam An ra nKvahnd psndyd v QvQay Anha Klaf antXar nyst.
Sryety bh elt mKalftS ba rvHanyvn (yky az axlae mclc zvr v zr v tzvyr) takyd
Gndany br qSr nmy krd Gvn nmy tvan mrdm ra az svyy bh svy rvHanyvny rand v
az svy dygr az Anha antqad krd. Sryety mQz dyn ra my Kvast, v Gvn qSr dyn dr
dst rvHanyvny bvd kh nh dyn Snas bvdnd v nh CalH, lZa takyd kmy br Sryet
daSt.
mrHvm mThry dr mqalh¡ òmSkl asasy rvHanytå tz òaslam mnhay AKvndå ra yk tz
astemary Kyantkaranh nsbt bh andySh¡ dyny my danst v mKaTb vy hmfkran dktr
ely Sryety bvd. Gvn dktr Sryety dr mjmveh Acar Smarh¡ yk (ba mKaTbhay ASna)
CryHa pyS byny krdh ast kh òaslam Ayndh, aslam mnhay AKvndå Kvahd bvd.
albth Sryety bh elmay dyn bh envan mtKCCan andySh¡ dyny aHtram my gZaSt v bh
mqam Anha metrf bvd vly av ba rvHanyvny mntqd bvd kh dfae az dyn ra ba dfae
az mnafe mSrve v namSrveSan grh zdh bvdnd v fhmSan az aHkam dyn hm dr dayrh¡
tng mnafe v jhan byny San mHCvr mandh bvd.
Sryety bh CraHt my gft kh aCly tryn sKnS mKalft ba òmlkå v òmalkå v òmlaå ya
mclc tyQ v Tla v tsbyH ya zr v zvr v tzvyr ast v bs. v KvdS takyd my krd kh
òhr Gh Qyr az ayn gfth am, zaid gfth am.å ba ayn tivry aySan nmy tvanst mrdm
ra bh sraQ mlaha jht yadgyry frve dyn bknd, Gvn Cdha eyb dr pasdaran frve
dyn mShvd bvd.
mThry ayn mSkl ra ndaSt Gvn vy rvHanyt ra drKty Aft Kvrdh my danst vly metqd
bvd kh ayn drKt bayd bmand v aClaH Svd.
Sryety tklyf KvdS ra ba Sryet (frve v aHkam dyn) Hl nkrdh ast v fqT bh tbyyn
An bKS az qSr dyn prdaKth kh mQz br Anha Qalb ast mannd Hj, jhad, amr bh
mervf v nhy az mnkr.
ma (hmfkran dktr srvS) dyndarany hstym kh myKvahym hm Xahr dyn (qSr) v hm bh
baTn dyn (mQz) HfX Svd v Sma bh ksany kh nsbt bh Xvahr dyn by aetnayy my
knnd aetmad nknyd v nyz bh Anhayy kh fqT bh Xvahr my prdaznd aetmad nknyd.
Kdavnd bray An gvhr (mQz dyn) Hqh ay (qSr) nhadh ast v Hqh v gvhr hr dv ezyz
hstnd v qSr hm Hajb mQz ast v hm Kadm v HafX qSr. earf Anst kh Hjab ra nbynd
nh aynkh Hjab ra bdrd.

nXryh (aCQr ebdy): hr menayy ra dr qalby bayd ryKt. ma nbayd kh qalb hay
dyny (frve dyn) ra bh bhanh¡ HfX mQz dyn tHt envan snt mHmdy HfX krd. bayd
pyam dyn ra az lablay adyan alhy astKraj v dr qalbhay mnasb az nXr zmany v
mkany ryKt. amyd ast kh tkyh¡ dktr srvS br HfX qSr dyn yk tqyh¡ dyny baSd
,v nh yk ayman qlby.

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 25 Apr 1998 23:27:49 +0200
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iranian town renews strike to protest at cleric's house arrest


TEHRAN, April 26 (AFP) - Shopkeepers and schools in a central
Iranian town have gone on strike to protest at restrictions on
dissident senior cleric Ayatollah Hossein-Ali Montazeri for
criticizing Iran's supreme leader, a newspaper reported Sunday.
Farda (Tomorrow) said shops at the baazar and schools in
Najafabad, Montazeri's home town, were closed Saturday in protest at
his house arrest in the holy city of Qom, also in central Iran.
Shopkeepers have gone on strike several times in the past month
to voice support for the cleric, the disgraced former designated
heir to the late Iranian leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.
Montazeri has been under increased police surveillance in Qom
since November when he criticized leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei for
dominating political affairs.
The conservative paper warned that the strike could continue in
the coming days and criticized the authorities for their "lax"
attitude.


------------------------------

Date: Sat, 25 Apr 1998 23:28:15 +0200
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Former US official calls for "meaningful" dialogue with Iran


TEHRAN, April 26 (AFP) - Former US assistant secretary of state
Richard Murphy has called for "meaningful and clear" official
dialogue between the United States and Iran to pave the way for
normalized relations.
"The sooner there can be meaningful and clear official exchanges
between the two governments the better," Murphy said in an interview
with the English-language daily Iran News published on Sunday.
"I do see a great value in educational and cultural exchanges,
but what is needed is a clear understanding of each other's
positions," he said.
"There is a need for a clear understanding between the two
governments of the gestures they could make to signal their serious
desire for better relations," added Murphy, who served under former
president Ronald Reagan from 1983-1989 as assistant secretary of
state for the Middle East.
He is now a private consultant and a senior fellow on the Middle
East at the Council on (Eds: correct) Foreign Relations, a New
York-based think-tank.
Murphy said both governments faced "limits to how far and the
speed with which they can move" toward rapprochement. "The clearer
their understanding of each other's inhibitions and constraints the
better it is."
He criticized the "lack of creativity, imagination and hard
work" in the United States in the past over its relations with
Iran.
"There hasn't been much thought given to Iran in Washington,
except to think of the country as a danger to the area," Murphy said
in a rare interview with the Iranian press.
Tehran and Washington broke diplomatic ties in 1980, shortly
after the Islamic revolution which toppled the pro-American shah,
and they have been enemies ever since.
In January, however, President Mohammad Khatami made a televised
address to the American people, calling for cultural exchanges,
though not official dialogue, to "crack the wall of mistrust."
Murphy spoke of a "new perception in the United states of a
positive direction" in Iran since Khatami's election last May.
"Now a ferment has started ... There are people in the
administration who who want to move on, though slowly," he said.
"Greater activism from American businesses, notably the oil
sector," has also influenced the "change of attitude" towards Tehran
in Washington, he said.
Murphy criticized US sanctions against Iran, arguing that they
had "hurt American companies wanting to do business with Iran" and
denied the Islamic republic access to "certain products and
technology."
The United States, which regards Iran as an outlaw nation and
seeks to isolate it, imposed an economic embargo on the Islamic
republic in June 1995. A year later, Washington adopted a law
threatening to punish foreign firms doing business with Iran's oil
and gas sector.
But several US allies have resisted the measures and the US
government has come under growing pressure from its own businesses
to lift the ban on trade with the Islamic republic.
Murphy acknowledged however that the two countries have a long
way to go to normalize relations.
"Relations can not be improved quickly because both sides have
very unpleasant memories about each other. But I think the two
countries' leaders should start laying the foundation for a
healthier relationship," he said.


------------------------------

Date: Sun, 26 Apr 1998 17:38:10 -0400
From: Fereydoun Taslimi <fereydoun@NOOR.ORG>
Subject: Re: Iran Nuclear Papers Genuine

Experts: Iran Nuclear Papers Genuine
By STEVE RODAN
Jerusalem Post, Friday, April 24, 1998
JERUSALEM (April 24) - Government experts have deemed as genuine
Iranian government documents obtained from the US that report Teheran's
receipt of nuclear devices from Kazahkstan in 1992.
A senior government official said yesterday that the documents have
been inspected by several intelligence sources and the assessment is that
the Iranian correspondence is not a forgery.
"The feeling is that we are dealing with authentic material," the
official, who refused to be identified, said. Israeli experts have been
studying the documents for several weeks since they were relayed by Labor
MK Rafi Elul. For his part, however, Elul said Israel had received another
copy of the same documents in 1995 but had not published them.
A congressional source said documents that report Iran receiving at
least two nuclear devices from Kazakhstan have been held by the House
National Security Committee. The source said a debate raged within the US
intelligence community whether the documents were forged by the Iranian
opposition movement.
Last week, two US House members, Bill McCollum (R, Florida) and James
Saxton (R, New Jersey) told The Jerusalem Post that the evidence they've
seen led them to conclude that Iran has nuclear weapons parts and supplies
from the former Soviet Union republics in Central Asia.
A US analyst with extensive connections in the US intelligence
community said government nuclear experts, including those in the CIA and
Energy Department, are convinced that Iran has some sort of a
non-operational nuclear device. But until now they can't prove it.
Rep. Curt Weldon, (R, Pennsylvania), who chairs the Research and
Development subcommittee of the House National Security Committee, said he
plans to "make a major case on the Hill" regarding a report in The Post
earlier this month that Iran obtained nuclear weapons in 1992.
Weldon was quoted by Aerospace Daily , published in Washington, as
saying, "This is a very dangerous situation if what the Israeli press is
saying is true, and it will be a major problem for us because it means not
only that Iran within 12 months from now [will have] medium range
missiles, but it will also have a warhead to put onto that missile."

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 27 Apr 1998 13:01:11 +1000
From: Mehdi Ardalan <mardalan@LAUREL.OCS.MQ.EDU.AU>
Subject: Sobh: Mafia in Iran (fwd)

Here's an extremely interesting interview that sheds light on the Rightist
faction's backlash against the (currently) proKhatami forces who are not
as weak as it might be assumed in countering what some call a silent coup
against the President, that is if the interviewee's statements are accurate.




Sobh (# 81, April 21 - May 21)

Rasulinejad: Let Us not Permit Economic-Political Mafia Take over
Everything

Rasulinejad is one of the outspoken members of the Islamic Majlis.
He represents Damavand and Firoozkuh. He always has some points and
analyses about the problems the society is facing. He gave an
interview to our reporter:

Q: The Islamic Majlis has two important responsibilities of
legislation and supervision over the executive affairs. How
successful has the Majlis been in performing the latter?

A: If you consider the pre-agenda speeches by the MPs, their
questions from the ministers and various cases of the inquiries and
probes you will realize that the MPs are sensitive about the
executive affairs and are pursuing that responsibility.

Q: Do the probes and inquiries end upon reading the related reports
at public sessions?

A: In the past reading a report was the conclusion of an inquiry and
probe, but now the policy has changed and if there has been any
violation the case will be sent to the judiciary.

Q: Have there been any cases sent to the judiciary?

A: As far as I can remember the case of the Kermanshah (War)
Reconstruction HQ case has been sent to the judiciary. But no
judgment has been issued although several years has passed. Of course
this itself is a weak point.

Q: What about the inquiries and probes into the Radio and Television
(IRIB), the Mostazafan and Janbazan Foundation and...?

A: In such instances - i.e. centers which are under the supervision
of the esteemed Leader, as a rule cases are sent to His Eminence's
office before their being given to the judiciary. The instances you
referred to are going through such phases.

Q: In the past few months Sobh disclosed some documents indicating
extensive violations by two ministers and their subordinates. But
that did not have any echo at the Majlis and not even one MP was
prepared to adopt a stand on those reports in his pre-agenda speech.
Why?

A: Regrettably a fundamental problem in our society overshadowed the
exposures by Sobh. The problem is making the issue political and the
factional support for violators.

About the Tehran mayor or district mayors you are witnessing how by
political hue and cry efforts are being made so that violators and
plunderers of public wealth can escape the law.

Q: Why were the MPs silent on the documented exposures by Sobh or
other publications, but they are making speeches, wringing letters,
holding sessions and doing other things in support of the violating
mayors?

A: I said in (The Majlis) speech in the past that a political and
economic Mafia has found shape in Iran. The Iranian Mafia which has
plenty of financial and political support tries to overshadow such
instances by making use of the media and publications it has.

For instance you see that there are a number of big capitalists -
tower builders, factory-owners and contractors - on side of every
violating mayor who are supporting him.

This Mafia, which has been formed by capitalists and some
gentlemen's children, by using its wealth and power, intends to take
over all the affairs and this is truly a catastrophe. This is why you
see that exposures by committed publications such as Sobh face
silence and big violations at the Tehran Municipality are protected
by the political figures.

The political and economic Mafia, which I believe, has found shape
in Iran is growing and it has penetrated everywhere and many centers.
With such an establishment one must not be surprised at the silence
before the exposures by Sobh or the hue and cry in support of the
Tehran mayor. One should instead reflect, sense the danger and
consider a solution.

Q: Why are you not taking any step to expose this Mafia you are
talking about?

A: I have not been silent. Incidentally I have tried a lot to expose
them. But regrettably the press did not cooperate. Consider how I can
state my points when a newspaper such as Ettela'at is not publishing
even one sentence of my pre-agenda speeches (Etteal'at as a policy
has not been reporting the pre-agenda speeches of the Majlis since
some time ago)? You can see that unfortunately efforts are being made
to silence the press by threats or promise of rewards and to make it
write in the direction of the interests of a specific stratum and
this is a catastrophe.

If the committed reporters and writers sell their pens there will be
a catastrophe and at that time not even Sobh will survive to perform
its revolutionary and religious mission.

Therefore, I have not been silent, but the press has not been
prepared to publish my points.

Q: Do you think that Mafia has connection with other countries?

A: That is certainly the case. We have reliable reports that some of
the (foreign) embassies are making moves, which are outside the
diplomatic norms. They have relations, which are very questionable.
This is why I warn the foreign minister to watch those moves and
consider a solution for the steps which are considered incompatible
with diplomatic norms.

To expose the Mafia I have to give an example here. You see that it
has been for some time that they are discussing talks with the U.S.
Or a newspaper is writing that we should put having relations with
the U.S. to referendum. Or American wrestlers are invited to Iran and
some spectators are taken to welcome them. And in a planned move they
applauded the defeated American wrestler.

I declare it here that (those spectators) were not Iranians. They
were the agents of the Mafia which in continuation of its move wants
to materialize "compromise."

I also have to speak about the invitation of an influential and
famous American figure to Iran. The report on that was given
everywhere except in Iran. Because precisely when that American pawn,
who is considered among the theoreticians of imperialism, was to
arrive they staged the March 2 disturbance outside Tehran University
to divert the attention and overshadow the news of the arrival of the
American.

A number of MPs and I are going to ask the foreign minister shortly
which center invited him and for what purpose and why the news of
that was not given anywhere.

Q: Does this mean the March 2 affair was a calculated move to cover
up a more important thing?

A: Exactly. They gave the permission for it with the knowledge that
it would lead to a controversy and they took in many.

For instance they took in the Radio and Television and the gentlemen
in the 45 Minutes program instead of discussing the trip of an
American pawn discussed the March 2 affair and overshadowed
everything by that.

Q: You said that this Mafia is economic and political. That means it
has economic and political goals. Do you believe the Mafia in mind
has recruited members from among the existing factions or from one of
them?

A: I have no doubts that it has recruited members. Otherwise why
should a contractor lavish tens of millions of rails on a mayor or
why should one spend hundreds of millions of rials to became a member
of the Majlis. After all what does the Majlis have that they are
spending like that to enter it?

When one looks at them one becomes certain that they are not people
for duty. In principle they do not agree to many of the foundations.
Then why are they trying to enter the Majlis? It is because they want
to secure political backing.

Why did capitalists spend tens of millions of rials on certain
individuals in the Fifth Majlis elections? It was because they wanted
to recruit members and regrettably they did that.

Q: Some time ago you protested against the appointment of Mr. Ali
Hashemi at the Oil Ministry. Why?

A: One of the slogans of Mr. Khatami was meritocracy. Therefore he
should be after appointment of the most merited individuals. If Mr.
Zanganeh believes in the President's slogans he should not have
appointed that person. Because he has some problems in the affair of
the Tehran Municipality case and in some other places. And it is
completely evident that he is not in the size of a deputy minister.
Therefore, Mr. Zanganeh should give account.

Of course we know that regrettably many of the appointments are
because of the connections of the individuals. They are children of
the gentlemen or nephews of the gentlemen. Therefore, we have some
points and criticisms in this area. We say one cannot talk about
meritocracy and then appoint those who do not have the merit.

Talking about appointments. I would like to say that regrettably
some officials are affected with this sinister view that everyone
finds opportunity once and that one must make the maximum use of it.
That is why they are trying to act in the direction of the interests
of themselves and not the revolution. That is why we see that some
after securing windfall power secure windfall wealth quickly and as
soon as they find a position of responsibility they try to fill the
bank accounts of themselves and those close to them. This is a
danger, which is threatening the revolution, and a remedy should be
considered for it. (Sobh # 81 was distributed in Tehran on April 22)

------------------------------

End of DNI-NEWS Digest - 25 Apr 1998 to 26 Apr 1998
***************************************************