Date: Feb 4, 1999 [ 18: 40: 44]

Subject: DNI-NEWS Digest - 3 Feb 1999 to 4 Feb 1999 - Special issue

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Subject: DNI-NEWS Digest - 3 Feb 1999 to 4 Feb 1999 - Special issue
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There are 23 messages totalling 1230 lines in this issue.

Topics in this special issue:

1. Saga oil is authorised to produce oil in Iran: report
2. Iran's revolution: just another page of history for its youngsters
3. Iranian students demand tougher action on stray US missile hit
4. Iran's Revolutionary Guards warn against any compromise with US
5. Iran holds first direct talks with Taliban
6. Iranian budget gets final approval from constitutional council
7. Iranian FM arrives in France for rare "working visit"
8. Iranian radio hails Kharazi France visit as "turning point"
9. Liberal magazine banned in Iran
10. Bitter battle over landmark poll overshadows Iranian anniversary
11. Iran says position on Taliban unchanged by first direct talks
12. Iranian rial recovers a little after sharp fall
13. Iran draws "red line" at negotiations with US
14. France, Iran plan new deals during FM's rare "working visit"
15. France, Iran bolster ties, announce new economic deals in offing
16. France, Iran bolster ties, see new economic deals
17. Iran suuports Russia bid to solve Iraq crisis
18. Ankara and Tehran agree to cooperate on border security
19. Palestinians uncover Iranian-Hamas plot: police
20. Iran launches epic 50-hour TV series chronicling Islamic revolution
21. Unprecedented carnival adds spice to Iran's revolution festivities
22. Open Letter of French Scholars and Academics to the Islamic President
about Human Rights Violation in Iran
23. Iranian Opponents in the Streets of Paris stopped the Islamic FM to give
his speech...

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:40:07 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Saga oil is authorised to produce oil in Iran: report

OSLO, Feb 2 (AFP) - Saga Petroleum ASA has obtained two permits
to produce oil in Iran, the newspaper Aftenposten reported here on
Tuesday.
Saga would decide during the first half of the year whether or
not to make use of the permits.
Saga had said at the beginning of January that it had asked
Iranian authorities to begin negotiations for the group to
participate in operation of oil fields at Dehl Uran and
Cheshmeh-Khosh.
The negotiations would clarifiy whether or not there was a
"basis" for Norwegian investment in Iran, the company had said at
the time, without indicating the amounts it might invest.
Saga had been in talks for months with the Iranian state group
National Iranial Oil Company to produce from Iranian reserves which
experts estimate to be equivalent to 93 billion barrels.
Norwegian authorities, informed of Saga's intentions, told the
company several times to exercise caution and reminded that group
that violations of human rights in Iran had been reported.
Iran has urgent need of foreign capital and technology to
modernise its oil installations which are threatened with decline.
Iran earns 85 percent of its foreign income from oil exports and
has been hard hit by the fall of the price of oil. Revenue from oil
this year is expected to be reduced by six billion dollars (5.2
billion euros) by the fall of the price of oil.
Iran is the second-biggest producer in the Organisation of
Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), producing 3.7 million barrels
per day, of which 2.4 million barrels are for export.
Iran has had difficulty in developing its oil industry because
of the US Amato act which, since 1996, has sought to obstruct
investment in the Iranian oil and gas industries because the United
States holds that the Islamic authorities in Tehran have supported
terrorism.
The French group Total, in partnership with Gazprom and
Petronas, was the first European company to challenge the Amato act
by agreeing in 1997 to invest two billion dollars (1.75 billion
euros) in off-shore fields at South Pars.
In the first eight months of 1998 Saga made an operating loss of
1.495 billion kroner (177 million euros, 202 million dollars)
compared with a profit of 2.359 billion kroner in the same period of
1997. Meanwhile sales fell by 25 percent to 4.936 billion kroner
owing to the fall in the price of crude oil.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:40:28 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran's revolution: just another page of history for its youngsters

TEHRAN, Feb 2 (AFP) - Despite intense propaganda by Iranian
authorities, the country's 1979 revolution is already history for
its 30 million or so youngsters.
"The revolution? We're taught about it again and again
throughout our school years, but the lessons are quite repetitive,"
says Masumeh, who was barely more than a toddler when Iran's masses
toppled the Shah.
Today, as the Islamic Republic marks its 20th anniversary,
Iranian youngsters care little about the revolutionary events that
created it.
"The revolution is ancient history. We're concerned about our
problems in the here and now, like unemployment, (social)
restrictions and corruption," says Masumeh, a woman arts graduate in
her 20s.
Endless programmes shown on state television to commemorate the
return from exile of Iran's revolutionary leader Ayatollah Ruhollah
Khomeini leave her indifferent.
"We've been seeing all this for twenty years now," she says.
Yet despite criticisms of the regime, its late founder the
Ayatollah Khomeini seems to retain some of his former aura.
"We respect him because he was a great man who led the people.
At least he wasn't in it to get rich," says Hussein, an unemployed
teenager.
"When Khomeini was alive, things were better because he was in
control of the situation," he says despite the bloodshed of the
revolution's early years when Iran was wracked by internal feuds and
an eight-year war with Iraq.
Courses in the history of the Islamic revolution, from the first
protests fomented by Khomeini in 1963, are obligatory at every stage
of Iranian schooling.
But this does not stop some youngsters from having their own
ideas about the historical events.
"The country is facing difficulties as if the shah cursed the
country before he left the country for exile," says Hussein.
Iran's post-revolutionary generation, about half the country's
60 million inhabitants, sees its political weight grow every year.
It has grown up in a Tehran whose walls have been covered with
giant posters of Islamic dignitaries or of "martyrs" of the 1980-88
Iran-Iraq war.
Girls have been obliged to wear the maghnaeh, or headscarf, from
primary school age, which covers their hair but allows them to
write, unlike the black chador that covers women from head to toe.
Every year, schoolchildren chant anti-American or anti-Israeli
slogans for various revolutionary anniversaries, and sing the
ayatollah's praises in revolutionary anthems they have had to learn
by rote.
But at school, students consider English as their most important
subject, seeing it as an opening to emigration to more prosperous
countries.
Hungry for change, the revolution's grandchildren who are
eligible to vote from the age of 15, voted overwhelmingly in 1997 in
favour of the moderate presidential candidate Mohammad Khatami.
The former culture minister is popular for his regular calls to
satisfy young people's "legitimate desires."
"Khatami is now the only person who can get young people to
identify with the revolution," says Masumeh.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:40:45 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iranian students demand tougher action on stray US missile hit

TEHRAN, Feb 2 (AFP) - A group of Iranian students gathered at
Tehran university Tuesday to demand tougher action against the
United States after a US missile fired at Iraq struck the outskirts
of an Iranian border town last week.
Dozens of students gathered in the university mosque called on
the foreign ministry "to follow up this case of American aggression
against Iranian territory," the official news agency IRNA reported.
The protesters criticised the ministry for not having given "a
firm response to this violation," which they said "proves the
aggressive nature of the United States government," IRNA said.
Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharazi demanded compensation
from the United States last week for damage to the southwestern town
of Abadan caused by the missile aimed at Iraqi air defence sites,
and vowed to raise the issue at the United Nations.
"The United States should pay compensation, not just for the
material damage, but also for the non-material, psychological damage
caused by this violation of Iranian air space," Kharazi said.
Kharazi vowed that Iran would step up its protests. "Today this
matter will be raised at the United Nations," he said.
In December, during Operation Desert Fox, another stray cruise
missile landed in Iran, in the southern city of Khorramshahr.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:40:53 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran's Revolutionary Guards warn against any compromise with US

TEHRAN, Feb 2 (AFP) - The hardline commander of Iran's
Revolutionary Guards warned against any "compromise" with the United
States on Tuesday saying that it went against the teachings of the
20-year-old Islamic revolution.
"There is great antagonism between the United States and the
revolution," General Yahya Rahim Safavi told a crowd of youngsters
gathered to mark the revolution's 20th anniversary.
"Those who want to prepare the ground for a compromise should
know that the path of struggle against the United States was set out
by (the late revolutionary leader Ayatollah Ruhollah) Khomeini and
the people will follow this path," the official news agency IRNA
quoted him as saying.
Safavi was referring to members of Iran's reformist government
who advocate a thaw in relations with the United States and have
been calling for greater concessions from Washington in return.
"Action, not words" was needed from the United States if
relations between Tehran and Washington were to improve, Foreign
Minister Kamal Kharazi said on Friday.
"We need concrete action to change the United States' policy of
hostility towards Iran, and measures proving that the US is
sincere," he said during the World Economic Forum in Davos,
Switzerland.
But Iran's conservative-dominated parliament Saturday voted a
special budget to fight "American plots."
Washington broke off diplomatic relations with Tehran in April
1980 after 52 US diplomats were taken hostage at the former US
embassy here.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:40:36 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran holds first direct talks with Taliban

TEHRAN, Feb 2 (AFP) - Iranian officials held their first direct
talks with the Taliban militia which controls most of neighbouring
Afghanistan in Dubai on Tuesday, the official Iranian news agency
IRNA reported.
Iranian officials met the Taliban militia's senior spokesman,
Mawlawi Wakil Ahmad, at an Iranian mission there in response to the
militia's call for an improvement in their troubled relations, the
news agency said.
Ahmad had requested the meeting to brief Tehran on the Taliban's
efforts to arrest the militiamen responsible for the killing of
eight Iranian diplomats and a journalist in Afghanistan last year,
it said.
Punishment of the killers has been Iran's principal demand for
improving relations.
Ahmad, spokesman for Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Omar, said
the Taliban are "still committed to hunting down and punishing the
killers," IRNA said.
Iranian officials stressed "the need for fulfilment of Iran's
righteous requests, especially the need for speedy identification,
arrest and punishment of agents behind the massacre," it said.
The Taliban foreign ministry last Wednesday called for improved
relations with Iran, which has supported opposition forces fighting
the Taliban in the Afghan civil war.
A spokesman said the Taliban were ready "to negotiate with the
Iranian authorities toward solving all problems" between the two
countries, particularly the murder of the Iranians which led Tehran
to mass troops on the Afghan border last August and September.
Iran gave a guarded welcome Sunday to the call, saying "there
are no obstacles" to a dialogue as long as the Taliban met Iran's
condition of arresting and punishing the Iranians' killers."
"We have insisted on our legitimate demand that the
identification, arrest and punishment of those responsible for the
murder of Iranian diplomats and a journalist are the precondition to
any further developments" in relations, foreign ministry spokesman
Hamid Reza Asefi told Tehran radio.
The United Arab Emirates, of which Dubai is the commercial
capital, is one of just three countries which recognize the Taliban
as Afghanistan's legitimate government.
Iran and the rest of the international community still supports
the government of ousted president Burhanuddin Rabbani.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:41:09 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iranian budget gets final approval from constitutional council

TEHRAN, Feb 2 (AFP) - The Iranian government's austerity budget
for the coming financial year received final approval from the
constitutional council Tuesday after its approval by parliament
Sunday.
The Council of Guardians, which ensures legislation conforms to
the constitution and Islamic sharia law, ratified the budget after
MPs made the required "modifications in several amendments," a
spokesman told the official news agency IRNA.
The budget, which is intended to tackle a severe recession
prompted by a sharp fall in the price of the government's main
source of revenue, oil, was approved after two weeks of often stormy
debate in parliament.
The government is facing a 6.3 billion dollar budget deficit for
the current financial year, and is set to raise taxes by over 34
percent for the coming year, though many MPs said it is unlikely to
obtain forecast tax revenues.
The budget foresees spending of 97,553 billion rials (31 billion
dollars at the official exchange rate) for the year beginning March
21 but still predicts a budget deficit of five billion dollars or
more.
It anticipates an oil price of just over 11.8 dollars a barrel,
9.2 percent down on this year, generating revenues from oil and oil
products of 12.084 billion dollars.
Iran, the second largest oil producer in the Middle East,
depends on oil sales for more than 80 percent of its hard currency
earnings.
Despite parliament's approval of the budget Iran's currency, the
rial, has continued to plunge in value against major curencies on
the illegal open market, according to money changers.
The rial is now trading at around 8,500 to the dollar against
7,500 just a week ago.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:41:43 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iranian FM arrives in France for rare "working visit"

PARIS, Feb 2 (AFP) - Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharazi
arrived Tuesday in Paris for a rare "working visit" during which he
will prepare a ground-breaking trip to France by President Mohammad
Khatami.
Kharazi, the first Iranian foreign minister to visit France in
eight years, was to meet late Tuesday with his French counterpart
Hubert Vedrine. The two men were to have a working breakfast
Wednesday before holding a midday press conference.
The Iranian minister was also to meet Wednesday with President
Jacques Chirac and Economy Minister Dominique Strauss-Kahn.
Iran said last month that Khatami's visit to France -- the first
by an Iranian head of state to a European Union country since the
1979 Islamic revolution -- was planned for after the Iranian new
year starting March 21, but that no date had been set.
Several ministerial meetings have taken place in the last months
between France and Iran, notably on economic issues.
On the economic front, French oil group Total in 1995 signed a
contract to develop two oilfields, Sirri A and E, in the Gulf, close
to Dubai's territorial waters, for a total investment of around 660
million dollars.
It is negotiating developing Sirri C and D, which would make it
the dominant player over the whole project and would optimise the
use of its facilities on Sirri Island.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:41:49 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iranian radio hails Kharazi France visit as "turning point"

TEHRAN, Feb 3 (AFP) - The Iranian official radio said Wednesday
that the current visit to France by Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal
Kharazi was a "turning point" in Franco-Iranian relations.
"This visit is a turning point and will open up a new chapter in
our long-term relations in all areas," the radio said.
The visit is the first official visit to France of an Iranian
foreign minister, at bilateral level, since July 1991.
The radio said France was "a country of great civilisation and
can therefore play a prominent and privileged role in President
Mohammad Khatami's policy of promoting dialogue between cultures and
civilisations".
Kharazi arrived on Tuesday in Paris on a "working visit" during
which he will discuss preparations for a forthcoming visit to France
of the Iranian head of state.
Kharazi was scheduled to have a first meeting Tuesday evening
with his counterpart Hubert Vedrine, followed Wednesday morning by a
working breakfast with his host.
He also has meetings lined up with President Jacques Chirac and
Finance Minister Dominique Strauss-Kahn.
After the normalisation of ties between Iran and the European
union, Vedrine visited Tehran in August and on that occasion
delivered an invitation to Khatami from Chirac to visit France.
Arrangements for the visit which is expected to take place in
the spring, are likely to be discussed at Khatami's meeting with
Chirac.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:44:16 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Liberal magazine banned in Iran

TEHRAN, Feb 3 (AFP) - Iranian judicial authorities banned a
liberal magazine accusing it of printing false material and
violating "public morals."
Gholamhossein Zakeri, chief editor of the fortnightly political
and literary review Adineh, was fined nine million rials (about
1,000 dollars) while the review's publication permit was revoked for
printing "material contrary to public morals," the official IRNA
news agency reported late Tuesday.
The controversial liberal review had recently printed a series
of articles condoning free relations between men and women,
forbidden by Islam, and deploring the absence of joy in Iranian
society.
One of these explained that "joy and pleasure have died in
Iranian society where laughter is considered a sin."
The court ruling decided to ban the review for printing
"anti-Islamic" material, though it gave no details of the charges.
Relations between the sexes have been strictly regulated in Iran
since the 1979 revolution that replaced the Shah's secular regime
with an Islamic government.
The magazine's closure follows the resignation Monday of Iran's
deputy culture minister in charge of press affairs, Ahmad Borqani,
considered a friend of a relatively free press.
Borqani, a former IRNA editor, had come under fire from
conservatives and hinted in his farewell speech that his resignation
was linked to "pressures from outside government," meaning
conservative pressure groups.
Adineh was formerly edited by the dissident writer Faraj
Sarkuhi, currently in exile in Germany and condemned to a year's
prison in 1997 for allegedly spying for a foreign power.
Sarkuhi, who denied the charges, and 134 other writers and
intellectuals, signed an appeal in 1994 calling for greater freedom
of expression in Iran.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:44:32 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Bitter battle over landmark poll overshadows Iranian anniversary

TEHRAN, Feb 3 (AFP) - Iran's sqabbling political factions
continued a bitter war of words on Wednesday over the country's
first ever municipal elections, despite repeated calls for unity on
the Islamic regime's 20th anniversary.
The landmark vote, due on February 26, is considered the Islamic
regime's first great test in local democracy, and has provoked a
violent squabble between supporters of reformist President Mohammad
Khatami and conservatives who have striven to bar radicals and
moderates from standing as candidates.
Khatami and his supporters, including moderate Interior Minister
Abdul Vahid Musavi-Lari, have urged widespread participation by all
political tendencies as well as the country's 30 million or so
youngsters in a bid to give the poll, and the regime, the popular
seal of approval.
But conservatives who dominate the various election supervision
committees, have barred a number of prominent moderates and radicals
in a bid to restrict candidates to hardline supporters of the regime
and its leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.
While moderates believe widespread participation will boost
Khatami's reformist agenda, conservatives are keen to consolidate
their local power base.
The interior ministry has slammed the move as arbitrary,
insisting the committees are overstepping their supervisory role.
The committees, manned mostly by conservative MPs, have rejected
the accusation as "unfounded," accusing the ministry of politicising
the poll.
The wrangle coincides with lavish celebrations to mark the 20th
anniversary of the Islamic revolution and official attempts to
strengthen popular support for the regime, particularly among those
born in the past 20 years.
Khatami urged young people to turn out as massively in the
coming poll as they did in presidential elections in 1997 which
ensured his shock victory over concervative opponent Ali Akbar
Nateq-Nuri and gave him uncontested popular legitimacy.
"One of the greatest things about the last presidential election
was the presence of young people and women -- I salute you," he told
cheering schoolchildren at a special youth venue on Tuesday.
Moderates are concerned the vetting of candidates will dampen
popular enthusiasm and participation, in a repetition of previous
parliamentary and other elections.
The preparation for the poll has once again brought out the
divisions within the Iranian regime, even as senior officials have
called for unity.
Former president Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani Monday called on the
rival factions to stop their "endless bickering," which was
threatening the regime like a "poison."
Iran's supreme leader Khamenei meanwhile advised youngsters to
ignore the squabbles.
"I have already told (the factions) to stop the squabbling and I
advise you not to pay any attention to them," he said in a meeting
with a group of selected youngsters, broadcast on television
Tuesday.
About 330,000 candidates, including 5,000 women, have been
approved so far to stand in elections for 200,000 council seats.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:44:44 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran says position on Taliban unchanged by first direct talks

TEHRAN, Feb 3 (AFP) - Iran's first direct talks with the Taliban
militia which controls most of neighbouring Afghanistan do not spell
a change in Tehran's policy towards its war-wracked neighbour, the
foreign ministry insisted here Wednesday.
"No, the fact that this meeting took place with the
representative of an Afghan faction does not mean that we have
changed policy," ministry spokesman Hamid Reza Asefi told state
radio.
"These direct talks between (senior Taliban spokesman) Mawlawi
Wakil Ahmad and two Iranian diplomats were held at the repeated
request of the Taliban," he said.
Iranian officials met Ahmad at an Iranian diplomatic mission in
Dubai on Tuesday following a call from the militia last week for an
improvement in their troubled relations, the official Iranian news
agency IRNA reported.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:45:01 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iranian rial recovers a little after sharp fall

TEHRAN, Feb 3 (AFP) - The Iranian rial recovered ground against
major currencies on Wednesday after a sharp fall in value in recent
days.
Iran's currency was trading at around 8,100 rials to the dollar
on Wednesday, up from a record low of 8,750 the day before.
Just a week ago the rial was still trading at 7,500 to the
dollar.
Illegal forex dealers in Tehran attributed the sharp fall to
"unjustified demand for the dollar and nervousness with the
approaching Iranian new year" on March 21.
The currency's slide has continued relentlessly for several
months -- late last year the rial crashed through the 6,000 and
7,000 thresholds against the dollar in a matter of weeks.
The sharp fall in the rial's value has been linked to the
government's hard currency crunch, prompted by plummeting prices on
world markets for Iran's main export, oil.
Iran banned the open exchange market four years ago in an effort
to prevent the collapse of the rial against major foreign
currencies.
The government maintains three official exchange rates of 1,750,
3,000 and 5,700 rials to the dollar respectively for state
transactions, licensed exporters and some travellers authorised to
receive hard currency.
After two weeks of often stormy debate, parliament approved a
package of tax increases and government spending cuts for next
year's budget Sunday, in a bid to tackle the mounting economic
crisis.


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:45:19 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran draws "red line" at negotiations with US

TEHRAN, Feb 3 (AFP) - Iran draws a "red line" at negotiations
with the United States which is just as clear cut as the bar on
relations with Israel, the foreign ministry said here Wednesday.
"This red line is clear: no relations with the Zionist regime
(Israel) and no dialogue with the United States," ministry spokesman
Hamid Reza Asefi said.
Iran "considers the Zionist regime as illegitimate and rules out
any negotiations with the United States because of their hostile
attitude," he told the official IRNA news agency.
The United States severed relations with Iran in 1980, when
revolutionary students stormed the American embassy in Tehran,
holding staff captive for over a year.
It has since tried to isolate Iran, accusing it of undermining
the Middle East peace process and of developing weapons of mass
destruction, charges Iran denies.
Iran has repeatedly called for the destruction of the Jewish
state and backs militant Palestinian opposition groups as welling as
hosting a Palestinian embassy here.
Asefi said Iran does not trust the United States and "American
officials' statements on Iran are contradictory," adding the
contradictions "add to our doubts."
The two countries have made faint overtures calling for renewed
dialogue since the election of moderate cleric Mohammad Khatami to
the Iranian presidency in 1997.
But moves by Iranian moderates such as Khatami to crack open the
"wall of mistrust" between the two states have met with fierce
opposition from conservatives.
The hardline commander of Iran's Revolutionary Guards warned
against any "compromise" with the United States on Tuesday saying
that it went against the teachings of the 20-year-old Islamic
revolution.
"There is great antagonism between the United States and the
revolution," General Yahya Rahim Safavi told a crowd of youngsters
gathered to mark the revolution's 20th anniversary.
"Those who want to prepare the ground for a compromise should
know that the path of struggle against the United States was set out
by (the late revolutionary leader Ayatollah Ruhollah) Khomeini and
the people will follow this path,"
Even moderate foreign ministry officials have called on the
Americans to show definite signs of their friendly intentions, such
as lifting the economic embargo on Iran.
"Their tone has changed a little but we also have to see a
change of attitude," Asefi said.
Iran's Foreign Minister Kamal Kharazi protested against the
United States last week and demanded compensation for damage to the
southwestern town of Abadan caused by a stray US missile fired at
Iraqi air defence sites.
"The United States should pay compensation, not just for the
material damage, but also for the non-material, psychological damage
caused by this violation of Iranian air space," Kharazi said.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:45:24 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: France, Iran plan new deals during FM's rare "working visit"

PARIS, Feb 3 (AFP) - France and Iran on Wednesday announced that
a series of new bilateral business deals could be struck ahead of a
ground-breaking visit to France by President Mohammad Khatami.
The news came after two meetings between French Foreign Minister
Hubert Vedrine and his Iranian counterpart, Kamal Kharazi, the first
Iranian foreign minister to visit France in eight years.
"Prospects for the future are totally open and positive,"
Vedrine told a news conference held after his second round of talks
with Kharazi.
Contracts between the two countries were in the pipeline and
should "materialise very rapidly", he said, refusing to add
details.
Kharazi for his part told reporters that "several contracts
should be concluded before the visit to Paris next spring of the
Iranian head of state, Mohammad Khatami."
Iran said last month that Khatami's visit to France -- the first
by an Iranian head of state to a European Union country since the
1979 Islamic revolution -- was planned for after the Iranian new
year starting March 21, but that no date had been set.
Kharazi is expected to discuss preparations for the Khatami's
rare foray abroad during talks later Wednesday with President
Jacques Chirac.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:45:30 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: France, Iran bolster ties, announce new economic deals in offing

PARIS, Feb 3 (AFP) - France and Iran, breathing new life into
bilateral ties, on Wednesday announced new business deals in the
offing while striking a series of cultural and diplomatic
agreements.
The announcements came during a meeting to France by Iranian
Foreign Minister Kamal Khatazi, Tehran's first foreign minister in
eight years to pay a "working visit" to France.
The visit "marks a new stage in the consolidation of our
relations," his French counterpart Hubert Vedrine said at a joint
news conference held after two rounds of talks between the pair.
Vedrine visited Tehran last August to resume dialogue with Iran,
broken off during a year due to friction with European Union
nations.
"Prospects for the future are totally open and positive,"
Vedrine said, adding that contracts between the two countries were
in the pipeline and should "materialise very rapidly".
He refused details on the deals but Kharazi said separately that
talks with the French oil group Elf-Aquitaine were under way and
should "be concluded swiftly."
Kharazi also told reporters that "several contracts should be
concluded before the visit to Paris next spring of the Iranian head
of state, Mohammad Khatami."
Iran said last month that Khatami's planned visits to first
Italy and then France -- the first by an Iranian head of state to EU
nations since the 1979 Islamic revolution -- were scheduled for
after the Iranian new year starting March 21, but that no date had
been set.
Kharazi is to discuss preparations for Khatami's rare foray
abroad during talks later Wednesday with President Jacques Chirac.
France, which is Iran's fifth trading partner after Germany, the
United Arab Emirates, Japan and Italy, sees "many potential areas of
(economic) cooperation", Vedrine said.
"There is a joint will to develop them," he added.
Kharazi also met Finance Minister Dominique Strauss-Kahn to
discuss ways of increasing economic cooperation with France, largely
focussed on oil imports for the moment.
French oil group Total in 1995 signed a contract to develop two
oilfields, Sirri A and E, in the Gulf, close to Dubai's territorial
waters, for a total investment of around 660 million dollars.
It is negotiating developing Sirri C and D, which would make it
the dominant player over the whole project and would optimise the
use of its facilities on Sirri Island.
Meanwhile the two countries Wednesday agreed to ease visas for
citizens from both countries while also announcing Iran's agreement
in principle to allow the opening of a French teaching centre in
Tehran in around six months.
France in exchange will allow the Iranian cultural centre in
Paris to develop its scientific activities and open a centre for
teaching Farsi.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:45:36 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: France, Iran bolster ties, see new economic deals

PARIS, Feb 3 (AFP) - France and Iran, breathing new life into
bilateral ties, on Wednesday declared that an array of business
deals was in the offing and struck a series of cultural and
diplomatic agreements.
The announcements came during a meeting to France by Iranian
Foreign Minister Kamal Kharazi, Tehran's first foreign minister in
eight years to pay a "working visit" to France.
"We find there is a very positive atmosphere between Iran and
the outside and we welcome this atmosphere," Kharazi said after an
hour of talks with President Jacques Chirac. "We are trying our best
to develop our relations with all countries."
The visit "marks a new stage in the consolidation of our
relations," his French counterpart, Hubert Vedrine, said at a joint
news conference.
Vedrine visited Tehran last August in order to resume dialogue
with Iran, broken off for a year due to friction with European Union
(EU) members.
"Prospects for the future are totally open and positive,"
Vedrine said, adding that contracts between the two countries were
in preparation and should "materialise very rapidly".
He refused to give details, but Kharazi said separately that
talks with the French oil group Elf-Aquitaine were under way and
should "be concluded swiftly."
Kharazi added that "several contracts should be concluded"
before the Iranian head of state, Mohammad Khatami, visits Paris in
the spring.
Kharazi also met Finance Minister Dominique Strauss-Kahn to
discuss ways of increasing economic cooperation.
French oil group Total signed a contract in 1995 to develop two
oilfields, Sirri A and E, in the Gulf, close to Dubai's territorial
waters, for a total investment of around 660 million dollars.
It is negotiating on developing Sirri C and D, which would make
it the dominant player over the whole project and would optimise the
use of its facilities on Sirri Island.
President Khatami is also planning to visit Italy as well as
France, in what will be the first trip by an Iranian head of state
to EU nations since the 1979 Islamic revolution.
In Rome, Italian Foreign Minister Lamberto Dini said Khatami's
visit to Italy was scheduled for March 8-11.
The visit "caps joint efforts to help Iran rejoin the
international community," Dini told parliament's foreign affairs
committee.
Khatami would attend a conference at the European University
Institute in Florence, "with a message for Europe," he added.
Meanwhile, France and Iran agreed to ease visas for citizens
from both countries while also announcing agreement in principle to
allow the opening of a French teaching centre in Tehran in around
six months.
France in exchange will allow the Iranian cultural centre in
Paris to develop its scientific activities and open a centre for
teaching Farsi.
The only hitch to Kharazi's visit to France appeared to be his
surprise cancellation late Wednesday, citing lack of time, of a
speech he was to deliver on his country's foreign policy before the
French Institute of International Relations.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:45:42 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran suuports Russia bid to solve Iraq crisis

TEHRAN, Feb 3 (AF) - Iran said Wednesday it welcomed Moscow's
efforts to find a solution to the ongoing crisis in Iraq, the
official Iranian news agency IRNA reported.
Mehdi Safari, Iran's ambassador to Moscow, told Russian Deputy
Foreign Minister Viktor Posuvalyuk that as acting head of the
Organisation of the Islamic Conference (OIC) Tehran was "eager to
cooperate with Russia," IRNA said.
Safari said Iran also favours resolving the Afghan crisis by the
establishment of a "broad-based government... comprising all
political groups," IRNA reported, adding that Posuvalyuk said Russia
would welcome Iran's efforts.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:45:52 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Ankara and Tehran agree to cooperate on border security

ANKARA, Feb 3 (AFP) - Turkey and Iran agreed Wednesday to
cooperate on border security during a visit here by Iranian Deputy
Foreign Minister Mohsen Eminzad, the Anatolia news agency reported.
A direct telephone link will be installed between the armies on
both sides of their shared border to enable "effective" cooperation
between the two countries, the agency said.
A meeting will take place next week to determine who will be
responsible for the line on each side and to make the line
operational.
Ankara has frequently criticised Iran for "closing its eyes" to
border infiltrations by rebels from the Kurdistan Workers Party
(PKK), a charge which Tehran has denied.
Eminzad met Wednesday with Turkish President Suleyman Demirel,
bringing with him a message from Iranian President Mohammad Khatami
"on the latest developments on the Iraqi crisis," said Anatolia.
The Iranian minister also met Turkish Foreign Minister Ismail
Cem.
Turkey and Iran recently normalised relations after a diplomatic
rift over comments by Iranian diplomats favouring the Islamist
movement in Turkey.
The two countries swapped ambassadors last May after having
recalled them some months earlier.
In recent months Iranian leaders have denounced the military
cooperation between Israel and Turkey, calling on Ankara to
reconsider its role.
Turkey and Israel signed a military accord in 1996, provoking
anger in the Arab world. Israel and Turkey have denied their
military cooperation agreement is targeted at any particular nation
in the Arab world.
Turkish speaker of parliament Hikmet Cetin visited Tehran last
week, becoming the first speaker of parliament to do so.
BA/pvh/po/ri/mc

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:46:03 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Palestinians uncover Iranian-Hamas plot: police

GAZA CITY, Feb 3 (AFP) - The Palestinian police said Wednesday
they had uncovered an Iranian "plot" to launch a wave of suicide
bombings in cooperation with the militant group Hamas, including one
against an Israeli school bus.
Palestinian police chief Ghazi Al-Jabali said Palestinian
security forces "confirmed the arrival of 35 million dollars from
Iranian intelligence services," adding that relevant documents had
been seized last week at a headquarters of the Ezzedin al-Kassam
brigade, the military wing of Hamas.
"The Palestinian Authority treated the matter seriously and
informed Israeli authorities in order to get an Israeli school bus
from the Kfar Drom settlement in the Gaza Strip, that the brigade
wanted to blow up, off the road," Jabali told reporters.
He said the Palestinian Authority had received "corroborating
information from US, western and Arab (intelligence) services about
an Iranian plot aimed at influencing the Israeli elections in favour
of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu." The elections are due to take
place in May.
Jabali said 130 million dollars had been "allocated for the
carrying-out of suicide bombings by the al-Kassam brigades" and that
interrogation of brigade members had yielded several arms caches in
residential areas of the Gaza Strip.
In November, Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat blamed pro-Iranian
factions for a wave of anti-Israeli attacks, including a suicide
bombing in Jerusalem that wounded 24 Israelis and left both
attackers dead.
The Palestinian Authority has made a point of drawing a sharp
distinction between Iranian moderates close to reformist President
Mohammad Khatami and hardliners led by Iranian supreme leader
Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.
"An extremist faction in Iran led by Khamenei wants to
exacerbate the situation in the Palestinian territories in order to
provoke a civil war," said Tayeb Abdelrahim, secretary general of
the Palestinian Authority.
Tehran has denied the charges.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:46:20 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran launches epic 50-hour TV series chronicling Islamic revolution

TEHRAN, Feb 4 (AFP) - The shah and his wife strode majestically
through the marble halls of the imperial Saadabad Palace again
Thursday as Iran's Islamic regime started filming an unprecedented
50-hour TV series marking the 20th anniversary of their overthrow.
Moderate President Mohammad Khatami looked on as a valet
announced the grand entry of his imperial majesty the shah, played
by actor Reza Banafsheh Khah.
Following the customs of the old imperial court, the shah
extended his hand for his top political and military aides to kiss,
before settling down for intense discussions about the emerging
Islamic opposition.
The news his advisers have to give him about the opposition's
growing strength infuriates the shah who storms out of the lavishly
furnished hall.
In another scene watched by Khatami, the shah's third wife,
empress Farah Diba, played by actress Mahshid Afshar Zahdeh, talks
animatedly with his twin sister Ashraf on an antique French settee.
Both actresses wear headgear even though they are indoors, in a
nod to the dress code for women the Islamic authorities imposed
after the revolution.
But the actresses do not wear the Islamic headscarves Iranian
women are normally obliged to wear when they appear in public.
The epic series covers the entire period from the first
stirrings of Islamic opposition to the shah in 1963, right up to the
final overthrow of the shah 20 years ago this month.
The producers have to yet to decide who is to play the part of
the late leader of the revolution, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.
"It is very difficult to find an actor who look likes him," a
member of the production team told AFP.
But the schedule for the filming means the producers will have
to choose someone soon.
The epic series is to be shown in 60 episodes of 50 minutes each
-- no date has yet been announced for the screening of the first
episode.
Director Amir Ghavidel expects the marathon project to take two
years to complete.
On Monday the Iranian authorities launched 10 days of
celebrations which run through to February 11, the 20th anniversary
of the fall of the last imperial government.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 22:46:55 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Unprecedented carnival adds spice to Iran's revolution festivities

TEHRAN, Feb 4 (AFP) - Thousands of Iranians took to the streets
of the capital Thursday for a "caravan of joy" as the Islamic regime
jazzed up celebrations for its 20th anniversary with an
unprecedented street festival.
The convoy of amateur actors, dancers and musicians drew
Iranians of all ages as it wound its way along Revolution Street,
one of the capital's main thoroughfares.
Youngsters on rollerskates donned cartoon character masks as
folk musicians from across the country and dancers in traditional
costume gave the festivities a carnival atmosphere.
Puppeteers on horse-drawn carts and troupes of actors dressed as
animals or ancient warriors entertained the crowds.
The break with the sombre political demonstrations staged by the
Islamic authorities over the past 20 years drew passers-by of all
ages.
"It's the first time I've seen anything like this on Revolution
Street," said Siavosh, a 16-year Tehrani.
"Let's hope everyone's having a really good time -- we get so
few chances to be happy with all the economic problems we're
having," said Ahmed, a grey-haired worker in his 50s full of the
excitement of the occasion.
Officially dubbed "the carnival of joy," the parade had clearly
been organized hastily and on a limited budget -- the articulated
lorries on which the performers entertained the crowds had been
borrowed from the army.
But the improvised arrangements did not stop hordes of
schoolchildren joining in the festivities.
The parade was the latest in a string of special events the
authorities have staged to help young people identify with 10 days
of festivities marking the revolution's 20th anniversary.
State officials and MPs are set to hold a series of
unprecedented public meetings with youngsters next week in a bid to
give the younger generation an opportunity to ask former
revolutionaries why they rose against the shah 20 years ago this
week.
The question and answer sessions set up for both fifth formers
and primary school children reveal growing official concern that a
full 50 percent of Iran's population aged 20 or under have no
understanding of the reasons behind the 1979 revolution.
"You youngsters were not in the revolution, so it is natural
that what you know is only what you have read or heard," Khatami
told a 12,000-strong crowd of cheering schoolchildren on Tuesday.
"But the revolution was a dramatic development in terms of the
speed and sheer scope of change ... and youngsters just like you
played the most important part," he said.
State television also begun filming a marathon 50-hour TV series
on events leading to the shah's overthrow.
Standing with the camera crew in the Saadabad palace in northern
Tehran on Thursday, President Khatami looked on as the shah, played
by actor Reza Banafsheh Khah, settles down to a tense political
meeting to discuss the emerging Islamic opposition.
In another scene watched by Khatami, the shah's third wife,
empress Farah Diba, played by actress Mahshid Afshar Zahdeh, talks
animatedly with his twin sister Ashraf on an antique French settee.
Both actresses wear headgear even though they are indoors, in a
nod to the dress code for women the Islamic authorities imposed
after the revolution.
But neither wear the Islamic headscarves Iranian women are
normally obliged to wear in public.
The producers have to yet to decide who is to play the part of
the late revolutionary leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.
"It is very difficult to find an actor who look likes him," a
member of the production team told AFP.
But the schedule for the filming means the producers will have
to choose someone soon.
The epic series is to be shown in 60 episodes of 50 minutes each
-- no date has yet been announced for the screening of the first
episode.
Director Amir Ghavidel expects the marathon project to take two
years to complete.


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 20:26:37 -0600
From: "Aryo B. Pirouznia" <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: Open Letter of French Scholars and Academics to the Islamic President
about Human Rights Violation in Iran

Lettre ouverte à Monsieur Mohammad Khatami

Cette lettre ouverte est signée par plus de 100 universitaires en France
dont Pierre Bourdieu, Pierre Ansart , Robert Castel , Jacques Ardoino ,
Michel Broué , François Gaspar et Alain Touraine.




Paris, le 15 janvier 1999


A Monsieur Mohammad Khatemi, le président de la République Islamique d'Iran
Monsieur le président,
Nous suivons avec beaucoup d'inquiétudes les événements tragiques
concernant la disparition, la torture et l'assassinat de plusieurs
intellectuels et universitaires iraniens. Après la mort suspecte de M.
Sharif, depuis le 10 décembre 1998, M. Mokhtari et M. D. Pouyandé deux
intellectuels et chercheurs iraniens, auteurs de plusieurs ouvrages sur la
tolérance et les droits de l'homme, ont été retrouvés torturés et
assassinés près de Téhéran.
Nous exprimons notre indignation face à ces actes inhumains et criminels.
Vos promesses électorales avaient suscité un grand espoir pour
l'amélioration de la situation des Droits de l'Homme en Iran.
Malheureusement depuis plusieurs mois la société iranienne est confrontée à
une nouvelle vague de répression dont les universités, la presse et les
milieux intellectuels en sont la principale cible.
Nous vous demandons :
- de prendre des mesures nécessaires et urgentes afin de mettre
immédiatement un terme à cette vague de violence et de terreur contre les
intellectuels et d'assurer leur sécurité,
- de poursuivre ceux qui ont commandité et commis ces crimes et de
les faire comparaître publiquement devant la justice,

Monsieur le président,
L'humanité fête en ce moment le cinquantième anniversaire de la Déclaration
Universelle des Droits de l'Homme. Nous souhaitons vivement que l'Iran,
rejoigne, enfin, à l'entrée du 21ème siècle, la grande famille des peuples
qui jouissent de ces droits élémentaires. C'est en ce sens que nous
attendons de vous des actes concrets.

Les professeurs, enseignants et chercheurs des établissements de
l'enseignement supérieur en France


Ansart Pierre, professeur, université Paris 7
Ardoino Jacques, professeur, université Paris 8
Assadi Djamchid, professeur, American University of Paris
Authier Jean-Yves, Maître de Conférences, l'Université Lumière Lyon 2
Baduel Pierre Robert, Directeur du URBAMA, Président de l'Association
française pour l'étude du monde arabe et musulman (AFEMAM)
Balibar Etienne, professeur, université Paris 10
Bandier Norbert, maître de Conférences, Université Lumière Lyon2
Barbier René, professeur, université Paris 8
Barumanzadeh Taghi, maître de conférences, université Pierre Mendès-france
(Grenoble II)
Bechman-Ferrand Dan, professeur, Université Paris 8
Bensaïd Daniel, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Berthier Patrick, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Beski Chahla, enseignant-chercheur, ADRI
Boucharlat Rémy, Directeur de recherche CNRS, Lyon
Boumard Patrick, professeur, Université Rennes II
Bourdieu Pierre, professeur, Collège de France
Bressat Alain, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Brossart Alain, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Broué Michel, Professeur à l'Université Paris 7 Denis-Diderot
Castel Robert, directeur d'études, EHESS
Chacon Louis, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Chacon Marie A., maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Chanson-Jabeur Chantal, Directeur Adjoint du Laboratoire SEDET, CNRS/
Université Paris 7
Chappaz Georges, maître de Conférences, Université de provence
Charlot Bernard, professeur, université Paris 8
Chérer René, professeur, université Paris 8
Cheiban Ali, maître de Conférences, Université Lumière Lyon2
Cherif Ali, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Colin Lucette, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Coulon Alain, professeur, Université Paris 8
Cours-Salies P., professeur, université Paris 8
Courtils des Jacques, Professeur à l'Université de Bordeaux III
Denoix Sylvie, CNRS, Aix-en-Provence
Debeauvais Michel, professeur émérite, Université de Paris 8
Douaiccer Stéphane, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Dufer Marie-Christine, IE-CNRS
Ennaffa Ridha, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Fabre Renaud, président de l'université Paris 8
Fashahi Mohammed Reza, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Fatemi Shaheen, professeur, American University of Paris
Fritsch Philippe, Professeur, Universite Lyon2/Lumiere
Gaspar François, maître de conférences, EHESS
Ghiglione R., vice président, université Paris 8
Gole Nilufer, enseignat-chercheur, EHESS
Gonzalez-Quijano Yves, Maître de conférences, Université Lyon II
Grandmaison Olivier, maître de conférences, sciences politiques-Evry
Grekos Georges, maitre de Conferences, Universite de Saint-Etienne.
Groossens Daniel, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Grusson Pascale, CR. CNRS
Hess Remi, professeur, université Paris 8
Hubschman Jacques, Professeur, Université de Toulouse- Le Mirail/CNRS
Idjadi Djalal, enseignant, université Paris XIII
Jaillet Alain, maître de conférences, Université Louis Pasteur Strasbourg
Jenvrin Jean-Emile, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Khavand Fereydoun, maître de conférences, université Paris 5
Khosrokhavar Farhad, maître de conférence à EHESS
Kian Azadeh, CNRS, Paris
Lapassade Georges, professeur, université Paris 8
Lapeyronnie Dedier, professeur, EHESS,
Leconte J., AI, EHESS
Legrand Jean Louis, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Lepage Daniel, vice président de l'université Paris 8
Levead , professeur, sciences politiques Paris
Lourau René, professeur, université Paris 8
Longuenesse Beatrice , Professeur, CNRS-Princeton University
Longuenesse Elisabeth, CNRS, Lyon
Manoochehri Ehsan, enseignant, université Paris 8
Mansoor Hassan, professeur, American University of Paris
Mermier Franck , CNRS, Lyon
Mehl Dominique, directeur de recherche CNRS
Memat J, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Meurrier Christine, CNRS
Meyer Nicole, directeur de la formation permanente, université Paris 8
Mogoutov Andrei, Chercheur - ALRS,
Mostafavi Mehran, Professor, Université Paris Sud
Paivandi Saeed , maître de conférences, université Paris 8
PetitotJean, Directeur de l'Equipe d'Epistémologie Cognitive et du
Séminaire d'Epistémologie des Mathématiques, EHESS
Peroni, Michel , maitre de Conference de Sociologie/Universite Lyon2-lumiere
Rada Ivekovié, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Rahnema Ali, Professeur, American University of Paris
Rancière Jacques, professeur, université Paris 8
Rochex J. Y., maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Saintourens Michel, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Saleh Imad, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Sauvageot Claude, chercheur-enseignant, UNESCO, MEN
Scherer René, professeur, université Paris 8
Stavroula Bellos, maître de conférences, université Paris 8
Tcharkhtchi Abass, Professeur à l'ENSAM (Ecole Nationale Supériaure d'Arts
et Métiers)
Touraine Alain, professeur, EHESS
Traullet Claude, ACF, université Paris 8
Treff Isabelle , CNRS, Lyon
Vernier Bernard , Professeur, Universite Lyon2-Lumiere
Vidal Daniel, CNRS, EHESS
Vincent Jean Marie, professeur, université Paris 8
von Bawey Peter Michael, professeur, American University of Paris
Wievlorka Michel, directeur d'études, EHESS
Zakhartchouk Jean Michel, IUFM Paris




Contact
S. Paivandi
Maître de conférences
sciences de l'éducation
Université Paris 8
2 rue de la liberté
93526 St Denis
tél 01 49 40 67 81 fax 01 48 21 04 46 (en indiquant mon nom)
sp@univ-paris8.fr

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 4 Feb 1999 20:27:18 -0600
From: "Aryo B. Pirouznia" <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: Iranian Opponents in the Streets of Paris stopped the Islamic FM to
give his speech...

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Dear Friends, Dear Participants,
=20
The Clerical Foreign Minister, Kamal Kharazi, had to cancel his speech =
in the "International Relations Academy"
of Paris.
=20
The President of this famous Academy said to the participants and to the =
journalists: " It is the first time that an
official speaker is refusing, for any reason, to be present for his =
scheduled speech in the history of this academy..."
=20
Reports and news coming from the Capital of France are stating that at =
the occasion of this scheduled meeting,
today the February 4th 1999, several hundreds of Iranians and Frenchs =
were gathered in front of the building of
this academy; In order to protest to the presence of the clerical FM and =
the killings of the Iranian opponents in
the islamic republic...
=20
The same news are stating that despite a heavy police presence, kamal =
kharazi preferred to cancel his speech....

------=_NextPart_000_0255_01BE507C.C3ACC880
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charset="iso-8859-1"
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<HEAD>

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http-equiv=3DContent-Type><!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 =
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</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><BR></DIV></FONT>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>Dear Friends, Dear =
Participants,</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>The Clerical Foreign Minister, Kamal =
Kharazi,=20
had to cancel his speech in the "International Relations=20
Academy"</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>of Paris.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>The President of this famous Academy =
said to the=20
participants and to the journalists: " It is the first time that=20
an</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>official speaker is refusing, for =
any reason, to=20
be present for his scheduled speech in the history of this=20
academy..."</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>Reports and news coming from the =
Capital of=20
France are stating that at the occasion of this scheduled =
meeting,</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>today the February 4th 1999, several =
hundreds of=20
Iranians and Frenchs  were gathered in front of the building=20
of</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>this academy; In order to protest to =
the=20
presence of the clerical FM and the killings of the Iranian opponents=20
in</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>the islamic republic...</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>The same news are stating that =
despite a heavy=20
police presence, kamal kharazi preferred to cancel his=20
speech....</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>

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------------------------------

End of DNI-NEWS Digest - 3 Feb 1999 to 4 Feb 1999 - Special issue
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