Subject: DNI-NEWS Digest - 26 Jan 1999 to 27 Jan 1999

There are 13 messages totalling 916 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Iranian satirical magazine takes cautious stab at politics
2. Tehran office of pro-Khatami paper damaged in grenade attack
3. Iranian revolution, 20 years on...
4. Unidentified missile reported close to Iranian frontier city of Abadan
5. BP Amoco competes for onshore oil fields in Iran
6. German chancellery minister to visit Iran in early February
7. Ten days that shook Iran
8. Irish Foreign Minister to visit Tehran
9. Hezbollah is Iranian agent: Egyptian government weekly
10. Iran's non-oil exports down by seven percent
11. correction:The most recent statements of Dr Habibullah Peyman
12. More VAVAK agents arrested
13. Please sign/430 signatures

Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 12:38:12 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iranian satirical magazine takes cautious stab at politics

TEHRAN, Jan 27 (AFP) - Iran's most popular satirical magazine,
Golagha, takes a lighthearted look at politicians, but continues to
steer safely clear of the all-powerful clergy two decades after the
Islamic Revolution.
In a country where humour is both indispensable and a potential
cause of trouble, Golagha has been treading a thin line since it
appeared eight years ago.
So far, the illustrated weekly has achieved its goal of making
the public laugh and ensuring its survival at the same time.
But the magazine has appeared to have tested the limits on a
number of occasions.
In one of its bolder cartoons during legislative elections two
years ago, Golagha portrayed outgoing MPs leaving the assembly in
Mercedes limousines while newly-elected deputies in ragged clothing
arrived on bicycles.
Another cartoon took a stab at recent legislation to segregate
staff at Iranian hospitals by sex in accordance with Islamic
morals.
It showed veiled and mustachioed women carrying a female patient
on a stretcher in a hospital corridor.
A regular character in Golagha, an office tea-man, represents
the man in the street, poking fun at officials with his wise and
cynical, though good-humoured, attitude.
Sceptics dismiss the magazine as a mere "safety valve for the
regime," but the magazine invokes its popularity as a defense.
An initial 20,000 readers has now risen to a steady 100,000.
"If an issue is a day late, we can expect calls from our readers
which range from the president's office to the local grocer," said
chief editor Kyumars Saberi.
Iran's satirical publications have had a checkered history in
the past two decades and were banned in the early 1980s.
Golagha began to publish in late 1990, during a period of
political detente which followed the death of Iran's revolutionary
leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.
"We had to convince people that caricatures and satire were an
art form, not just a way of poking fun at the regime," Saberi said.
Saberi is indeed anything but a dissident journalist. He served
in the 1980s as a cultural advisor to two presidents, including
Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who is now the country's supreme leader.
He is also close to President Mohammad Khatami.
There are two subjects the magazine will not touch: sex (which
includes showing women without veils) and poking fun at the clergy.
And for good reason: a cartoonist from another satirical
magazine, Farad, was jailed for a year in 1992 for crossing the red
line. He had drawn a cleric some believed bore an uncanny
resemblance to the late Ayatollah Khomeini.
But limitations on drawing clerics translate into restrictions
on laughing at politicians, given the fact that everyone who matters
in political life here is a cleric, including the supreme leader,
the president, the head of the judiciary and intelligence ministry
and the speaker of parliament.
Golagha has fallen back on benign ministers and deputies,
notably the corpulent Vice President Hassan Habibi, who is a
favorite target.
Saberi said an easing of censorship under the moderate Khatami
had allowed the magazine to be a little bolder.
Its depictions of armed right-wing extremist groups, notorious
here for their attacks on student gatherings and bookshops, are
unprecedented.
"The red line used to be very close, now it's a little farther,"
the editor said.
While readers are still unlikely to see cartoons of Ayatollah
Khomeini, they can feast their eyes on endless cartoons and articles
on Iran's much reviled enemy the United States.
"I have opened a little space for political satire here," Saberi
said. "If someone wishes to go further, they're welcome..."

Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 12:38:28 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Tehran office of pro-Khatami paper damaged in grenade attack

TEHRAN, Jan 26 (AFP) - The office of an Iranian daily supporting
moderate President Mohammad Khatami was damaged in a grenade attack
overnight which left two people injured, newspapers reported
Tuesday.
The papers said two men riding motorbikes were seen throwing a
hand grenade into the offices of Khordad daily, run by former
interior minister Abdullah Nuri, a prominent Khatami supporter.
Khordad reported Tuesday that the bomb damaged the offices and
left two employees slightly injured.
The paper had reportedly received several threats in the past
few days but had chosen to ignore them, the official news agency
IRNA reported.
The culture ministry has condemned the attack.
Khordad was founded by Nuri after he was sacked as interior
minister by Iran's conservative-dominated parliament.
Khatami immediately appointed him a vice-president, for which no
parliamentary approval is needed.

Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 12:38:47 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iranian revolution, 20 years on...

TEHRAN, Jan 26 (AFP) - "Down with America" posters have
disappeared from Tehran hotel lobbies, but giant portraits of Iran's
late and living leaders, Ayatollahs Ruhollah Khomeini and Ali
Khamenei, are still prominently displayed two decades after the 1979
Islamic Revolution.
The mixed signals are a sign that while 20 years after the
revolution Iran has quietened down and opened up, the Moslem clergy
retain their grip on the reins of power, governing in the name of
Islam.
The regime can still mobilize tens of thousands of people for
street demonstrations in its favour, although many such rallies have
taken on a routine character.
The revolutionary zeal of the 1980s seem to have given way to
passion for other things not fully under the clergy's control, such
as football which arouses intense emotions here on a par with those
in Europe.
Iran's qualification for the last World Cup and its victory
against the United States in a politically-charged match provoked
spontaneous scenes of jubilation in the Islamic country more in tune
with a Rio carnival than anything the regime could concoct.
The stunning victory of moderate cleric Mohammad Khatami against
a conservative opponent in the May 1997 presidential election served
as a shocking reminder that the people's desires may not always be
in tune with those of the regime.
Twenty years after the revolution, Iran's mere demography is a
veritable challenge to defenders of tradition: the population is one
of the youngest in the world, nealy half born after 1979.
Urban life is rapidly expanding with a majority of people now
living in cities, while women are taking an increasingly active part
in society and government.
Social contradictions are becoming stark: as orthodox-minded
ayatollahs warn of the "dangers" of satellite television and the
internet to public morality, cybercafes are opening in Tehran and
dishes mushroom on roofs.
Western-style advertising billboards, which up until few years
ago were vandalized by Islamic fundamentalists, are now spreading
throughout cities without inviting any curous eyes.
But posters advertizing Parisian perfumes and Italian shoes or
Japanese electronic gadgetry are complemented by those for religious
and revolutionary values.
Mural paintings of Iranian leaders and martyrs of the 1980-1988
war against Iraq have mushroomed on street walls in the past few
years next to Paco Rabane, with no apparent apparent sense of
unease.
Women are still required to cover themselves in public, albeit
less completely than the past, but a dozen female MPs sit in
parliament and are fighting for greater social and political rights
for their gender.
Fatemeh Hashemi, a daughter of former president Akbar Hashemi
Rafsanjani, recently told AFP she thought Iranian women were ready
for the president's job.
"People should be given posts according to their ability and
efficiency not because of their sex, so one day certainly a women
could fill the position of president, why not?" she said.
But the Islamic Republic remains a theocratic state, led by a
supreme religious authority, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, whose powers
exceed those of the government itself.
The Shiite clergy dominate the state apparatus: the president,
parliamentary speaker, head of the judiciary and key intelligence
and interior ministers are clerics.
A somwhat scattered and often confusing power structure also
includes a variety of councils and committees headed by clerics.
The main ones are: the Council of Experts, which elects the
supreme leader, the Council of Guardians, which ensures legislation
conforms to Islamic sharia law, and the Expediency Council, a top
advisory body to the supreme leader.
And the regime can also count on a formidable private army, the
Revolutionary Guards, and the bazaar, an economic backbone of the
conservative establishment which artfully combines religious piety
with business savvy.
Twenty years on, Iran remains a country where key decisions are
taken by senior clergymen, meeting behind closed doors in the
secretive seminaries of Qom, the sanctuary of religious power in
Iran.

Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 12:38:53 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Unidentified missile reported close to Iranian frontier city of Abadan

TEHRAN, Jan 25 (AFP) - Iran is investigating the origin of a
missile found one kilometre (half a mile) outside the port city of
Abadan, close to Iraq's southern border, the official Iranian news
agency IRNA reported Monday.
Abadan governor Javad Nazemi said the missile had landed Monday
morning.
US planes fired missiles at anti-aircraft batteries in southern
Iraq on Monday, close to the port of Basra, about 50 kilometres (35
miles) north of Abadan.
During the Desert Fox operation against Iraq in December, a
missile landed in the Iranian town of Khorramshahr, close to Abadan.
Kar/js/ml

Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 12:38:59 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: BP Amoco competes for onshore oil fields in Iran

NICOSIA, Jan 25 (AFP) - The US-British BP Amoco group has
submitted a proposal for a major onshore oil field in southern Iran,
the specialist Nicosia-based oil weekly Middle East Economic Survey
(MEES) reported Monday.
BP Amoco joins six other bidders for the Ahwaz project,
described as "arguably the largest and most attractive" of all the
onshore development projects put out to tender last July by the
National Iranian Oil Company (NIOC).
The other companies who have made offers for at least one of the
three fields are Royal Dutch/Shell, ENI of Italy, Lasmo of Britain
the two French firms Elf and Total. The US Arco company has
submitted a proposal which cannot be considered unless the United
States lift sanctions against Iran.
BP Amoco's proposal covers all three oilfields, Ahwaz,
Ab-Teymour and Mansuri. MEES said the proposal package is mainly
technical, and does not amount to a commitment by BP.
The Bangestan reservoirs, of which the fields are a part, are
estimated to contain a total of 65 billion barrels, of which 10
percent are recoverable. But since they are largely unproven,
comprehensive studies will have to be carried out before full
commercial development could start.
Exploitation of the fields will require the injection of gas,
possibly in combination with water. It is not clear where the
injection gas would come from.
In all 16 companies have submitted tenders under NIOC's buy-back
programme, under which the foreign operator is paid according to
production.
BP Amoco is the world's third largest oil group, formed from a
merger at the end of 1998.
Iran hopes to award its onshore oil ventures by the end of the
current Iranian year, March 20.

Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 12:39:07 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: German chancellery minister to visit Iran in early February

BONN, Jan 25 (AFP) - German Chancellery Minister Bodo Hombach
will travel to Tehran in early February at the invitation of Iranian
authorities, German government spokesman Uwe-Karsten Heye said in a
statement Monday.
In November, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder tasked Hombach
with conducting talks with relevant officials in the case of a
German national condemned to death for having sexual relations with
a Moslem woman, the statement said.
Iran's supreme court has yet to rule on the matter.
Hombach will travel to Iran "in the first days of February," the
statement said.
According to the communique, the minister's invitation is linked
to the participation of a German theatre group, "Theatre on the
Ruhr", at a Tehran theatre festival.
Before he leaves for Tehran, Hombach will meet with Iran's
ambassador to Germany, Ahmad Azizi, in Bonn on Tuesday. The
chancellery gave no further details.
Helmut Hofer, a German businessman, was arrested in the autumn
of 1997 and sentenced to death early last year for having an affair
with a Moslem woman. He is awaiting a final verdict on his appeal
from Iran's supreme court.
Under the laws of Iran's Islamic republic, sexual relations
between non-Moslems and Moslems are not permitted.

Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 12:39:13 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Ten days that shook Iran

TEHRAN, Jan 25 (AFP) - The return from exile two decades ago of
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini hastened the demise of the
25-century-old monarchy in Iran and paved the way for the ancient
country's first Islamic rule.
Returning from a long exile in Iraq and France on board an Air
France flight on February 1, 1979, Khomeini received a hero's
welcome with hundreds of thousands of people turning out to greet
him.
Hours after arriving, he delivered an historic speech at
Tehran's Behesht-e-Zahra cemetery, where he called on the government
to resign and pave the way for a "government of the people."
His return gave a clear direction to the revolution and set the
stage for religious forces to play a central role and push aside
other factions fighting against the Shah.
Bolstered by popular support, the ayatollah began to mobilize
the masses and set off a wave of demonstrations against the shah's
last prime minister Shahpur Bakhtiar, appointed to his post just two
weeks before the monarch was forced to leave the country.
Khomeini gave Bakhtiar no choice but to "surrender to the will
of the people" and resign, and threatened him with a holy war if he
failed to do so.
To expedite the government's fall and pave the way for a change
of leadership, a Revolutionary Council and a provisional government
were formed -- the latter headed by a liberal opponent of the shah,
Mehdi Bazargan.
Bazargan ran his popular-based and supposedly more legitimate
government in parallel with Bakhtiar's administration, which still
technically remained in power.
"Bazargan refused the position but I persuaded him to accept
this heavy responsibility," recalled Ebrahim Yazdi, a former
companion of Khomeini who served as foreign minister in Bazargan's
interim government.
"In a meeting of the Revolutionary Council, Bazargan set out his
conditions for forming a government and we voted, all council
members voting for Bazargan except for Mr. Khamenei," who is now the
country's supreme leader, he told AFP.
While Bazargan settled his cabinet in the more modest government
offices, Bakhtiar continued to occupy the luxurious prime minister's
palace in central Tehran.
The Shah's seemingly formidable army, which had until then
backed Bakhtiar's government, was forced to retreat in the face of
daily popular demonstrations, and generals began to flee the country
one after another.
Faced with mounting chaos, the military brass imposed a
dawn-to-dusk curfew, which in turn provoked murderous riots across
the country.
Within hours, central Tehran was littered with barricades, and
soldiers began to desert as rioters attacked army barracks to obtain
arms and ammunition.
Others stormed public buildings, hotels, bars and discos where
they smashed thousands of bottles and wine and spirits, which were
deemed to be against the Islamic spirit of the revolution.
After two days of violent clashes in Tehran and other major
cities, both the regular army and the Shah's imperial guard known as
"The Immortals" collapsed, with many of their members fraternizing
with the demonstrators.
The army chief of staff then declared the armed forces neutral
in the battle, a move which hastened the fall of Bakhtiar's
government.
On February 11, state radio, calling itself the "Voice of the
Revolution," announced the end of the monarchy and the country's
"liberation by the armed revolutionary forces."
Hundreds of government officials and military officers were
arrested and many were summarily executed in the wake of the
revolution. Many others managed to flee the country, including
Bakhtiar himself.
"He didn't have time to finish his lunch, because when I arrived
at the palace, he had fled leaving his half-finished lunch on the
table," Yazdi said.

Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 12:39:19 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Irish Foreign Minister to visit Tehran

DUBLIN, Jan 24 (AFP) - Irish Foreign Affairs Minister David
Andrews will travel to Iran Monday for a three-day visit to discuss
strengthening trade links between the two countries, a foreign
affairs department spokesman said Sunday.
The Minister is due to arrive in Tehran Monday evening and will
leave the country on Thursday.
Officials from Ireland's agriculture and trade and enterprise
departments will also be visiting Tehran with the minister.
Ireland has been in negotiations for some time with the Iranian
authorities to re-open the beef trade between the two countries.
Iran refused to accept exports of Irish cattle because of
concerns about "mad cow disease" -- bovine spongiform ecephalopathy
(BSE).
Prices of Irish cattle have been badly depressed since the loss
of exports totalling 70,000 tonnes with the collapse of the Russian
market following the economic turmoil last year.

Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 12:39:25 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Hezbollah is Iranian agent: Egyptian government weekly

CAIRO, Jan 24 (AFP) - An Egyptian government weekly on Sunday
charged that Lebanon's anti-Israeli Hezbollah guerrilla was not a
resistance movement but an "extremist" group in the pay of Iran.
"Are Hezbollah freedom fighters or agents for a non-Arab
country?" asked Rose el-Yussef magazine in a report devoted to the
Lebanese Moslem Shiite guerrilla.
"It is strange that some people support an extremist group
asserting that this group is a resistance when in fact it is not a
resistance group or anything of the kind," Rose el-Yussef said.
"It is also strange that some people are convinced of the need
for operations launched from southern Lebanon against northern
Israel or that an extremist group is acting on behalf of millions of
Moslems and Arabs in fighting Israel.
"The extremists are only doing this as part of overt and covert
action on behalf of Iran in the region," it said.
Rose el-Yussef charged that Iran was backing Hezbollah and the
Palestinian Islamic Resistance, Hamas, in a bid "to keep an
influential position in the region and to increase its influence on
the international scene."
Hezbollah's name has been traditionally linked to Iran from
where the guerrillas receive support for its battle against Israeli
troops occupying a buffer strip in southern Lebanon.
The article coincided with efforts by Tehran and Cairo to patch
up diplomatic ties which were severed 20 years ago with the ouster
of the late shah, Mohamed Reza Pahlavi, by the Islamic Revolution.
In the past Egypt repeatedly accused Iran of supporting Moslem
fundamentalist militants but over the last year Cairo has toned down
its remarks amid efforts to improve relations with Tehran.
Over the past year the two countries have exchanged official
delegations and taken part in events hosted on one another's
territory.
Iranian Vice President Massumeh Ebtekar became the
highest-ranking Iranian to visit Egypt when she attended an
international conference on the ozone layer in Cairo in November.

Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 12:39:45 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran's non-oil exports down by seven percent

TEHRAN, Jan 24 (AFP) - Income from Iran's non-oil exports has
dropped by seven percent in the past nine months despite efforts to
revive alternative sectors to make up for falling revenues from oil
sales, officials said Sunday.
Iran's exports promotion center (IEPC) said around 2.2 billion
dollars worth of non-oil goods had been exported between March and
December 1998 against 2.4 billion dollars for the same period the
year before.
Despite the seven percent fall in value, the volume of goods
exported in the past nine months rose by 34 percent, it said, adding
that the discrepancy could be explained by the "dramatic fall" in
prices of Iranian goods on international markets.
Despite the overall decline in the value of non-oil exports in
the past nine months, such exports registered a steady growth
towards the end of the period, IEPC said.
"This shows that the downward trend of non-oil exports has
stopped. This is because of a growth in agricultural exports, the
emergence of new products and because solutions have been found for
some of the problems in this sector," it said.
Iran's non-oil exports have fallen steadily since May 1995, when
the former government of president Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani imposed
a series of regulations to stop the outflow of hard currency and
stabilize the rial.
The new government has taken steps to revive the sector, which
it hoped would bring in up to six billion dollars in hard currency
annually by the end of the century.
The IEPC has announced that it will stage a major trade fair
next month to promote the country's potential exports, in hopes of
attracting foreign consumers and easing the country's dependency on
oil sales.
Iran, which relies on crude sales for 80 percent of its hard
currency income, has seen a sharp drop in such revenues in the past
year because of plummeting oil prices.

Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 17:22:49 +0000
From: "a.abdi" <a.abdi@BTINTERNET.COM>
Subject: correction:The most recent statements of Dr Habibullah Peyman

Apology for my mistake

"a.abdi" wrote:

> The most recent statements of Dr Habibullah Peyman
>
> http://www.btinternet.com/~a.abdi/pey771029.pdf
> http://www.btinternet.com/~a.abdi/pey771106.pdf

Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 18:24:18 EST
From: KPGBT@AOL.COM
Subject: More VAVAK agents arrested

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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TEHRAN, Jan 27 (AFP) - Iran's intelligence ministry said
Wednesday it had arrested several of its agents, accusing them of
clandestinely distributing political leaflets.
"Several agents who were involved in distributing underground
letters and counterfeit documents have been arrested and handed over
to the judiciary," an unnamed intelligence official said, quoted by
the official IRNA news agency.
The official said the head of the gang "claiming to have access
to classified foreign documents has accused some government
officials of committing treason."
"He sent his communiques to various organisations," he said,
adding that the authorities had seized weapons, documents and
statements which the gang had prepared for distribution.
"Initial investigation found that the man in charge of the gang
suffers from a superiority complex," the official said, without
elaborating.
The news of the latest arrests comes just weeks after the
intelligence ministry admitted that rogue secret agents were
involved in a string of recent murders of political dissidents and
intellectuals.
Iranian authorities have been searching for a shadowy group,
calling itself the Fedayeen (Devotees) of Pure Islam, which has been
anonymously faxing letters to newspapers and intellectuals
threatening them with death.
The group had claimed responsibility for the murders of
nationalist opposition leader Daryush Foruhar and his wife as well
as those of two writers in November and December.
It also claimed an attack on a group of visiting Americans as
they were travelling in a bus in Tehran in mid-November.
But IRNA did not say if the agents arrested were linked to the
Fedayeen, or disclose the themes of their secret leaflets.
The Fedayeen, who emerged several months ago, have vowed to
undermine President Mohammad Khatami's reform programme and have
accused moderate officials of betraying the fundamental principles
of the 1979 Islamic revolution.
The authorities said early this month they had arrested 10
people for complicity in the recent murders and that many more were
under surveillance.



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Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 14:19:52 -0800 (PST)
From: Payman Arabshahi <payman@neda.com>
To: iran-news@arash.neda.com
Subject: Iran announces arrest of more of its intelligence agents
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TEHRAN, Jan 27 (AFP) - Iran's intelligence ministry said
Wednesday it had arrested several of its agents, accusing them of
clandestinely distributing political leaflets.
"Several agents who were involved in distributing underground
letters and counterfeit documents have been arrested and handed over
to the judiciary," an unnamed intelligence official said, quoted by
the official IRNA news agency.
The official said the head of the gang "claiming to have access
to classified foreign documents has accused some government
officials of committing treason."
"He sent his communiques to various organisations," he said,
adding that the authorities had seized weapons, documents and
statements which the gang had prepared for distribution.
"Initial investigation found that the man in charge of the gang
suffers from a superiority complex," the official said, without
elaborating.
The news of the latest arrests comes just weeks after the
intelligence ministry admitted that rogue secret agents were
involved in a string of recent murders of political dissidents and
intellectuals.
Iranian authorities have been searching for a shadowy group,
calling itself the Fedayeen (Devotees) of Pure Islam, which has been
anonymously faxing letters to newspapers and intellectuals
threatening them with death.
The group had claimed responsibility for the murders of
nationalist opposition leader Daryush Foruhar and his wife as well
as those of two writers in November and December.
It also claimed an attack on a group of visiting Americans as
they were travelling in a bus in Tehran in mid-November.
But IRNA did not say if the agents arrested were linked to the
Fedayeen, or disclose the themes of their secret leaflets.
The Fedayeen, who emerged several months ago, have vowed to
undermine President Mohammad Khatami's reform programme and have
accused moderate officials of betraying the fundamental principles
of the 1979 Islamic revolution.
The authorities said early this month they had arrested 10
people for complicity in the recent murders and that many more were
under surveillance.


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Date: Wed, 27 Jan 1999 18:39:57 EST
From: KPGBT@AOL.COM
Subject: Please sign/430 signatures

Update
*********************************************
253 signatures from Washington D.C. (unlisted)
21 Signatures from New York (unlisted)
48 signatures from Sweden (unlisted)
105 listed signatures from Internet (listed)
++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Total: 427 signatures
**********************************************
Please reply to kpgbt@aol.com by filling this form:
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profession (optional):
country:

Hi all,

It looks like some folks have been very busy. Despite the fact that
information ministry has retreated a bit, the highly organized violent force
which is certainly part of functioning IRI is keeping up the work. They have
been active in the month of January and here is their report card:

Attacking the rallies

In the past month, several rallies in direct or indirect connection to the
recent killings )have been disrupted and attacked. Several people have been
arrested or interrogated (refer to Dr. Peyman's letter, arrest of Montezeri
supporters in Esfehan, arrest of people at Forouhar's 40th memorial, memorial
services for Mokhtari and Pouyandeh.).

Disappearance of activists:

Unconfirmed: 3 Nation Party activists
4 other activists :Source Aria: Mahmud Mejdani, Amur Ghaffuri, Morteza Oljan
Najafabadi and
Sahra Eftekhari

Death threats

3 death threats: Alijani, Iran-Farda editor, Dr. Peyman and threats against
Ayaollah Taheri.

Continuation of Killings

4 new murders
Dr. Partovi (president Khatami's neighbor) December
Jurist Javad Emami and his wife January
Fatemeh Eslami, January

New Category: Bombing the press headquarters

Khordad headquarters was attacked by two motor-cyclists

This list is probably not complete, but it simply proves that we need to work
incessantly in any possible venue as small as it may be to counter the
process.

Please help and distribute this as wide as possible.

regards

Kourosh


********************************************************************
December 1998

To: The Honorable Mary Robinson, the United Nations High Commissioner on
Human Rights, Geneva,
Switzerland, Fax # 01141-22-9170123


We are outraged to learn of the brutal and gruesome killing of two
prominent
opposition leaders in Iran, Mr. Dariush Forouhar and Mrs. Parvaneh Eskandari-
Forouhar on Sunday, November 22, 1998. We are sending this fax/e-mail to you
to ask for your expression of condemnation and outrage against this extra-
judicial execution.
We are also very concerned about the safety and security of other
opposition
members in Iran, including Mr. Abbas Amir-Entezam who remains in jail.

For your information, Mr. and Mrs. Forouhar were found stabbed to death
in
their home in Tehran on November 22, 1998. Both of their bodies were
mutilated.
The similarity of this gruesome crime and the past assassinations of other
IRI's critics and opponents, both inside and outside Iran, is horrifying and
deserves the most urgent attention by international HR organizations. Mr. and
Mrs. Forouhar had recently called for a boycott of the elections of the
Council of Experts. Also, a few months ago, Iran's revolutionary commander,
Rahim Safavi, had vowed to
"behead" and "cut the tongues" of the opponents of the regime.

A few days later after the death of the Forouhars, the body of a missing
dissident writer, Mr. Majid Sharif, was found in Tehran. Meanwhile, another
dissident journalist, Mr. Pirouz Davani, has been missing since August 1998!

The body of another dissident writer was discovered in Tehran on Wednesday,
December 9, 1998. Mr. Mohammad Mokhtari, a prominent dissident writer, was
abducted last Thursday, and his strangulated body was thereafter identified
in
a Tehran morgue by his relatives.

Mohammad Jafar Pouyandeh, a 45-year-old translator and author, has gone
missing after he left his Tehran office on Wednesday afternoon, December 10,
1998. Mr. Mohammad Pouyandeh was found dead in the town of Shahriar on
the outskirts of Tehran on December 13, 1998.

We strongly protest and condemn the extra-judicial killings of Dariush and
Parvaneh Fourouhar, Majid Sharif, Mohammad Mokhtari, Mohammad Jafar
Pouyanbdeh and request formation of
independent investigative committee to probe these killings and the
"disappearnces" in Iran.

We the undersigned would like to ask you to send a fact finding mission to
Iran to investigate the killing of Daryoosh and Parvaneh Forouhar, Majid
Sharif and Mohammad Mokhtari, Mohammad Jafar Pouyandeh and the
"disappeaance" of Piruz Davani and. We believe that this should be
investigated in the
context of ilegal activities of the "pressure groups", the "information
ministry and the "revolutionary guards" and other governmental organizations
that
have might have links with the semi-legal, semi-governmental pressure groups.


1. Dr. Kourosh Parsa, Electrical Engineer, USA
2. Mr. Shahram Kheiltash, USA
3. Dr. Mohammad Eghtedari, Economist, USA
4. Manijeh Saba, Lecturer, USA
5. Ebrahim Soujeri, PhD Student, EEEng., Turkey
6. Kokab Bahoosh, Student, U.A.E.
7. Dr. Hosein Abghari, Professor, USA
8. Ali Khalili, Accountant, Canada
9. Dr. Esmail Nooriala, Persian poet, writer and literary critic, Colorado,
USA.
10. Farhad Abdolian, Hardware designer, Sweden
11. Dr. Mehran Sam, USA
12. Siavash Enayati, Software Engineer, USA
13. Mohamad Tavakoli-Targhi, Associate Professor of History, Illinois State
University, USA
14. Sohrab Foruzan, Informatiker , Germany
15. Arash Izadi, businessman, Canada
16. Sohayl Shambashi, Consulting Engineer, San Diego, USA
17. Dr. Mansour Farhang, Professor of Political Science/ Bennington
College,
U. S. A.
18. F. Saadat, Researcher, USA
19. Mr.. Mansour Kavianpour, Vice President of Product Development, USA
20. Mrs. Marieke Kavianpour, USA
21. Hamid S. Assadi, Student, Dominica
22. Mohsen Abdi, Structural Engineer, USA
23. Sam Ghandchi, Engineering Director, U.S.A.
24. Siobhan Gibbons, College administrator, USA
25. Dr. M. GhaemMagham, physician, USA
26. Tara Etemadi, Systems Engineer, U.S.A
27. Jerome W. Clinton, Professor Princeton University, USA
28. Navid Golshahi, Engineer, USA
29. Majid Maleki, Systems Analyst, USA
30. Roya Motamed Zaman, Multimedia producer, USA
31. Farnaz Ravandi, Software Engineer, USA
32. DR. VALENTINE M. MOGHADAM, DIRECTOR OF WOMEN'S STUDIES, ASSOCIATE
PROFESSOR OF SOCIOLOGY, USA
33. Dr. Sassan Pejhan, Electrical Engineer, USA
34. Maryam Pirnazar, Communications Consultant, San Francisco, USA
35. Mehrdad Mohebbi, Electrical Engineer, USA
36. Jalil Farid, Consulting Engineer, Sweden
37. Susan Ghaemi, Australia
38. Behdad Forghani, Engineer, USA
39. J. Naghizadeh, Ph.D., Research Physicist, U.S.A.
40. Hossein B. Zadeh, Human Rights Activist, UK
41. Dr. Masoud Karim-Nia, Chemistry Engineere, Germany
42. Hamid Beheshti, Germany
43. Alireza Azizi, Physicist, USA
44. Dr Majid Ghoddusi, Electron Microscopist, Australia
45. Michael Azar, Doctorate student, Sweden
46. Hossein Gholipour , Sr. Computer Consultant, Canada
47. Barry Ghanbari, USA
48. kamyar sarshar, PhD. Student of Computer Science, Germany
49. Jim Harris, Consultant, U S A
50. Zara Houshmand, Writer, USA
51. Dr. Shahram Tabe-Mohammadi, Research scientist, Canada
52. Dr. Siroos Afshar, Computer Engineer, USA
53. Shahrzad Khorsandi, Instructor, USA44. Michael Mares, Instructor, USA
54. Noushin Hatamian, adjunct professor, USA
55. Farid Marjayee, USA
56. Reza Sadre, provisional government's Commerce minister, USA
57. Manouchehr Shafiee, USA
58.Bahman Maghsoudlou, Film producer, USA
59. Dr. Sohrab Sadri, physician, USA
60. Jamsheed Barahman, USA
61. Goudarz Eghtedari, Engineer, USA
62. Afshin Shafei, Student, Norway
63. Manucher Ghaffari, Media Specialist, USA
64. Dr. Akbar Mahdi, Sociologist, U.S.A.
65. Elizabeth M. Stiras, Student, General Studies, Minneapolis, MN, USA
66. Mohamadreza Namvar-Yeganeh, USA
67. Dr. Kamran Behnia, physicist, France
68. Ahmad Rafat Journalist Rome (Italy)
69. Asghar Abdi, MD, PhD, Birmingham, UK
70. L.R. Bartlett, PhD, Birmingham, UK
71. Majid Hashemi, Industrial Engineer, Finland
72. Mohammad Parvin, Adjunct Professor of Mechanical Engineering,
CSULA, and Aerospace Consultant, USA
73. Simin H. Rasmussen, profession Educator, USA
74. Mahmood Karbasi, Software Architect, USA
75. Gabriele Ross, counselor, USA
76. Majid Zolfaghari, Software designer, Sweden
77. Rahim Bajoghli, USA
78. Abdollah Taheri, Engineer, USA
79. Dr. Mosafa Mostafa, Physicain, USA
80. Atosa Roshan, Instructor and Certified Ontario Teacher in French, Canada
81. Sahand Nikaain, Software Engineer, Germany
82. Parwaneh Nikaain, Doctorate student, Germany
83. Akbar Mohabbati, Engineering Director, USA
84. Dr. H Gheyaspour, Researcher , UK
85. Dr. Shodja Ziaian, Toronto
86. Morteza Anvari, Engineer USA
87. Nader Hashemi, Student, Ottawa, Canada
88. Reza Irani, Germany
89. Mehrab Sedeh , Engineer , U.S
90. Dr. Bettina Ross, researcher, Germany
91. Aryo B. Pirouzni, International Finance and Relations, USA
92. Mohammad Torabi, Ph.D, Researcher at Bell Laboratories, USA
93. SHAHRZAD ARSHADI, PHOTOGRAPHER, MONTREAL, CANADA
94. N. Urland ; Germany
95. G.Urland ; Germany
96. N.Shojaat ; Germany
97. A. Alliesfehani ; Germany
98. A.R. Ghalipur; Germany
99. Hamid Ahmadzadeh, Computer Engineer, Sweden
100. Javad Fakharzadeh, CEO, Software Consulting, USA
101. Manouchehr Hormuz, Businessman, Canada
102. N. Irandost . U.S.A
103. Houman Kiani, Doctor, USA
104. Ahad Ghadimi
105. Hamid Mostafavi, Architect, U.S.A.




****************************************************
253 signatures from Washington D.C.
21 Signatures from New York
48 signatures from Sweden





*************************************************************************

*****************
CC:


The Honorable Kofi Annan, Secretary General, The United Nations, Fax # (212)
963-4879
The Honorable Nelson Mandela, President of South Africa, Fax: (011-27-21=
)4614987
The Honorable Vaclav Havel, President of Czech Republic, Fax #
01142-02-24310851
The Honorable Maurice Danby Copithorne, Special Representative on Iran,=
The United Nations Commission on Human Rights, Switzerland, Fax #
01141-22-9170123
Mr. Hanny Megally, Director of Middle East Watch, New York, Fax # (212)
972-0905
Ms. Karen Kennerly, Pen American Center, New York, Fax # (212) 334-2181
Mr. William F. Schulz, Executive Director, Amnesty International, New York,
Fax # (212) 627-1451
Ms. Nancy Bothne, Amnesty International Midwest, Chicago, Fax # (312)
427-2589
Director, Amnesty International, Washington D.C., Fax # (202) 546-7142
Ms. Cosette Thompson, Amnesty International, San Francisco, Fax # (415)
291-8722
Mr. Joe Baker, Amnesty International, Culver City (Los Angeles), Fax #
(310) 815-0457
The Iranian mission to UN, New York


End of DNI-NEWS Digest - 26 Jan 1999 to 27 Jan 1999