Date: Mar 9, 1998 [ 0: 0: 0]

Subject: DNI-NEWS Digest - 7 Mar 1998 to 8 Mar 1998

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Subject: DNI-NEWS Digest - 7 Mar 1998 to 8 Mar 1998
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There are 2 messages totalling 72 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Iran seeks to pull plug on Iraq's illegal smuggled oil sales: report
2. Gulf ministers meeting opens in Riyadh with focus on Iraq, Iran

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Date: Mon, 9 Mar 1998 00:47:42 +0100
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran seeks to pull plug on Iraq's illegal smuggled oil sales: report

NEW YORK, March 8 (AFP) - Iran has decided to keep smuggling
barges out of its waters and may derail much of Iraq's lucrative
illegal oil trade, Newsweek magazine reports.
Quoting "high-ranking Iranian government sources," the magazine
said that the same week UN Secretary General Kofi Annan was
negotiating an arms inspection deal with Iraqi President Saddam
Hussein, Iranian officials decided to end support for the
oil-smuggling arrangement.
Cash-strapped Iraq is barred by UN sanctions from selling oil,
other than limited amounts Baghdad may sell to buy food and
humanitarian goods.
While Iran always denied any involvement in illegal Iraqi oil
exports, Newsweek quoted diplomatic sources as saying Iran has
earned 100 million dollars a year by facilitating them.
In turn, Saddam has earned at least 10 million dollars a month
in cash and goods in the scheme which employs hundreds of middlemen
in at least three countries, in blatant violation of the UN sanctins
on Baghdad.

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Date: Mon, 9 Mar 1998 00:48:06 +0100
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Gulf ministers meeting opens in Riyadh with focus on Iraq, Iran

RIYADH, March 7 (AFP) - Foreign ministers from the six members
of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) began a two-day meeting on
Saturday focused on the Middle East peace process, the situation in
Iraq and relations with Iran.
At the opening of the session, the GCC expressed "unease" over
the frozen Middle East peace process but said it was satisfied by
the accord between the United Nations and Baghdad on Iraqi
disarmament.
"We feel unease over the freeze in the Middle East peace process
due to the policies of Israel which stubbornly insists on
establishing and expanding settlements in the occupied Arab
territories," Kuwait Foreign Minister Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmed al-Sabah
said.
"We continue to call on the sponsors of the peace process (the
United States and Russia) to carry on their role to relaunch
negotiations on all tracks," he added.
Sabah also said that "we all feel satisfaction over the accord
signed between United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan and the
Iraqi government" on weapons inspections.
The Kuwaiti official called on Baghdad to "stop threatening its
neighbors" and to "prove its peaceful intentions toward the
countries of the region."
GCC secretary general Jamil al-Hujailan said earlier that the
ministers will also discuss relations between the GCC and Iran
during their meeting.
The Saudi daily al-Sharq al-Awsat on Saturday quoted Hujailan as
saying that the Gulf nations wanted good relations with Iran and
called for Tehran to find a peaceful solution to its dispute with
Abu Dhabi over three strategic Gulf islands.
He also told the paper that the GCC, which groups Bahrain,
Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, was
opposed to any military strike against Iraq.
At the height of the crisis over UN weapons inspections, the GCC
countries urged Iraq to cooperate with UN arms inspectors and warned
that it would be responsible for any US military attack.


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End of DNI-NEWS Digest - 7 Mar 1998 to 8 Mar 1998
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