DNI-NEWS Digest - 20 May 1998 to 21 May 1998

There are 11 messages totalling 871 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Mehdi Ardalan and Dehnamaki in Nimrooz 469. 2. PEN's letter to president Khatami regarding Morteza Firouzi's case 3. Iran exiles eye Khatami with hope year after poll 4. PRESS DIGEST - Iran - May 21 5. Hamshahri: dr HaSyh bazy tym mly fvtbal ayran dr aytalya 6. Exiles Eye Khatami with Hope 7. fwd: dr aetrax bh Hkm sngsar 8. Crackdown Continues Against Montazeri 9. Guards "worried" About Political Developments in Iran 10. fwd: sngsar nng bSryt ast, rvz jhany aetrax bh Hkm sngsar 11. Kamnh~ay mntXry ra eaml Chvnysm v~ baqy~mandh~y band mhdy haSmy KTab krd

Mehdi Ardalan and Dehnamaki in Nimrooz 469.

The interview of Mehdi Ardalan, Radio 2000, Australia, with Masud Dehnamaki is published in nimrooz 469 (Friday, 1st Khordad 1377). Please read page 18 of Nimrooz International. Masud Dehnamaki is one of the leaders of Ansar-e-Hezbullah. The whole of the article is printed in one issue.

Asghar


PEN's letter to president Khatami regarding Morteza Firouzi's case

May 19, 1998

His Excellency Hojjatoleslam val-moslemin Sayed Mohammad Khatemi President of the Islamic Republic of Iran The Presidency Palestine Avenue Azerbaijan Intersection Fax: 011-98-21-674-790

Your Excellency,

PEN American Center is writing to express our concern about the death sentence handed down to Morteza Firouzi, the founder and editor of the English-language daily Iran News. Mr. Firouzi has been in detention since approximately June of last year.

According to our information, Firouzi was charged with espionage and adultery in January 1998 and sentenced to death at that time. In March, Firouzi's sentence was repealed following your Excellency's intervention and assurances that his case would be returned to the Supreme Court for reconsideration. On May 10, 1998, press reports stated that, following a review of the case, the death sentence against Firouzi has been upheld.

We understand that the decision of the Supreme Court is final and that only His Excellency Ayatollah Khamenei, Leader of the Islamic Republic, has the authority to overturn or reduce the sentence.

We urge you to afford Mr. Firouzi a free and fair trial that is open to the public and international media. Further, we call on you to allow him his fundamental right to legal representation of his choice.

PEN is particularly concerned that Mr. Firouzi faces imminent execution and is disquieted that his trial proceedings to date have not be open to the public. We respectfully ask for some communication to let us know that our concern is acknowledged, and we are particularly eager to hear how your government plans to handle this issue.

Thank you for your consideration. We look forward to your response.

Sincerely,

Anthony Appiah Chairman, Freedom-to-Write Committee


Iran exiles eye Khatami with hope year after poll

Iran exiles eye Khatami with hope year after poll

By Firouz Sedarat

DUBAI, May 21 (Reuters) - Many Iranian exiles follow Iran's move towards more democracy with great hope a year after moderate President Mohammad Khatami's election, but radical groups insist the Islamic republic cannot be reformed.

Iranian analysts in Europe said many in the large exiled community, the majority of whom left after the 1979 Islamic revolution or during the 1980-88 Iran-Iraq war, were increasingly siding with the reform-minded leader.

``Khatami's election has had a strong impact on Iranians abroad. It has polarised them into a large majority that backs Khatami's reforms and a few radical opposition groups which reject any possibility of reforming the state from within,'' said Ali Hajighasemi, an Iranian journalist based in Stockholm.

``For the first time since the revolution, many Iranians abroad are openly expressing sympathy with a government leader inside Iran, something which was definitely taboo before.''

Khatami's popularity abroad was reflected in his being voted ``Iranian of the year,'' ahead of Iran's national soccer team and Iranian-born CNN correspondent Christiane Amanpour in a recent Internet survey at a website popular among the exiles.

The moderate Shi'ite Moslem cleric has also won hearts among exiles by calling them Iran's ``worthy ambassadors'' abroad, in contrast to the traditional attacks on them as ``runaways'' and ``counter-revolutionaries'' by conservative Iranian leaders.

``The opposition (abroad) is split into a reformist wing which sees itself more or less as an ally of Khatami and revolutionary groups which just reject him,'' Hajighasemi said.

``I think revolutionary groups, such as Mujahideen Khalq, were the main losers when Khatami was elected because 20 million Iranians started hoping there could be change through reforms.''

Khatami, campaigning on a platform advocating more political and social liberties, won 20 million or 70 percent of all votes to defeat candidates backed by the clerical establishment on May 23 last year.

The National Council of Resistance (NCR), linked to the Iraq-based Mujahideen Khalq armed opposition group, denies Khatami's landslide election was a defeat for the rebels.

``Khatami's election is actually a boost for the struggle of the resistance and the people by sharpening the regime's internal contradictions and making it weaker than ever,'' said Mohammad Mohaddessin, foreign affairs chief of the NCR.

``A year after Khatami's election, the economic situation is worse and, as far as political liberties are concerned, nothing has changed...An important change is that conflicts between the regime's leaders are more blatant,'' Mohaddessin told Reuters.

The Mujahideen Khalq, Iran's largest opposition group, is joined in its uncompromising position against the government by several royalist, leftist or Kurdish organisations.

Iran sees the Mujahideen as its main enemy and has welcomed a U.S. government measure designating the group as ``terrorist.'' The Mujahideen rejects the accusation.

More moderate opposition groups, however, see real possibilities for reform under Khatami.

``What gives me hope is that Khatami has remained faithful to his platform and shown in the past year that he is not willing to compromise on his principles for the sake of power,'' said Babak Amir-Khosravi, a Paris-based opposition activist.

``The kind of democratic opposition that I represent seeks peaceful changes and backs Khatami's moves towards granting basic liberties and insuring the rights of women, the youth and the people in general.''

Some opposition groups have warned that Khatami's efforts at reforms could be blocked by powerful conservatives in Iran who had also stood in the way of changes advocated by former President Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani.

But Amir-Khosravi said Khatami's reforms would be much harder to stymie because of a popular mobilisation behind them.

``I think there are fundamental differences between Khatami and Rafsanjani. Rafsanjani's coming to power was the result of compromises among Iranian leaders, while Khatami came to power by people challenging the leaders,'' Amir-Khosravi said.

Iranians abroad have welcomed more moves by Khatami to ease censorship of books and films and to allow scores of new publications. But there are deep concerns over the power of hardline groups which attack gatherings of critics or liberals without any intervention by police.

In a move to strengthen bonds with the several million Iranians abroad, whose know-how and investments Iran needs, Tehran has launched a satellite television channel which covers Europe and parts of Asia and the Middle East. It plans to extend the service to the large U.S.-based Iranian community.

Iran has also cut the cost of issuing passports to Iranians abroad almost eight-fold, another apparent effort to encourage exiles to visit and re-establish ties with their homeland.

But analysts say Iran's economic woes, especially stagnation and high unemployment, hamper chances of a mass return of exiles in the immediate future, although many more Iranians abroad are taking advantage of the more open atmosphere to visit.

09:04 05-21-98

Copyright 1998 Reuters Limited. All rights reserved.


PRESS DIGEST - Iran - May 21

PRESS DIGEST - Iran - May 21 02:42 a.m. May 21, 1998 Eastern

TEHRAN, May 21 (Reuters) - These are some of the leading stories in Iranian newspapers on Thursday. Reuters has not verified these stories and does not vouch for their accuracy.

TEHRAN TIMES

- Yemen's ambassador to Tehran said his country was eager to upgrade bilateral ties in all possible fields.

- Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi said Iran intended to reconsider its ties with Argentina and would recall its charge d'affaires for consultation. The move came amid a row linked to suspicions that Iran was involved in a fatal 1994 anti-Jewish bombing in Buenos Aires.

IRAN DAILY

- Following the 7-1 defeat of Iran's national soccer team in a friendly against AS Roma on Tuesday, Croatian coach Tomislav Ivic was dismissed and replaced by Iranian Jalal Talebi.

- Head of the judiciary Ayatollah Mohammad Yazdi said Friday prayer leaders should not back any specific faction and ``only reflect the facts.''

IRAN NEWS

- Iran's foreign minister will go to New York to participate in the special session of the United Nations General Assembly on the fight against the production, sale, demand, traffic and distribution of illicit drugs, an informed source said.

HAMSHAHRI

- In its statement for the inauguration of political activity, the new moderate party Kargozaran-e Sazandegi (Servants of Construction) announced its support for President Mohammad Khatami, calling on the people to take part on Saturday in ceremonies commemorating the first anniversary of his landslide election victory.

IRAN

- With the opening of the second phase of a petrochemical plant in the northwestern city of Tabriz, the plant will export $29 million worth of products in the year started Marc 21, an official at the plant said.

SALAM

- Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said the United States' efforts to isolate Iran showed that Iran was a powerful country.

JOMHURI ESLAMI - Iranian climbers scaled Mount Everest for the first time. ((Gulf newsroom, +971 4 607 1222, fax +971 4 626982, dubai.newsroom+reuters.com))


Hamshahri: dr HaSyh bazy tym mly fvtbal ayran dr aytalya

This file was created by pfont to Gerdsooz Applet to be able to read this file in Farsi, you have to use gerdsooz for Windows or use the program at: http://www.payvand.com/gerdsooz =begin=

dr HaSyh bazy tym mly fvtbal ayran dr aytalya

naCr nvAmvz mdyr tymhay mly bed az Skst sngyn tym ayran dr mqabl rm ba CraHt aelam krd kh dr mvrd trkyb tym v Syvh bazy ayvyG SKCa tCmym grfth v hyGgvnh mSvrty ba kmk mrbyan v aynjanb anjam ndadh ast.bh hmyn dlyl tmamy bar ayn Skst mtvjh Kvd ayvyG ast v ma... zd v Kvrd ely dayy ba rxa Sahrvdy dr ardv nyz yky az dlayl nzvl kyfy v rvHy tym qbl az dydar ba tym rm envan mySvd.by aHtramy, edm reayt pySksvty v tvhyn bh ykdygr dr tym mly fvtbal dygr az msail eady v bdyhy ast v yky az Afthay mhlky bhHsab myAyd kh mcl Kvrh bh jan tym aftadh ast. dr jryan zd v Kvrd ely dayy v rxa Sahrvdy msivlyn v srprstan ntvanstnd tCmym qaTe bgyrnd, az thran nyz amr Sd kh hr bazykn dr ayn jryan mqCr bvdh ast az ardv aKraj Svd v blafaClh bh thran frstadh Svd.naCr nvAmvz mdyr tymhay mly ps az brrsy msail rxa Sahrvdy ra mqCr SnaKt v bh vy aelam nmvd kh bh thran bazgrdd, ama ba vsaTt bazyknan v Kvd dayy msilh fyClh pyda krd. Qybt v taKyr krym baqry v Kdadad ezyzy hm az An dastanhay zybastkh byStr bh afsanh Sbyh ast ta vaqeyt.fdrasyvn fvtbal drbhdr bhdnbal ayn dv bazykn bvndslygayy bvd ta dr zman meyny hmrah tym kSvrSan bh aytalya sfr knnd.dr malzy kh ntvanstnd ayn dv ra pyda knnd, dr thran nyz hyGks sraQy az Anha ndaSt, dr tbryz v mShd nyz Anha Aftaby nSdnd ta aynkh dr rvzy kh hvs krdnd bh tym mly bpyvndnd bh aytalya sfr frmvdnd v bh mly pvSan aftKar hmkary dadnd.vay bh Hal tymy kh bazyknanS qadr nbaSnd bar sngyn Shrt v blndAvazy ra ba Kvd Hml knnd. az ardvy tym mly dr aytalya Kbr myrsd kh aHmdrxa eabdzadh ba SrayTy kh fela ba An dst bh gryban ast, qadr nyst tym mly ra dr fransh yary knd.nyma nkysa hm amtHan mcbt v amydvarknndhay dr mqabl rm ndad v Hal baqy mymand prvyz brvmnd v msivlyt bzrg v dSvar nghbany az drvazh tym mly. tvmyslav ayvyG bzrg v mHbvb msivlyn fvtbal kSvr dr Shry kh tmam rahha bh An Ktm mySvd az kar brknar Sd ba vjvd aetqad bh danS vClaHyt vy Hkm dr mvrdS bhajra drAmd. dr aynkh SKC riys fdrasyvn fvtbal az Hamyan v Trfdaran srsKt ayvyG bvdh ast Sky nyst, ama angar Skst sngyn dr vrzSgah rm baec Sd ta rvsay balatr kh hmySh dr mvrd fvtbal nXr KaC)!( darnd tCmym grfth baSnd. mygvynd jlvy xrr ra az hr ja bgyry mnfet ast.jnab ayvyG ya bhtr ast bgviym Tflky ayvyG tnha 011 hzar dlar az pvl pySprdaKt Kvd ra dryaft nmvdh bvd kh dGar Gnyn Qxby Sd, qrar bvd av dr Cvrt rsandn tym ayran bh mrHlh dvm mblQ 051 hzar dlar dygr dryaft knd kh Skst mjalS ndad v bh qsmt baygany mrbyan pySyn rahnmayy Sd. baz hm dfae, baz hm xef dfaey v baz hm dfae AKr, yeny dr ayn kSvr06 mylyvny fvtbalzdh yk dfae AKr mTmin pyda nmySvd? ps baSgahhay mvjvd az kdamyk az bazyknan astfadh myknnd? bayd fkry krd.az pyrmrdhay gZSth yary bTlbyd nCrallh ebdallhy, Hsyn kazrany, mHmd pnjely v ya Hsn Hbyby.

=end=


Exiles Eye Khatami with Hope

Iran exiles eye Khatami with hope year after poll

09:03 a.m. May 21, 1998 Eastern

By Firouz Sedarat

DUBAI, May 21 (Reuters) - Many Iranian exiles follow Iran's move towards more democracy with great hope a year after moderate President Mohammad Khatami's election, but radical groups insist the Islamic republic cannot be reformed.

Iranian analysts in Europe said many in the large exiled community, the majority of whom left after the 1979 Islamic revolution or during the 1980-88 Iran-Iraq war, were increasingly siding with the reform-minded leader.

``Khatami's election has had a strong impact on Iranians abroad. It has polarised them into a large majority that backs Khatami's reforms and a few radical opposition groups which reject any possibility of reforming the state from within,'' said Ali Hajighasemi, an Iranian journalist based in Stockholm.

``For the first time since the revolution, many Iranians abroad are openly expressing sympathy with a government leader inside Iran, something which was definitely taboo before.''

Khatami's popularity abroad was reflected in his being voted ``Iranian of the year,'' ahead of Iran's national soccer team and Iranian-born CNN correspondent Christiane Amanpour in a recent Internet survey at a website popular among the exiles.

The moderate Shi'ite Moslem cleric has also won hearts among exiles by calling them Iran's ``worthy ambassadors'' abroad, in contrast to the traditional attacks on them as ``runaways'' and ``counter-revolutionaries'' by conservative Iranian leaders.

``The opposition (abroad) is split into a reformist wing which sees itself more or less as an ally of Khatami and revolutionary groups which just reject him,'' Hajighasemi said.

``I think revolutionary groups, such as Mujahideen Khalq, were the main losers when Khatami was elected because 20 million Iranians started hoping there could be change through reforms.''

Khatami, campaigning on a platform advocating more political and social liberties, won 20 million or 70 percent of all votes to defeat candidates backed by the clerical establishment on May 23 last year.

The National Council of Resistance (NCR), linked to the Iraq-based Mujahideen Khalq armed opposition group, denies Khatami's landslide election was a defeat for the rebels.

``Khatami's election is actually a boost for the struggle of the resistance and the people by sharpening the regime's internal contradictions and making it weaker than ever,'' said Mohammad Mohaddessin, foreign affairs chief of the NCR.

``A year after Khatami's election, the economic situation is worse and, as far as political liberties are concerned, nothing has changed...An important change is that conflicts between the regime's leaders are more blatant,'' Mohaddessin told Reuters.

The Mujahideen Khalq, Iran's largest opposition group, is joined in its uncompromising position against the government by several royalist, leftist or Kurdish organisations.

Iran sees the Mujahideen as its main enemy and has welcomed a U.S. government measure designating the group as ``terrorist.'' The Mujahideen rejects the accusation.

More moderate opposition groups, however, see real possibilities for reform under Khatami.

``What gives me hope is that Khatami has remained faithful to his platform and shown in the past year that he is not willing to compromise on his principles for the sake of power,'' said Babak Amir-Khosravi, a Paris-based opposition activist.

``The kind of democratic opposition that I represent seeks peaceful changes and backs Khatami's moves towards granting basic liberties and insuring the rights of women, the youth and the people in general.''

Some opposition groups have warned that Khatami's efforts at reforms could be blocked by powerful conservatives in Iran who had also stood in the way of changes advocated by former President Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani.

But Amir-Khosravi said Khatami's reforms would be much harder to stymie because of a popular mobilisation behind them.

``I think there are fundamental differences between Khatami and Rafsanjani. Rafsanjani's coming to power was the result of compromises among Iranian leaders, while Khatami came to power by people challenging the leaders,'' Amir-Khosravi said.

Iranians abroad have welcomed more moves by Khatami to ease censorship of books and films and to allow scores of new publications. But there are deep concerns over the power of hardline groups which attack gatherings of critics or liberals without any intervention by police.

In a move to strengthen bonds with the several million Iranians abroad, whose know-how and investments Iran needs, Tehran has launched a satellite television channel which covers Europe and parts of Asia and the Middle East. It plans to extend the service to the large U.S.-based Iranian community.

Iran has also cut the cost of issuing passports to Iranians abroad almost eight-fold, another apparent effort to encourage exiles to visit and re-establish ties with their homeland.

But analysts say Iran's economic woes, especially stagnation and high unemployment, hamper chances of a mass return of exiles in the immediate future, although many more Iranians abroad are taking advantage of the more open atmosphere to visit.

Copyright 1998 Reuters Limited. All rights reserved.


fwd: dr aetrax bh Hkm sngsar

This file was created by pfont to Gerdsooz Applet to be able to read this file in Farsi, you have to use gerdsooz for Windows or use the program at: http://www.payvand.com/gerdsooz =begin= dr aetrax bh Hkm sngsar

hm~vTnan Azadh!

mrdm Azadh jhan!

sazmanha v nhadhay byn~al!

br payh gzarS Kbrgzarha, rJm jmhvry aslamy, mrtxy frvzy, srdbyr sabq nSryh anglysy zban ayran nyvz ra bh aedam az Tryq sngsar mHkvm krdh ast.

kanvn nvysndgan ayran (dr tbeyd xmn mHkvm danstn qanvn vHSyanh~y sngsar ansan - Gvn kyfry pySaqrvn vsTay - az hmh Sma my~Kvahd kh bray Katmh dadn bh ayn tvHS, dr jmhvry aslamy, ba ma hmCda Svd.

Azadgan ayran v jhan!

Cday aetrax Kvd ra dr brabr Gnyn aHkam v aemal nngyn v vHSyanh~ay blnd knyd.

ajazh ndhd kh, bar dygr, qrbany dygry ra dr kfn bpvSannd, dhanS ra bbndnd, av ra dr gvdal frv knnd v Angah bh Hkm Hakm Sre, pasdaran aslam Gndan sng br av bbarnd kh Kvn az kfn spydS brvn bznd.

brKyzym. ta lQv kaml ayn qanvn xdbSry, dst az aetrax brndarym.

ma, bvyJh, az hmkaran Kvd dr rsanh~hay grvhy ayrany v Karjy my~Kvahym kh dr ayn karzar ba ma hmgam v hmCda Svnd v, ta az kar aftadn kaml maSyn Sknjh v aedam v sngsar v lQv by~bazgSt qanvn Hdvd v qCaC az pay nnSynnd.

ayn nng ra dr Astanh qrn byst v ykm br Kvd npZyrym. skvt ma bh menay Alvdh Sdn vjdan~ha v dsthay mast, Gra kh bh gfth gvth: dr ayn jngy kh dr grfth ast tnha stargan Asman by~Trf~and

kanvn nvsndgan aran (dr tbed) - 5/8/8991

=end=


Crackdown Continues Against Montazeri

Iranian dissident cleric's son-in-law arrested in crackdown

TEHRAN, May 18 (AFP) - Iranian authorities have arrested the son-in-law of the dissident senior cleric Ayatollah Hossein-Ali Montazeri as part of a crackdown in the central province of Esfahan, newspapers reported Thursday.

Hadi Hashemi was arrested for his alleged role in a wave of unrest in recent weeks in the city of Esfahan and nearby town of Najafabad, Montazeri's hometown, demanding the cleric's release from house arrest, the conservative Farda (Tomorrow) said.

Hashemi had "fanned tension and discord in Esfahan and Najafabad," the hardline Kayhan daily said. Neither paper gave the date of his arrest.

The authorities have blamed a wave of strikes in Najafabad and related activities in Esfahan in support of Montazeri on followers of Hashemi's brother, Mehdi, a former cleric and member of the Revolutionary Guard who was executed in 1986 for involvement in a "plot" against the Islamic Revolution.

"Hadi Hashemi was a main operative in the gang of Mehdi Hashemi," Farda said, adding that Hadi had been arrested once before with his late brother in 1986, but later released because of his close family links with Montazeri.

At least 15 people were reported arrested after supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei issued a stern warning last Thursday to Montazeri's followers in Esfahan, accusing them of plotting against the regime.

Montazeri, 76, has been under tight police surveillance since November when he criticized Khamenei for dominating political affairs. A former designated heir to the late Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, Montazeri also called for more powers for President Mohammad Khatami, supported by leftists and reformers in the regime.

Montazeri's son and close confidant, Ahmad, told Farda newspaper however that his brother-in-law, Hadi, had distanced himself from politics in recent years. Hadi served as the head of Montazeri's office before the cleric was sacked following a direct order from Ayatollah Khomeini in 1989.

Farda, citing intelligence officials in Najafabad, said a group of people shouted slogans against Iranian leaders during a memorial service for a relative of Montazeri at a cemetery there. "Anonymous people in an orchestrated move are threatening the people of Najafabad, and have even beat up some people," it said, without elaborating.

The paper also said there was a rumor of a new strike in Najafabad on Saturday, the first anniversary of Khatami's election.

Meanwhile, 12 conservative MPs from Esfahan province issued a statement urging the government to sack "distinguished elements of Hashemi's evil gang" from government positions.

Farda said last week that several local government officials had been relieved of their duties for allegedly sympathizing with the dissident cleric.

But another MP from Esfahan, Abdol-Rahman Tajeddin, opted to attack conservative extremists, who have waged a campaign there against Khatami's leftist and moderate supporters.

"Esfahan has always been facing the plight of extremism," he told a press conference, accusing the hardliners of "insulting" Esfahan's Friday prayer leader, Ayatollah Jalaleddin Taheri, who is an outspoken critic of the rightwing extremists.

Islamic vigilante groups, which have waged a backlash against Khatami's efforts to open up the society, have disrupted several sessions of the Friday prayer in Esfahan in recent months.


Guards "worried" About Political Developments in Iran

Revolutionary Guards "worried" about political developments in Iran

TEHRAN, May 21 (AFP) - A commander of Iran's Revolutionary Guards said Thursday the elite force was "worried" about recent political and cultural developments and vowed to defend the values of the 1979 Islamic revolution.

The chief of the guards' ground forces, Brigadier General Mohammad-Ali Jafari, said the force, know as Sepah-e-Pasdaran, "will not be intimidated and is determined to defend the Islamic and revolutionary values."

"We are ready to be sacrificed for Islam and the revolution. Sepah is set up to guard the revolution and its achievements. It is natural that we should be worried for the country's security and the present developments," he told a gathering of military officers, quoted by the official IRNA news agency.

The general warned of efforts to "misinterpret the message" of last May's presidential election, when moderate Mohammad Khatami swept to a surprise landslide victory on a platform for change and greater freedom.

But the president's efforts to open up society has run into stiff opposition from hardline conservatives, who interpret the new wave of criticism against the regime as a plot to undermine the revolution.

"The whispers of an end to the era of the revolution are all plots which can only be foiled by the alertness of an active revolutionary forces," Jafari warned. "We should not be afraid of saying what is right or waver in defending the revolution's values. The Sepah will follow the political and cultural developments with sensitivity," he said.

Earlier this month, the commander of the Revolutionary Guards General Rahim Safavi reportedly attacked the new policies in a private meeting with his staff and threatened to crackdown on internal dissent and criticism.

He has since come under attack from moderate and leftist newspapers, which argue the armed forces are barred under the constitution from interfering in politics. The guards say their special privilege as guardians of the revolution allows them to speak out.


fwd: sngsar nng bSryt ast, rvz jhany aetrax bh Hkm sngsar

This file was created by pfont to Gerdsooz Applet to be able to read this file in Farsi, you have to use gerdsooz for Windows or use the program at: http://www.payvand.com/gerdsooz =begin= sngsar nng bSryt ast, rvz jhany aetrax bh Hkm sngsar

hm~myhnan Azadh!

sazmanha, nhadha, Hzb~ha v SKCyt~hay AzadyKvah!

vjdanhay bydar jhan!

brbran Hakm br ayran, dr Astanh sal dv hzar, ba ankar v rd tmamy dstavrdhay bSrt dr erCh Azady, dmkrasy, v Hqvq bSr, dr rastay aHyay aHkam kfry pySaqrvn vsTay Kvd, aelam daSth~and kh mrtxy fyrvzy, srdbyr sabq nSryh anglysy zban ayran nyvz ra bh aedam az Trq sngsar mHkvm krdh~and.

Azadgan ayran v jhan!

kStn ansan bh hr elty, nqx Kvnyn Hqvq bSr v ansanyt ast. kStar hzaran ansan dgrandS dr bydadgahhay rJym jmhvry aslamy, az jmlh karnamh~y nngyn rJymy ast kh ayn bar my~Kvahd tvHS ra dr mvrd yk rvznamh~ngar ajra knd. bh ayn meny kh qrbany ra dr kfn bpvSannd, dhanS ra bbndnd, av ra dr gvdal frv knnd v Angah bh Hkm Hakm Sre, pasdaran aslam Gndan sng br av bbarnd kh Kvn az kfn spdyS byrvn bznd v nfsS brydh Svd.

vjdanhay bydar jhan!

sngsar nng bSrt ast. skvt dr brabr An, yeny mydan dadn bh aemal nngyn rJymy kh jnayat v trvryst~ bvdnS dr dadgah byn~almll bh acbat rsydh ast. agr amrvz ayn nng afSai v mtvqf nSvd, frda nngy dygr az aHkam kyfry pySaqrvn vsTay aHya Kvahd Sd. ayn nng ra br Kvd npZyrym, Cday aetrax Kvd ra, hmyn amrvz, rsa v rsatr knym, kh frda dyr ast.

kanvn nvsndgan ayran dr tbeyd, bh Hmayt az mrtxy frvzy karzar vsye mbarzh ra ta lQv ayn Hkm v hmGnyn ta az kar aftadn kaml maSyn Sknjh v aedam v sngsar v lQv by~bazgSt qanvn Hdvd v qCaC, aelam my~dard.

dr ayn rasta ast kh kanvn nvysndgan ayran dr tbeyd rvz sy~am mah my ra rvz jhany aetrax br elyh sngsar aelam daSth , az tmamy hm~myhnan Azadh, sazmanha, kanvnha v grvhhay mtrqy ayran v jhan, bh nam Azady v ansanyt, my~Kvahd kh dr ayn rvz ba bh rah andaKtn Aksyvn~hay aetraxy, dst dr dst hm dhym, fryad dr fryad hm afknym v rsva knym sah andySan syah~kary ra kh vjvdSan, hmGvn aHkamSan, Gyzy jz nng v nfrt nyst.

kanvn nvysndgan ayran (dr tbed)

dvazdhm mah my 8991

=end=


Kamnh~ay mntXry ra eaml Chvnysm v~ baqy~mandh~y band mhdy haSmy KTab krd

It was converted from Shahrvand http://www.shahrvand.com latest number.

=begin=

Kamnh~ay mntXry ra eaml Chvnysm v~ baqy~mandh~y band mhdy haSmy KTab krd

AnGh dr py my~Ayd eyn mtn pyam syd ely Kamnh ay rhbr mZhby jmhvry aslamy ast kh KTab bh mrdm aCfhan az tlvzyvn ayn Shr Kvandh Sdh ast:

mrdm ba ayman v fdakar v Qyvr aCfhan!

Kdavnd mteal dyn Kvd ra hmvarh bh vsylh ansanhay mvmn v Azadh tqvyt krdh v bh dst Anan, tvTih~gran v bdKvahan v dSmnan ra mnkvb v mQlvb nmvdh ast v dr zman ma mlt eXym~alSan ayran ba rhbry amam raHl kbyr Kvd bh yary Kdavnd v deay mstjab Hxrt v eCr arvaHnafdah tvanst dSmn Qdar v jbar ra dr hmh~y mraHl bh zanv drAvrd v bh ftH mbyn nail Ayd. Sma mrdm Sryf aCfhan yky az zybatrn v pr aftKar tryn AzmaySha ra bh jhanyan nSan dadh v ba tqdym Shydan ealymqam v fdakarhay drKSan, dr Cfvf avl jhad eXym mlt ayran ja grfth~ayd.

aknvn Gndy ast dstgah astkbar Amryka v evaml Chvnyst Anan ba ayn gman baTl kh mlt ayran az aslam v hdfhay amam kbyr Kvd rvy brgrdandh bh tvTih~hayy dst zdh v evaml Kvd ra dr hmh ja feal krdh ast. dr astan aCfhan bqayay mnafqyn v band tbhkar mhdy haSmy medvm bh fealyt~hay asraiyl~psnd rvy Avrdh~and v ba aQfal brKy sadh~dlan mvjb Azar v mzaHmt bray mrdm ezyz v Sryf njf~Abad kh aKlaC v fdakary Anan zbanzd hmh ast Sdh~and v bray dvstan Amrykay v Chyvnyst Kvd Kvrak tblyQaty frahm my~knnd.

Sma mrdm qhrman aCfhan bKCvC frzndan ezyz bsyjym v sayr jvanan mtehd v Agah ajazh ndhyd bqayay An band rv syah kh dl amam ezyz ra Kvn krdnd, bar dygr mjal ftnh~gry pyda knnd v my~danm kh ajazh nKvahd dad. hmGnn mrdm Shydprvr v ezyz njf~Abad ngZard kh aftKarat~tan dr dvran anqlab v salhay jng tHmyly, bh dst enaCr melvm~alHal mKdvS grdd v my~danm nKvahd gZaSt.

bray abraz brait v byzary az astkbar jhany v ayady daKly v Karjy Anan frda ajtmae nmaz jmeh ra ba Hxvr Kvd Skvhmnd knyd v ba Searhay kvbndh~y Kvd az ksany kh my~Kvahnd ba amnyt mly v hdfhay anqlaby mlt mslman ayran mearxh knnd, byzary bjvyyd v ezm anqlaby Kvd ra dr merx dyd ayady astkbar bgZaryd.

enaCr fryb~Kvrdh v ftnh~gr nyz bdannd kh aynjanb ajazh nKvahm dad Anan amnyt v AramS mlt ayran ra bray hdfhay Kainanh v Hqyr KvdSan brhm bznnd v kSvr ra az rah mstqym kh bHmdallh dr An Hrkt my~knd ba ftnh v ASvb mnHrf knnd v mlt ayran ba kmk prvrdgar v enayt vly eCr arvaHnafdah hmySh br dSmnan envd Kvd pyrvz Kvahd grdyd.

valeaqbh llmtqyn. - valslam ely aKvannaalvi~mnyn - syd ely Kamnh~ay - 42 ardbhSt 7731

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End of DNI-NEWS Digest - 20 May 1998 to 21 May 1998
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