Date: Feb 3, 1998 [ 10: 58: 2]

Subject: DNI-NEWS Digest - 2 Feb 1998 to 3 Feb 1998 - Special issue

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Subject: DNI-NEWS Digest - 2 Feb 1998 to 3 Feb 1998 - Special issue
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There are 10 messages totalling 1233 lines in this issue.

Topics in this special issue:

1. Jews in CLinton Cabinet
2. Iran Daily 98/1/27
3. Khatami needs suitable forum to express ideas
4. TEHRAN TIMES' view of Civil Society
5. Court rejects Amir-Entezam's appeal
6. UK paper's view of bombing Iraq
7. Death penalty: Guilty but Redeemed
8. Civil Society Conference Raises Contradictory Issues
9. Press should convey message of people to authorities
10. Iran denies Khatami message to Clinton

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Tue, 3 Feb 1998 14:31:51 +1100
From: Mehdi Ardalan <mardalan@LAUREL.OCS.MQ.EDU.AU>
Subject: Jews in CLinton Cabinet

THE JEWS IN CLINTON´S CABINET

Who Run Clinton and the USA

The following is a list (which doesn't include lower staff levels) of

Jews in the
present Clinton adminstration.


Madeleine Albright Secretary of State
Robert Rubin Secretary of Treasury
William Cohen Secretary of Defense
Dan Glickman Secretary of Agriculture
George Tenet CIA Chief
Samuel Berger Head National Security Council
Evelyn Lieberman Deputy Chief of Staff
Stuart Eizenstat Under Secretary of State
Charlene Barshefsky U.S. Trade Representative
Susan Thomases Aide to First Lady
Joel Klein Assistant Attorney General
Gene Sperling National Economic Council
Ira Magaziner National Health Care
Peter Tarnoff Deputy Secretary of State
Alice Rivlin Ecomomic Advisory
Janet Yellen Chairwoman, National Economic Council
Rahm Emanuel Policy Advisor
Doug Sosnik Counsel to President
Jim Steinberg Deputy to National Security Chief
Jay Footlik Special Liason to the Jewish Community
(no other group has a special liason)
Robert Nash Personal Chief
Jane Sherburne President's Lawyer
Mark Penn Asia Expert to NEC
Sandy Kristoff Health Care Chief
Robert Boorstin Communications Aide
Keith Boykin Communications Aide
Jeff Eller Special Assistant to Clinton
Tom Epstein Health Care Adviser
Judith Feder National Security Council
Richard Feinberg Assistant Secretary Veterans
Hershel Gober Food and Drug Administration
Steve Kessler White House Counsel
Ron Klein Assistant Secretary Education
Madeleine Kunin Communications Aide
David Kusnet Dept. AIDS Program
Margaret Hamburg Dir. Press Conferences
Many Grunwald Liason to Jewish Leaders
Karen Adler Dir. State Dept. Policy
Samuel Lewis National Security Council
Stanley Ross National Security Council
Dan Schifter Director Peace Corps.
Eli Segal Deputy Chief of Staff



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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 10:01:10 +0100
From: Asghar Abdi <asghar@BTINTERNET.COM>
Subject: Iran Daily 98/1/27

> THIS MESSAGE IS IN MIME FORMAT. Since your mail reader does not understand
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Jomhouri-e Eslami in its 'For your information' column made a
reference to the assertions made by former president Hashemi
Rafsanjani on the occasion of 'Qods Day' and the subsequent
reactions by the Zionist regime towards Rafsanjani's speech. "Radio
Israel called Hashemi Rafsanjani's realistic analysis (during Tehran's
Friday prayers) regarding the Palestinian's struggle against Zionism
as a distortion of history," it said. "Hashemi Rafsanjani supported
Roger Garaudy who denied the Zionists' claim that during World War
II, six million Jews were murdered by the Nazis and said that really
there had only been 200,000 Jews killed during the war," the paper
wrote.

Kar-o-Kargar in a column entitled 'In the world of politics'
wrote that the peace process in Ireland is once again being
threatened by another blast and murder in Northern Ireland.
"A Catholic taxi driver, after being abducted in Belfast, was murdered
by a group of gunmen. He was the second Catholic who was appar-ently
killed by the so-called Protestant terrorists there," the daily said.
"These tragic events are taking place amid the call for cease-fire
Friday by the 'Ulster Defense Union' following a short-period of vio-lent
activities being launched against Catholics," the paper noted. The
daily went on saying that for the same reason there is a possibility that
another terrorist group named the 'Volunteer forces supporting British
monarchy in Northern Ireland' will intervene in the continuing violent
situation there.

place during ceremonies to commemorate the death of Mehdi
Bazargan in Tabriz and wrote that a group of young volunteer
forces (Basijees) introducing themselves as the Hizbollah beat up
those in attendance and prevented members of the Freedom
Movement of Iran (FMI) from delivering speeches. "At the begin-ning,
two FMI members delivered speeches on Bazargan's personali-ty,
his opposition to British Colonialism as well as his objection to the
presence of British citizens in the Iranian National Oil Company.
However, when a university professor, Farasatkhah, was due to
speak, several members of this disruptive group stopped him from
proceeding," the daily said.

'Bamdaad-e Khomaar' (The
Morning Hangover), a love
story by Fattaneh Haj Seyyed
Javadi, was quite an event in Iran's quiet
and eventless book market.
What made the number of Iranian
bookworms, which usually stands at 3-
5,000, grow so rapidly into tens of thou-sands?
Fattaneh Haj Seyyed Javadi sincerely
answers the questions raised by those
who have read the book, those who have
missed the opportunity of enjoying a
beautiful work, and those who are keen
to know about it. She is not influenced
by any intellectual trend and persistently
defends the popular tone of her book.
The author of the book "Bamdaad-e
Khomaar" was born in Shiraz in 1945
into a reputable family. She is married to
a dentist and has two daughters who are
also both dentists.
The novel's plot
In the early years of Reza Shah's rule,
Mahboubeh, the favorite child of an aris-tocratic
Tehrani family, falls ardently in
love with a young man who works in a
carpenter's shop.
This girl, only 15, rejects all her rich,
young suitors from her own social strata.
Despite the strong opposition of her fam-ily,
she finally marries her beloved
young carpenter in a very quiet and dull
ceremony. Her father gives her a small
house and a shop, and tells her never to
visit them again as long as she is married
to the man.
The inappropriate marriage soon shows
its ugly face to the young woman, who
soon comes to face intolerable hardships;
her husband totally lacks good behavior,
is too demanding and even a womanizer.
Her mother-in-law too is a great source
of suffering, and in fact the last straw for
Mahboubeh.
Mahboubeh's first child, a son, is
drowned in the small pool in their yard
because of her mother-in-law's negli-gence.
Later, when she realizes she is
pregnant with her second child, she
attempts an illegal abortion and conse-quently
loses her fertility for ever.
Fed up of her husband's regular batter-ing
to get the house transferred into his
name, Mahboubeh at last abandons her
husband and returns to her father. She
manges to get her divorce and marries
her cousin, Mansoor, who has nursed
feelings of love for her throughout all
those tough years, though he is a married
man now.
She spends the rest of her life with
Mansoor and after his death with her
nephew, Manouchehr.
The story is narrated by Mahboubeh to
Sudabeh, Manouchehr's daughter, who is
thinking of marrying a young man from
outside her social class!
Excerpts from Javadi's interview with
"Zanan" magazine are presented below.
*** *** ***
ZANAN: What made you begin writing?
FATTANEH HAJ SEYYED JAVADI:
Like others who are endowed with a tal-ent
with words, I was interested in writ-ing
ever since I was a child.
I wrote several books but tore them
away when they were finished. The pre-sent
one too, would not have been pub-lished
if it were not for the insistence of
friends.
What encouraged you?
I think a person who has the intuitive
ability to write is like one who has got a
good voice to sing. Such a person natu-rally
loves to sing and sometimes may
even hum. Well, you write for yourself,
and sometimes you like your work too,
and if others share that feeling, well it
may even be published.
How do you evaluate your work as a
reader and not an author?
This is as if you would ask me to regard
my own child as a stranger! If you guess
I might change one word in the book
when I reconsider it, you are definitely
wrong!
How was it received by the readers?
Flying colors! It was extraordinary. I
never expected such a great reception.
Our people are so sincere, kind and
knowledgeable. Many don't like it, of
course. But I never met one who would
say it took him more than three days to
read the book.
Some said parts of the book resembled
their own lives, and this was the largest
group of my readers. Some even said it
resembled the lives of their daughters or
even sons.
People who had experienced undesir-able
marriages usually recommend the
book to those planning to marry.
The book speaks from the viewpoint of
an anxious mother. What do young
people think about this characteristic?
What attracted them to the book any
how?
They say it is very realistic. I wanted to
tell the young people that their elders
understand the subtle beauties of love as
deeply as they do.
The love you present in this book is
subtle, rather feminine and believable.
Was it inspired by personal experi-ence?
No! Not the way you imagine. I didn't
get married merely for love's sake. I have
been watching others though, and I have
seen marriages inspired by great passion
that have turned sour and were com-pletely
destroyed. I have also seen love
stories that often ended at the point when
the lovers got married. Then there was
the question: If Romeo and Juliet had
married, what would have happened to
their love? These legendary loves are so
grand that nobody can even touch them,
but at least in everyday life one could
explore realities.
Did you ever think of the readership
you were addressing while writing the
book?
I don't consider myself as a profession-al
writer. The power to write is an intu-ition,
a gift. An author doesn't writes his
or her books to earn admiration, yet that
could be one of the biggest rewards.
What do you think attracted such an
immense number of readers to the
book? Is it due to the message at the
end of book?
I have tried to write the book according
to our traditions, customs and beliefs. I
am like a musician who prefers to play
an old and original national anthem to
her own native audience rather than
playing foreign, alien tunes.
A memorial service in the Northwestern city of Tabriz on
Sunday marking the death anniversary of the first prime min-ister
of the revolutionary interim government ended in a scuf-fle.
Problems arose when a university student tried to stop one of the
attendants from delivering a speech in honor of Mehdi Bazargan at
the event held in a local mosque, a source reported. The mourners
who tried to leave the mosque found that they were locked inside and
instead were forced to stay and listen to the views of their opponents,
he said. There were clashes between the mourners and those protest-ing
against the ceremony behind closed doors for nearly one hour,
said another eye-witness, who added that the protesters also quarreled
amongst themselves as some only voiced their opposition with others
alleging that the event was illegal. Police, which had been stationed
outside the mosque, did not intervene, the source concluded.
Atop Iraqi diplomat was not warmly received during his week-long
visit to Tehran, wrote a US-based publication. According
to the daily New York Times, President Mohammad
Khatami's initial reluctance to receive Mohammad Saeid al-Sahhaf
until the sixth day of his visit showed that Iran was still skeptical in
resuming ties with Baghdad. Although the Iranian media has been
covering developments with regard to Iraq's row with the UN inspec-tion
team, the daily said, they have acted objectively in the situation
in order to avoid criticism from other countries. It quoted Iran's for-mer
UN envoy Saeid Rajaei-Khorasani as saying that the Iraqi for-eign
minister gained more than he deserved from his visit to Tehran.
If I were consulted by the president, he said, I would have suggested
that he not receive al-Sahhaf. Iraq sent its top diplomat to show that
Tehran is more inclined to Baghdad than to Washington, the daily
suggested. It concluded by noting that while Iranian Foreign Minister
Kamal Kharrazi has said that Iran intends on helping Iraq in its
attempts to have the UN-imposed sanctions against the country lifted,
President Khatami does not seem interested in assisting the Iraqi
rulers who invaded his country 18 years ago.
Students at the Islamic Center of the Imam Khomeini
International University said that the university lacked a sound
politico-cultural atmosphere. In a communique released last
week, the center criticized the impractical and disappointing measures
being taken to block both cultural and political activities and
events. The international university located to the northwest of
Tehran is comprised of about 4,000 students of which 500 have come
from foreign countries. On recent management changes, the communique
added that the major problem with the university has been its
unclear status in the system of higher education. It warned that the
lack of sufficient services could also give rise to problems in the
uni-versity.
The former coach of Iran's national football team said he has
filed a complaint against his Iranian employers, the BBC radio
reported Sunday. Interviewed by the radio, the Brazilian Valdir
Vierra said that he had written a letter to the International Football
Federation (FIFA) demanding to be indemnified by the Iranian
National Football Federation. FIFA has conveyed its concern to the
national federation over the way Vierra and the former federation
head have been substituted, the BBC said. I have a contract signed on
December 21 last year which legally terminates in October of this
year, Vierra said, adding that the federation's new chief has violated
the terms of the contract by employing a second coach for the national
squad. I do not think they have new ideas about the team's line-up,
he told the radio, they only keep telling me that my contract has been
signed by the former head of the federation. Rejecting remarks that he
has been fired for shortcomings in his plans for the team, Vierra said
he was never asked to draft any plan and that the claim intensified the
nature of his complaint. The new football chief has established a
monarchy and does not listen to others, Vierra said in response to a
question on why he has not raised the problem directly with the head
of the national federation.

--MS_Mac_OE_2968740071_401189_MIME_Part
Content-type: text/html; charset="ISO-8859-1"
Content-transfer-encoding: quoted-printable

<HTML>
<HEAD>
<TITLE>Iran Daily 98/1/27</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY BGCOLOR=3D"#FFFFFF">
<FONT SIZE=3D"4"><B><BR>
Jomhouri-e Eslami </B>in its 'For your information' column made a<BR>
reference to the assertions made by former president Hashemi<BR>
Rafsanjani on the occasion of 'Qods Day' and the subsequent<BR>
reactions by the Zionist regime towards Rafsanjani's speech. "Radio<BR=
>
Israel called Hashemi Rafsanjani's realistic analysis (during Tehran's<BR>
Friday prayers) regarding the Palestinian's struggle against Zionism<BR>
as a distortion of history," it said. "Hashemi Rafsanjani support=
ed<BR>
Roger Garaudy who denied the Zionists' claim that during World War<BR>
II, six million Jews were murdered by the Nazis and said that really<BR>
there had only been 200,000 Jews killed during the war," the paper<BR>
wrote.<BR>
<BR>
<B>Kar-o-Kargar</B> in a column entitled 'In the world of politics'<BR>
wrote that the peace process in Ireland is once again being<BR>
threatened by another blast and murder in Northern Ireland.<BR>
"A Catholic taxi driver, after being abducted in Belfast, was murdered=
<BR>
by a group of gunmen. He was the second Catholic who was appar-ently<BR>
killed by the so-called Protestant terrorists there," the daily said.<=
BR>
"These tragic events are taking place amid the call for cease-fire<BR>
Friday by the 'Ulster Defense Union' following a short-period of vio-lent<B=
R>
activities being launched against Catholics," the paper noted. The<BR>
daily went on saying that for the same reason there is a possibility that<B=
R>
another terrorist group named the 'Volunteer forces supporting British<BR>
monarchy in Northern Ireland' will intervene in the continuing violent<BR>
situation there.<BR>
<BR>
place during ceremonies to commemorate the death of Mehdi<BR>
Bazargan in Tabriz and wrote that a group of young volunteer<BR>
forces (Basijees) introducing themselves as the Hizbollah beat up<BR>
those in attendance and prevented members of the Freedom<BR>
Movement of Iran (FMI) from delivering speeches. "At the begin-ning,<B=
R>
two FMI members delivered speeches on Bazargan's personali-ty,<BR>
his opposition to British Colonialism as well as his objection to the<BR>
presence of British citizens in the Iranian National Oil Company.<BR>
However, when a university professor, Farasatkhah, was due to<BR>
speak, several members of this disruptive group stopped him from<BR>
proceeding," the daily said.<BR>
<BR>
<B><I>'Bamdaad-e Khomaar' </I></B>(The<BR>
Morning Hangover), a love<BR>
story by Fattaneh Haj Seyyed<BR>
Javadi, was quite an event in Iran's quiet<BR>
and eventless book market.<BR>
What made the number of Iranian<BR>
bookworms, which usually stands at 3-<BR>
5,000, grow so rapidly into tens of thou-sands?<BR>
Fattaneh Haj Seyyed Javadi sincerely<BR>
answers the questions raised by those<BR>
who have read the book, those who have<BR>
missed the opportunity of enjoying a<BR>
beautiful work, and those who are keen<BR>
to know about it. She is not influenced<BR>
by any intellectual trend and persistently<BR>
defends the popular tone of her book.<BR>
The author of the book <I>"Bamdaad-e<BR>
Khomaar" </I>was born in Shiraz in 1945<BR>
into a reputable family. She is married to<BR>
a dentist and has two daughters who are<BR>
also both dentists.<BR>
<B>The novel's plot<BR>
</B>In the early years of Reza Shah's rule,<BR>
Mahboubeh, the favorite child of an aris-tocratic<BR>
Tehrani family, falls ardently in<BR>
love with a young man who works in a<BR>
carpenter's shop.<BR>
This girl, only 15, rejects all her rich,<BR>
young suitors from her own social strata.<BR>
Despite the strong opposition of her fam-ily,<BR>
she finally marries her beloved<BR>
young carpenter in a very quiet and dull<BR>
ceremony. Her father gives her a small<BR>
house and a shop, and tells her never to<BR>
visit them again as long as she is married<BR>
to the man.<BR>
The inappropriate marriage soon shows<BR>
its ugly face to the young woman, who<BR>
soon comes to face intolerable hardships;<BR>
her husband totally lacks good behavior,<BR>
is too demanding and even a womanizer.<BR>
Her mother-in-law too is a great source<BR>
of suffering, and in fact the last straw for<BR>
Mahboubeh.<BR>
Mahboubeh's first child, a son, is<BR>
drowned in the small pool in their yard<BR>
because of her mother-in-law's negli-gence.<BR>
Later, when she realizes she is<BR>
pregnant with her second child, she<BR>
attempts an illegal abortion and conse-quently<BR>
loses her fertility for ever.<BR>
Fed up of her husband's regular batter-ing<BR>
to get the house transferred into his<BR>
name, Mahboubeh at last abandons her<BR>
husband and returns to her father. She<BR>
manges to get her divorce and marries<BR>
her cousin, Mansoor, who has nursed<BR>
feelings of love for her throughout all<BR>
those tough years, though he is a married<BR>
man now.<BR>
She spends the rest of her life with<BR>
Mansoor and after his death with her<BR>
nephew, Manouchehr.<BR>
The story is narrated by Mahboubeh to<BR>
Sudabeh, Manouchehr's daughter, who is<BR>
thinking of marrying a young man from<BR>
outside her social class!<BR>
Excerpts from Javadi's interview with<BR>
"Zanan" magazine are presented below.<BR>
*** *** ***<BR>
<B>ZANAN: What made you begin writing?<BR>
FATTANEH HAJ SEYYED JAVADI</B>:<BR>
Like others who are endowed with a tal-ent<BR>
with words, I was interested in writ-ing<BR>
ever since I was a child.<BR>
I wrote several books but tore them<BR>
away when they were finished. The pre-sent<BR>
one too, would not have been pub-lished<BR>
if it were not for the insistence of<BR>
friends.<BR>
<B>What encouraged you?<BR>
</B>I think a person who has the intuitive<BR>
ability to write is like one who has got a<BR>
good voice to sing. Such a person natu-rally<BR>
loves to sing and sometimes may<BR>
even hum. Well, you write for yourself,<BR>
and sometimes you like your work too,<BR>
and if others share that feeling, well it<BR>
may even be published.<BR>
<B>How do you evaluate your work as a<BR>
reader and not an author?<BR>
</B>This is as if you would ask me to regard<BR>
my own child as a stranger! If you guess<BR>
I might change one word in the book<BR>
when I reconsider it, you are definitely<BR>
wrong!<BR>
<B>How was it received by the readers?<BR>
</B>Flying colors! It was extraordinary. I<BR>
never expected such a great reception.<BR>
Our people are so sincere, kind and<BR>
knowledgeable. Many don't like it, of<BR>
course. But I never met one who would<BR>
say it took him more than three days to<BR>
read the book.<BR>
Some said parts of the book resembled<BR>
their own lives, and this was the largest<BR>
group of my readers. Some even said it<BR>
resembled the lives of their daughters or<BR>
even sons.<BR>
People who had experienced undesir-able<BR>
marriages usually recommend the<BR>
book to those planning to marry.<BR>
<B>The book speaks from the viewpoint of<BR>
an anxious mother. What do young<BR>
people think about this characteristic?<BR>
What attracted them to the book any<BR>
how?<BR>
</B>They say it is very realistic. I wanted to<BR>
tell the young people that their elders<BR>
understand the subtle beauties of love as<BR>
deeply as they do.<BR>
<B>The love you present in this book is<BR>
subtle, rather feminine and believable.<BR>
Was it inspired by personal experi-ence?<BR>
</B>No! Not the way you imagine. I didn't<BR>
get married merely for love's sake. I have<BR>
been watching others though, and I have<BR>
seen marriages inspired by great passion<BR>
that have turned sour and were com-pletely<BR>
destroyed. I have also seen love<BR>
stories that often ended at the point when<BR>
the lovers got married. Then there was<BR>
the question: If Romeo and Juliet had<BR>
married, what would have happened to<BR>
their love? These legendary loves are so<BR>
grand that nobody can even touch them,<BR>
but at least in everyday life one could<BR>
explore realities.<BR>
<B>Did you ever think of the readership<BR>
you were addressing while writing the<BR>
book?<BR>
</B>I don't consider myself as a profession-al<BR>
writer. The power to write is an intu-ition,<BR>
a gift. An author doesn't writes his<BR>
or her books to earn admiration, yet that<BR>
could be one of the biggest rewards.<BR>
<B>What do you think attracted such an<BR>
immense number of readers to the<BR>
book? Is it due to the message at the<BR>
end of book?<BR>
</B>I have tried to write the book according<BR>
to our traditions, customs and beliefs. I<BR>
am like a musician who prefers to play<BR>
an old and original national anthem to<BR>
her own native audience rather than<BR>
playing foreign, alien tunes.<BR>
A memorial service in the Northwestern city of Tabriz on<BR>
Sunday marking the death anniversary of the first prime min-ister<BR>
of the revolutionary interim government ended in a scuf-fle.<BR>
Problems arose when a university student tried to stop one of the<BR>
attendants from delivering a speech in honor of Mehdi Bazargan at<BR>
the event held in a local mosque, a source reported. The mourners<BR>
who tried to leave the mosque found that they were locked inside and<BR>
instead were forced to stay and listen to the views of their opponents,<BR>
he said. There were clashes between the mourners and those protest-ing<BR>
against the ceremony behind closed doors for nearly one hour,<BR>
said another eye-witness, who added that the protesters also quarreled<BR>
amongst themselves as some only voiced their opposition with others<BR>
alleging that the event was illegal. Police, which had been stationed<BR>
outside the mosque, did not intervene, the source concluded.<BR>
Atop Iraqi diplomat was not warmly received during his week-long<BR>
visit to Tehran, wrote a US-based publication. According<BR>
to the daily New York Times, President Mohammad<BR>
Khatami's initial reluctance to receive Mohammad Saeid al-Sahhaf<BR>
until the sixth day of his visit showed that Iran was still skeptical in<BR=
>
resuming ties with Baghdad. Although the Iranian media has been<BR>
covering developments with regard to Iraq's row with the UN inspec-tion<BR>
team, the daily said, they have acted objectively in the situation<BR>
in order to avoid criticism from other countries. It quoted Iran's for-mer<=
BR>
UN envoy Saeid Rajaei-Khorasani as saying that the Iraqi for-eign<BR>
minister gained more than he deserved from his visit to Tehran.<BR>
If I were consulted by the president, he said, I would have suggested<BR>
that he not receive al-Sahhaf. Iraq sent its top diplomat to show that<BR>
Tehran is more inclined to Baghdad than to Washington, the daily<BR>
suggested. It concluded by noting that while Iranian Foreign Minister<BR>
Kamal Kharrazi has said that Iran intends on helping Iraq in its<BR>
attempts to have the UN-imposed sanctions against the country lifted,<BR>
President Khatami does not seem interested in assisting the Iraqi<BR>
rulers who invaded his country 18 years ago.<BR>
Students at the Islamic Center of the Imam Khomeini<BR>
International University said that the university lacked a sound<BR>
politico-cultural atmosphere. In a communique released last<BR>
week, the center criticized the impractical and disappointing measures<BR>
being taken to block both cultural and political activities and<BR>
events. The international university located to the northwest of<BR>
Tehran is comprised of about 4,000 students of which 500 have come<BR>
from foreign countries. On recent management changes, the communique<BR>
added that the major problem with the university has been its<BR>
unclear status in the system of higher education. It warned that the<BR>
lack of sufficient services could also give rise to problems in the uni-ver=
sity.<BR>
The former coach of Iran's national football team said he has<BR>
filed a complaint against his Iranian employers, the BBC radio<BR>
reported Sunday. Interviewed by the radio, the Brazilian Valdir<BR>
Vierra said that he had written a letter to the International Football<BR>
Federation (FIFA) demanding to be indemnified by the Iranian<BR>
National Football Federation. FIFA has conveyed its concern to the<BR>
national federation over the way Vierra and the former federation<BR>
head have been substituted, the BBC said. I have a contract signed on<BR>
December 21 last year which legally terminates in October of this<BR>
year, Vierra said, adding that the federation's new chief has violated<BR>
the terms of the contract by employing a second coach for the national<BR>
squad. I do not think they have new ideas about the team's line-up,<BR>
he told the radio, they only keep telling me that my contract has been<BR>
signed by the former head of the federation. Rejecting remarks that he<BR>
has been fired for shortcomings in his plans for the team, Vierra said<BR>
he was never asked to draft any plan and that the claim intensified the<BR>
nature of his complaint. The new football chief has established a<BR>
monarchy and does not listen to others, Vierra said in response to a<BR>
question on why he has not raised the problem directly with the head<BR>
of the national federation.<BR>
</FONT>
</BODY>
</HTML>

--MS_Mac_OE_2968740071_401189_MIME_Part--

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 19:41:04 -0600
From: Arash Alavi <aalavi0@HOTMAIL.COM>
Subject: Khatami needs suitable forum to express ideas

[This is a courtesy copy of an article posted to Usenet via Deja News]

Iran Daily
February 2, 1998

Press Watch


Azadi, a periodical, in its most recent issue assessed
Iran's political situation and wrote that by taking a
glance at Iran's status, one can find out that President
Khatami has not yet succeeded in finding people to prepare
the proper ground to enable him to achieve his goals.
"Khatami who always tries to express his opinion in an
eloquent manner needs of a suitable forum to express his
ideas," the paper said. "Khatami does not belong to any
political faction, on the contrary he belongs to all the
people and conveys their wishes, ideals and hopes," Azadi
commented.

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Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 19:51:15 -0600
From: Arash Alavi <aalavi0@HOTMAIL.COM>
Subject: TEHRAN TIMES' view of Civil Society

[This is a courtesy copy of an article posted to Usenet via Deja News]

TEHRAN TIMES OPINION FEBRUARY 2, 1998

OPINION

Civil Society Must Be Based On Sound Ground

Civil society and the rule of law are the expressions
frequently used by the Iranian media and officials.
Unfortunately, much pain is not taken to explain what
social order or civil society means.
What is important is to admit that our planet houses a
variety of civilizations and cultures which in many cases
are contradictory with each other. Because of this
contradiction one rule or one law cannot be applicable
throughout the globe. The laws of the society are framed on
the basis of cultural and social backgrounds and above all
on the basis of the belief of majority of people of one
particular country or region.
Iran is a very specific example. Here the rules are framed
on the basis of the Islamic principles and philosophy. In
many cases what is allowed by law in Britain or even in an
Asian country may not be applicable to Iran. Minister of
Culture and Islamic Guidance Ataollah Mohajerani speaking
at a conference Saturday said, the concepts of freedom,
democracy and establishment of social institutions, going
back to over 100 years in the Western societies, in no way
contradict the Islamic faith.
Referring to Seyed Mohammad Khatami's concept of civil
society Mohajerani explained that the President's concept
of civil society emanates from the Islamic teachings. There
are countries both in the East and West where civil society
is growing without moral and social restrictions. Such
unrestricted societies are ringing alarming bells for
rational and far-sighted people as they can easily foresee
the demise of healthy moral and social values. There are
countries having homosexual clubs and there are other
countries where prostitution is legally allowed. These are
some of the few examples for which the societies, where
such practices are allowed, have become sick and rotten.
Islam is a great religion. Genuine Islam touches each and
every aspect of human life and gives guidance for making
the society healthy and peaceful. What we are trying to say
is that the words such as freedom, democracy and
establishment of social institutions can not be translated
into practice on the basis of one single principle. In Iran
efforts are being made to cultivate a healthy society based
on the Islamic principles. No one can claim that Islam has
been implemented here completely. Sincere efforts, however,
are being made to achieve the holy goals of Islam. While
one talks about dialogue between different civilizations,
it clearly means that healthy principles for a healthy
society should be exchanged to make the world prosperous
and developed on sound moral and social values.

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------------------------------

Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 19:51:10 -0600
From: Arash Alavi <aalavi0@HOTMAIL.COM>
Subject: Court rejects Amir-Entezam's appeal

[This is a courtesy copy of an article posted to Usenet via Deja News]

Iran Daily
February 2, 1998

What's Up


Tehran has rejected a petition to appeal a revolutionary
court ruling over Abbas Amir-Entezam found guilty on spying
charges against the Islamic Republic, his lawyer said
Friday. Interviewed by the VOA, Abdol-Karim Lahiji said
that his group the self-styled Society to Defend Human
Rights in Iran would keep on appealing against the judgment
passed on the former deputy prime minister of Iran's first
post-revolutionary government. Lahiji who received on
January 22 a human rights award on behalf of his advo-cate
said the prize was for Amir-Entezam's activities in
confinement and for four other activists. The biannual
prize is awarded by the Vienna-based Bruno Kreisky
Foundation named after the Austrian Chancellor for his
fight against the Nazi forces during the World War II,
Lahiji told the radio. According to the lawyer, the group
had ini-tially nominated Amir-Entezam for the former award,
which was given to South African President Nelson Mandela
for his resistance against apartheid regime. The lawyer
claimed that he has been in touch with Amir-Entezam in the
last seven years through correspon-dence. I believe that
branding a political activist a 'spy' is the most
disgusting type of indictment, he said, rejecting charges
against his defendant.

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Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 19:51:19 -0600
From: Arash Alavi <aalavi0@HOTMAIL.COM>
Subject: UK paper's view of bombing Iraq

[This is a courtesy copy of an article posted to Usenet via Deja News]

The Guardian
February 2, 1998


Being serious about Saddam

Threats need thought too

Leading article

Monday February 2, 1998

Yes, Saddam is an Evil Dictator, Mr Blair, but we knew that
already. It does not get us any closer to deciding whether
it is sensible to bomb Iraq. A calmer voice over the
weekend came from the Secretary-General of the UN. It is in
the UN's name that military action would be taken, so what
does he have to say?

Kofi Annan is calling for more time to resolve the crisis,
and with diplomacy not force. He has also repeated his
hopes that any US action on Iraq will only be undertaken
with the Security Council "on board." Mr Annan has to tread
softly, but his concerns are clear: the issue of UN
authority must come first. There is, as he said, total
unity in the Security Council on the aims of disarming Iraq
and ensuring that weapons inspections can be carried out.
Indeed, this unity is the strongest argument put forward by
the Americans and British for contemplating military
action. Yet it does not extend to the action itself. This
is more than simply an awkward detail: the British are
seeking a new resolution which, while not authorising
action, would provide a more convincing rationale. Can the
UN Charter be sidestepped in this way?

The practical arguments against a strike remain forceful.
Sir Peter de la Billiere, who commanded the British forces
during the Gulf war, says he shares the reservations "about
using the rather blunt weapon of a single strike military
force. This has never worked in history." So too does John
Nichol, the RAF navigator shot down in the same war. Fears
about biological seepage if a weapons facility were hit are
real. Those who suffered would not be the Evil Dictator but
the innocent people over whom he rules. And yes, we know
too that Saddam Hussein has used chemical weapons before.
In fact, Western governments turned a blind eye when he did
so against the Kurds.

The question is whether the situation is so critical now as
to risk all the negative consequences - to the UN's
authority, to the Middle East peace process, and to the
people of Iraq - by launching a military action now. The
slightly more positive noises coming from the region
yesterday have to be assessed critically. Countries such as
Saudi Arabia and Jordan (though not, it seems, Egypt) are
finessing their doubts: a delicate balance must be struck
between maintaining regional autonomy and keeping on good
terms with the world's only superpower.

We have been given a range of scenarios from the suggestion
that Saddam is poised to launch an anthrax strike upon Tel
Aviv to the more measured suggestion that he will, unless
checked, acquire one day the capability to do some such
thing. The most alarmist forecasts have come from Richard
Butler, the chief UN weapons inspector, who has upset
Security Council members before by speaking out of turn. Mr
Butler issued a lame clarification on Friday of his earlier
claim to the New York Times that Iraq had enough biological
material to "blow away Tel Aviv." Mr Butler should keep
quiet, and his position must surely be expendable in any
settlement to be reached with Iraq.

We need a much clearer picture than given so far on the
nature and timescale of the Iraqi threat, and a calmer
debate on the alternative options. Mr Annan's proposal for
improvements to the oil-for-food deal with Iraq, though
purporting to be unrelated, suggests a larger area for
negotiation. To threaten military force has limitations
anyhow in dealing with an Evil Dictator who has thrived
upon war at the expense of his people before. The danger is
that the threat will acquire an unstoppable momentum of its
own.


Copyright Guardian Media Group plc 1998


The Guardian
Monday February 2, 1998


Labour left hits at 'gunboat tactics'

Blair line on Iraq under fire

By Ian Black, Diplomatic Editor


Britain's firm support for attacks against Iraq if Saddam
Hussein does not back down over United Nations weapons
inspections came under fire from Labour backbenchers
yesterday amid signs that criticism may mount if push comes
to shove.

After Tony Blair called the Iraqi leader an "evil
dictator," and cranked up rhetoric in line with the United
States, Tony Benn led left-wingers in questioning whether "
gunboat diplomacy" was the right answer to this escalating
Middle East crisis.

"These matters are dealt with best by negotiation," argued
the Labour MP for Chesterfield.

"Britain has just taken over the Presidency of the European
Union. We have had a lot of speeches about how Britain is
going to speak for the Union. Europe doesn't support this.
Why should a British Prime Minister go to Washington and do
everything he's told by Clinton?"

Mr Benn joins fellow doubters today in a meeting with the
Foreign Secretary, Robin Cook, who on Saturday assured the
US Secretary of state, Madeleine Albright, of solid British
backing.

Mr Blair, seeing President Clinton in Washington this week,
and anxious to underline what is still special about the
transatlantic relationship, said: "It is vital . . . to
stop this evil dictator hanging on to his remaining weapons
of mass destruction or acquiring more."

Saddam Hussein is said to be capable of producing 350
litres per week of deadly anthrax, enough for two missile
warheads or four bombs.

But yesterday George Robertson, the Defence Secretary, made
clear that Britain remained reluctant to go for military
action - not least because it is far from certain that this
would force the Iraqi leader to comply with the UN attempts
to stop him developing nuclear, chemical and biological
weapons. " We must keep him guessing - all he needs to know
is that there is absolute resolution that if he is not
willing to comply with the UN Security Council resolutions,
then force is an option, and an option that will in
extremes be used," Mr Robertson told BBC Radio 4.

"If the United Nations is flouted, if the will of the world
community is flouted, if Saddam continued to have these
dreadful weapons of mass destruction, which he has used in
the past and he might use in the future, then what future
for the Middle East, for the Gulf region?"

But the Linlithgow Labour MP, Tam Dalyell, a campaigner
against sanctions on Iraq, said he saw little point in
another air campaign. "I just don't believe that air
strikes without ground troops are other than
counter-productive."

John Nichol, an RAF navigator who was shot down and held
captive by the Iraqis during the 1991 Gulf war, also
claimed air attacks would be a mistake.

"We bombed Saddam Hussein and his country almost back to
the Middle Ages and nothing happened," he said. "All we are
going to do is kill some civilians."

Mr Benn said on Sky TV: " The British military role is not
really significant, it's just a political cover for
President Clinton. It would cost many, many lives."

British forces in the Gulf comprise the aircraft carrier,
HMS Invincible, and other warships including HMS Nottingham
and HMS Coventry, with a total of 1,800 military personnel.
A squadron of RAF Sea Harriers from the Invincible last
week joined US warplanes over Iraq help enforce the
Southern Watch ban on air traffic in the region. The US has
30 ships, 300 warplanes and more than 28,000 troops.


Copyright Guardian Media Group plc 1998

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------------------------------

Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 19:51:27 -0600
From: Arash Alavi <aalavi0@HOTMAIL.COM>
Subject: Death penalty: Guilty but Redeemed

[This is a courtesy copy of an article posted to Usenet via Deja News]

The Independent
February 3, 1998


The sister of mercy who sees hope in murderer's execution


Sister Helen Prejean has little hope that Karla Faye
Tucker, the Texas death row inmate scheduled for execution
today, will be spared. But, as she tells our correspondent,
she hopes that her death will do some good by forcing
Americans to think more deeply about the death penalty. By
David Usborne

Sitting at her desk in her tiny New Orleans home, Sister
Helen Prejean fingers a photograph that she fully expects
to bring her deep sadness, and not a little anger, in the
hours ahead. The picture is of her with the face of an
attractive young woman resting on her shoulder smiling at
the camera.

The other woman is Karla Faye Tucker, the murder convict
who at 6pm, local time, is almost certain to be dispatched
to her death by the state of Texas as punishment for a
heinous double murder that she and a former boyfriend
committed in Houston in 1983.

Tucker, 38, has never tried to deny the crime, which was
committed with a hammer and a pickaxe. She has, however,
been asking for clemency, a request that was yesterday
unanimously rejected by the Texas Board of Pardons and
Paroles - leaving her just one last chance, the appeal that
she has before the United States Supreme Court.

The two women met at Gatesville prison, which houses
Texas's death row inmates, two months ago. Last week, while
on a speaking visit to Alaska, Sister Helen sent what she
knew would be her last words to her in a postcard, with
husky dogs pulling a sled on the front.

Sister Helen's message to Tucker was brief. "I just thanked
her, thanked her for her life and thanked her for who she
was."

These were more than words of spiritual comfort; the
gratitude was genuine. Sister Helen, who in 14 years has
become the US's best-know voice against capital punishment,
believes that the case of Karla Faye Tucker, more than any
other since the US Supreme Court reinstituted the death
chamber in 1976, will force people to think more seriously
about state-sponsored killing.

Sister Helen has done more than anyone to get that process
of reflection started. She is the nun who wrote the book
Dead Man Walking, which three years ago was made into a hit
film of the same name starring Susan Sarandon, as Sister
Helen, and Sean Penn as a convict who is sent to the death
chamber.

"What makes the death penalty possible is the
non-identification of people; the abstraction, the removing
of them. We don't see their faces. We dehumanise them like
in any military operation".

But with Tucker, we know her story, because she has told it
to countless interviewers, on CNN's Larry King and on the
60 Minutes programme. It is the story of a woman who admits
to what she did but who has found God and now gives
Christian counselling to others.

It has been a redemption that has convinced not just Sister
Helen but even the conservative tele-evangelist, Pat
Robertson, a supporter of the death penalty.

"Karla has been in front of the whole nation," the Sister
explains, "and you're looking into the face of someone who
is beautiful, reflective, obviously loving and so she poses
the moral question for us in a way that we have never had
before. Yes, she's guilty, but will we only define her,
will we freeze-frame her, in this worst act of her life."

Therein lies a truth about the death penalty that the
sister hopes Americans will begin to ponder.

"What they are saying is we don't care what you say, we're
freeze-framing you in this act of murder. And then we
freeze-frame ourselves as a society. And that's really an
act of despair," Sister Helen said.

"Karla Faye exemplifies this important thing: human beings
are more than the worst thing we do in our lives. She
exemplifies that in such a dramatic way. It's the
transcendence in a person."

That Tucker would be sent to die by the Governor of Texas -
and presidential aspirant - George Bush has never been in
doubt in the sister's mind. Because to spare her would be
to expose that absurdity at the heart of the death penalty
process: that redemption simply does not matter.

"If they acknowledge 'guilty but redeemed' as a new
category, well then, the whole thing would come apart,
because the whole thing is predicated on this: that that
act of your life is what we are going to punish you for,
never mind what else has happened in your life".

But Sister Helen, who will meet the British Prime
Minister's wife, Cherie Blair, at a US Supreme Court
ceremony in Washington this weekend, has confidence at
least that Tucker is facing death at ease with herself.

"She has a great freedom in her soul and if they kill her,
she is going to be the freest one in that room. She trusts
that God has forgiven her and will be waiting for. She will
die a free woman, I have no doubt about that," she said.

Tucker, indeed, has told Sister Helen that she is not
afraid to die. She is frightened about losing her dignity,
though, because she has a bladder control problem that may
defeat her towards the end this evening. "I guess she is
not scared to die, but she doesn't want to wet her pants in
the process," the sister said.

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------------------------------

Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 19:36:34 -0600
From: Arash Alavi <aalavi0@HOTMAIL.COM>
Subject: Civil Society Conference Raises Contradictory Issues

[This is a courtesy copy of an article posted to Usenet via Deja News]

IRAN NEWS
FEBRUARY 2, 1998

Press Review

FARDA * Referring to the Conference on Civil Society in the
Islamic Revolution of Iran which convened Saturday at the
Institute for Political and International Studies (IPIS),
Farda said issues raised at the conference were
contradictory.

Based on the same report, Minister of Culture and Islamic
Guidance Dr. Ataollah Mohajerani, addressing the
conference, said the first civil society in Islam dates
back to the establishment of the Madinat un-Nabi during the
life time of the holy Prophet (S). But Sadeq Larijani, an
instructor at the Association of Qom Seminary Teachers
(AQST), said a civil society linked with liberalism cannot
be compatible with religion.

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Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 19:36:47 -0600
From: Arash Alavi <aalavi0@HOTMAIL.COM>
Subject: Press should convey message of people to authorities

[This is a courtesy copy of an article posted to Usenet via Deja News]

Iran Daily
February 2, 1998

Press Watch


Aban, a weekly publication, in an exclusive interview with
Dr. Abdulkarim Soroush quoted him as saying that President
Khatami should identify the groups supporting violence. "A
group easily launches attacks on the people participating
in meetings in Tehran, Isfahan and Tabriz, in the most
brutal manner," Soroush noted. "President Khatami should
disclose everything to people, because people consider him
as the protector of their own rights." "The duty of the
press is not necessarily to convey the message of
supervisors to those taking orders from them, but exactly
the oppo-site," Soroush commented.

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Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 19:36:24 -0600
From: Arash Alavi <aalavi0@HOTMAIL.COM>
Subject: Iran denies Khatami message to Clinton

[This is a courtesy copy of an article posted to Usenet via Deja News]

Iran Denies Reports on Policy Changes towards U.S.

Reuters 02-FEB-98

TEHRAN, Feb 2 (Reuters) - Iran on Monday denied reports
suggesting there were changes in its policy towards the
United States and said it would not hold talks with
Washington.

``As long as America's unrealistic policies towards...Iran
continue, there is no room for talks or an improvement in
relations with America,'' state-run Tehran radio quoted
Foreign Ministry spokesman Mahmoud Mohammadi as saying.

``The Foreign Ministry spokesman strongly denied a report
by the American newspaper Los Angeles Times about President
(Mohammad) Khatami sending a message to (U.S. President
Bill) Clinton through (Palestinian President Yasser)
Arafat,'' the radio said.

The Los Angeles Times reported last week that Khatami had
told Arafat he was prepared to accept whatever Arafat did
in the Middle East peace process, even though the Iranians
did not believe it would work.

Arafat communicated that message to Clinton during talks in
Washington last week, the newspaper said.

``The Americans, who have been questioned by America's
public opinion and their allies over their illogical
policies towards Iran, use every occasion to make it appear
as if there has been a change in Iran's stand on relations
with America,'' Mohammadi said.

``It is only in this context that one can comment on this
(newspaper) report and the news spread by the American
United Nations ambassador (Bill Richardson) about the
Iranian foreign minister (Kamal Kharrazi) reciprocating his
expression of respect during a session of the World
Economic Forum in Davos,'' Mohammadi said.

Richardson said on Sunday he and Kharrazi had shaken hands
at the closed session. ``You may think that's a very minor
step, but in diplomacy that says a lot,'' he told a panel
discussion in Davos, Switzerland.

Iranian President Mohammad Khatami, a relative moderate,
has sparked widespread speculation about an imminent thaw
in relations with Washington by calling for
people-to-people exchanges between the two mutually hostile
countries.

But Iranian officials and media have said there could be no
improvements in ties until Washington dropped its hostile
attitude towards Tehran.

Washington broke diplomatic ties with Iran in 1980, months
after militants seized the U.S. embassy in Tehran and took
Americans hostage. Fifty-two hostages were held for 444
days.

Washington has imposed sanctions on Tehran, which it
accuses of backing terrorism and seeking to develop nuclear
weapons. Iran denies the charges and says the United States
is bent on destroying its Islamic government. ^REUTERS@
Reut11:15 02-02-98 SLUG: BC-IRAN-USA-DENIAL

Copyright 1998 Reuters Limited.All rights reserved.

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------------------------------

End of DNI-NEWS Digest - 2 Feb 1998 to 3 Feb 1998 - Special issue
*****************************************************************