Date: Feb 9, 1999 [ 0: 0: 0]

Subject: DNI-NEWS Digest - 7 Feb 1999 to 8 Feb 1999

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Subject: DNI-NEWS Digest - 7 Feb 1999 to 8 Feb 1999
To: Recipients of DNI-NEWS digests <DNI-NEWS@D-N-I.ORG>

There are 13 messages totalling 639 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Iran to tighten security in football stadiums
2. Iran accepts stray US missile hit was a "mistake"
3. Islamic liberals barred from Iran's landmark council elections
4. Iran stages first pop festival since revolution
5. New Jordanian leader "inexperienced": Iranian defense minister
6. 27 arrested in Iran intelligence crackdown
7. Iranian president sends condolences to Jordan's King Abdullah
8. Iran formally protests new king's "unfriendly remarks"
9. Rushdie Gives Magazine Interview
10. Iranian rial continues recovery after recent collapse
11. Iran protests as rest of world pays last respects to King Hussein
12. Iran protests as rest of world pays last respects to king Hussein
13. Appeal for help: Kahrizak Home for Disabled and Elderly

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Mon, 8 Feb 1999 20:07:14 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran to tighten security in football stadiums

TEHRAN, Feb 7 (AFP) - Iranian police said Sunday they will place
security cameras in Tehran football stadiums to tighten security and
prevent violence at matches.
The first cameras will be placed at Tehran's vast Azadi Stadium,
where there are regular incidents between police and rowdy fans,
according to state radio.
Cameras will allow police to keep an eye on troublemakers and
anyone throwing fire crackers onto the pitch, the radio said.
Police said they recently found large stocks of firecrackers
hidden inside the Azadi stadium, and arrested a number of suspects.
Football matches in the Azadi and Shirudi stadiums in Tehran
often degenerate into clashes between police and fans.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 8 Feb 1999 20:06:58 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran accepts stray US missile hit was a "mistake"

TEHRAN, Feb 7 (AFP) - Tehran accepted Sunday that a stray US
missile hit close to an Iranian border town which had prompted
Iranian protests to the United Nations was a genuine "mistake."
"It was a mistake," Defence Minister Ali Shamkhani told a news
conference here. "If there had been any ill intention on the part of
the US forces, we would have retaliated immediately," he said.
Earlier this month a stray US missile fired at Iraqi air defence
sites hit the outskirts of the border town of Abadan.
Foreign Minister Kamal Kharazi demanded compensation from the
United States for damage caused by the missile and vowed to raise
the issue at the United Nations.
"The United States should pay compensation, not just for the
material damage, but also for the non-material, psychological damage
caused by this violation of Iranian air space," he said.
And on Tuesday a group of Iranian students demonstrated at
Tehran university to demand tougher action against the United States
in response.
In December, during the four days of US and British strikes
against Iraq dubbed Operation Desert Fox, another stray cruise
missile hit the southern Iranian city of Khorramshahr.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 8 Feb 1999 20:07:21 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Islamic liberals barred from Iran's landmark council elections

TEHRAN, Feb 7 (AFP) - Islamic liberals will be barred from
running for Iran's first ever municipal elections later this month,
Vice-President Hassan Habibi said Sunday.
Habibi, a member of the arbitrating committee set up to resolve
a growing political row over barred candidates, said members of the
liberal Freedom Movement of Iran (FMI) cannot run in the poll as the
group is illegal.
According to the law "members of illegal organisations and
parties cannot run for elections," he said in comments published by
the English language Tehran Times.
Members of the banned but tolerated FMI, an Islamic liberal
opposition movement, have been disqualified along with reformist
supporters of President Mohammed Khatami by conservative-dominated
election supervision committees.
The disqualification of moderate and left-wing candidates has
sparked a war of words between Khatami supporters and his
conservative opponents.
Moderate Interior Minister Abdulvahed Musavi Lari, whose
ministry is responsible for running the elections through executive
committees around the country, has attacked the move to bar the
candidates as "arbitrary".
But the conservatives have hit back, saying the minister is
politicising the poll.
Iran's late revolutionary leader, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini,
slammed the FMI, the main domestic opposition movement here, as too
liberal and pro-Western and Habibi, himself a moderate, said it
should be judged on the basis of the ayatollah's remarks.
The landmark vote is considered the Islamic regime's first great
test in local democracy, but it has provoked tension between
conservatives and reformers as both sides seek to consolidate their
local power base ahead of next year's parliamentary elections.
Moderates are concerned that vetting candidates will dampen
public enthusiasm and lead to a low turnout, particularly among the
country's 30 million or so youngsters who played a decisive role in
bringing Khatami to office in 1997.
About 330,000 candidates, including 5,000 women, have been
approved so far to stand in elections for 200,000 council seats.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 8 Feb 1999 20:07:46 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran stages first pop festival since revolution

TEHRAN, Feb 7 (AFP) - Live pop music returned to Iran Sunday for
the first time in 20 years as the Islamic authorities staged the
first in a series of concerts to mark the anniversary of the 1979
revolution.
A huge banner behind the stage proclaimed: "The First Popular
Music Festival," over an image of a shooting star with a keyboard in
its wake.
The music was Iranian pop rather than its illegal Western
counterpart but the instrumentation and heavy percussion showed an
unmistakeably Western influence.
Several hundred people crowded into the concert hall in the
working class suburbs of south Tehran, but the demand was not
overwhelming to see the first officially-sanctioned live pop concert
since the revolution.
Perhaps another hundred people stood around outside forlornly
having failed to secure a ticket.
The crowd was largely drawn from the wealthier districts of
north Tehran judging by its dress.
"The (two-dollar) tickets are expensive for people in this part
of town," said a girl in the audience who asked not to be named.
"In any case many of the people around here don't like this sort
of thing -- the older people prefer traditional or classical music
and the younger people prefer genuine Western pop," said the girl in
her 20s and herself from north Tehran.
The performer for the opening night, Khashayar Etemadi, is loved
by many young people here for the similiarity of his voice to
Dariush, a popular pop singer before the revolution, who now lives
in exile in Los Angeles.
The emigre Iranian music of California is still banned by the
authorities here who regard it as "vulgar."
The local version which they now tolerate has a similar musical
accompaniment but the love themes which dominate the lyrics outside
Iran are replaced with uplifting poetry.
Two of the backing vocalists and all three violinists were
female and there was no attempt to segregate the audience which was
made up roughly equally of men and women.
Etemadi insists his music is entirely a product of the Islamic
Republic.
"The popular music being performed here is music from today's
Islamic Iran, and it is wrong to compare it to imported music," he
told the daily Sobh-e-Emrooz ahead of the concert.
He said that the aim of the festival, which runs on to Feb 17,
is as a showcase for pop music which is in harmony with "popular
values and those of an Islamic society."
His music appeals to some people -- "I wanted to come and see
him here because I like his cassettes," said Nemat, a student in his
20s. "I think they'll hold festivals like this every year from now
on."
But others say the officially-tolerated pop is a pale version of
the real thing.
"You really can't compare the two," said another young girl in
the audience. "But it's the event that mattered tonight."

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 8 Feb 1999 20:07:29 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: New Jordanian leader "inexperienced": Iranian defense minister

TEHRAN, Feb 7 (AFP) - Iranian Defence Minister Ali Shamkhani
described Jordan's new ruler, Abdallah ibn Hussein, as
"inexperienced" on Sunday after he charged that Tehran remained a
threat to some Gulf states.
"I put it down to inexperience," Admiral Shamkhani said at a
news conference held shortly before the announcement that Abdallah's
father, King Hussein, had died after a long battle with cancer.
"Experience of the real world will soon put a stop to this sort
of position-taking," he said.
Shamkhani said that it was too soon to make a judgement on
Abdallah, who was declared regent Saturday as his father lay dying.
In an interview with the London-based Arabic newspaper Al-Hayat
Saturday the 37-year-old Abdallah said Tehran "remains a threat to
the security of certain Gulf countries."
His reported comments sparked an angry response in the Tehran
press.
"At the beginning of his reign of his reign the regent must be
very cautious not to make irresponsible statements, for such
comments would put his rule in jeopardy," said an editorial in the
English-language Tehran Times.
"Let us hope that Jordan under the new regent will join hands
with the Islamic Republic of Iran and other regional countries to
safeguard the interests of the Islamic world," it said.
Throughout its 20 years in power, Iran's Islamic regime has been
a staunch opponent of the accommodation with the Jewish state
advocated throughout his life by King Hussein.
Amman and Tehran restored diplomatic relations in 1991 after a
10-year break.
But Jordan has been increasingly critical of Iran as it has
moved closer to the Gulf states.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 8 Feb 1999 20:08:05 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: 27 arrested in Iran intelligence crackdown

TEHRAN, Feb 7 (AFP) - Iranian officials arrested 27 people for
spying and treason, including 10 members of the outlawed opposition
People's Mujahedeen, the intelligence ministry said Sunday.
A 10-member team from the Mujahedeen was arrested in the western
Hamadan province, as well as 16 others who were caught with a
variety of prohibited materials including satellite dishes, the
ministry said, cited by the official IRNA news agency.
It said a spy who "intended to gather intelligence on military
installations" had also been arrested with the assistance of local
citizens.
"This spy working for the aliens has confessed to his
treasonable acts," the ministry said.
It did not specify the date of the arrests.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 8 Feb 1999 20:08:11 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iranian president sends condolences to Jordan's King Abdullah

TEHRAN, Feb 8 (AFP) - Iranian President Mohammad Khatami sent
his condolences to Jordan on Sunday following the death of King
Hussein, congratulating the new king Abdallah Ibn Hussein on his
accession.
Khatami condoled the king, "the Hashemite family, the government
and the people of Jordan," the official IRNA news agency said.
He congratulated the king's ascendance to the throne in another
message, expressing hope "for the strengthening of bilateral
relations."
Khatami prayed for King Abdallah's "sound health", and the
"prosperity, well-being and progress of the Moslem nation and
Jordan."
An Iranian delegation may attend funeral ceremonies on Monday,
according to the English language Tehran Times.
In an interview with the London-based Arabic newspaper Al-Hayat
Saturday, the 37-year-old Abdallah was quoted as saying Tehran
"remains a threat to the security of certain Gulf countries."
Iran's Defense Minister Ali Shamkhani Sunday blamed
"inexperience" for the reported remarks by the new king, and said
"experience of the real world will soon put a stop to this sort of
position-taking".

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 8 Feb 1999 20:08:28 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran formally protests new king's "unfriendly remarks"

TEHRAN, Feb 8 (AFP) - The Iranian foreign ministry called in the
Jordanian ambassador Monday to formally protest "unfriendly remarks"
attributed to new King Abdallah as world leaders gathered for the
funeral of his father king Hussein.
Officials informed the Jordanian envoy of Iran's "displeasure"
at comments attributed to the king by London-based Arabic newspaper
Al-Hayat on Saturday in which he was quoted as saying that Tehran
"remains a threat to the security of certain Gulf countries," state
radio said.
The ambassador said that the quotes had been "distorted" and
denied the king had made any hostile remarks against Iran, it said.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 8 Feb 1999 20:08:45 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Rushdie Gives Magazine Interview

NEW YORK (AP) -- Observing the 10th anniversary of the Iranian
``fatwa'' condemning him for blasphemous writings, British author
Salman Rushie says the death threat has given him a stronger
commitment to literary freedom.
``A writer's injuries are his strengths, and from his wounds
will flow his sweetest, most startling dreams,'' Rushdie wrote in a
brief essay in the Feb. 15 issue of the New Yorker magazine.
The title, ``My Unfunny Valentine,'' refers to the date -- Feb.
14, 1989 -- on which Iran's Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini told Muslims
worldwide it was their duty to kill Rushdie for having insulted
Islam in his 1988 novel, ``The Satanic Verses.''
With a $2.5 million price on his head, Rushdie spent most of the
next 10 years in hiding.
``Life can be harsh, and for a decade St. Valentine's Day has
reminded me of that harshness,'' he says. ``But these dark
anniversaries of the appalling valentine I was sent in 1989 have
also been times to reflect on the countervailing value of love...
At the center of my life, of my new work, of my future plans, I now
find nothing else.''
The Iranian government has since distanced itself from the death
decree.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 8 Feb 1999 20:09:10 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iranian rial continues recovery after recent collapse

TEHRAN, Feb 3 (AFP) - The Iranian rial continued to recover
ground against major currencies on the illegal open-exchange market
Monday following its recent collapse to record lows.
Iran's currency was trading at around 7,800 rials to the dollar
on Monday afternoon, up from 8,100 last Wednesday and a record low
of 8,750 the day before.
The rial changed hands at 7,500 to the dollar some 10 days ago.
Dealers attributed the recovery to "market conditions" and
recent official remarks blaming psychological rather than economic
factors for the dramatic fall.
Mohammad Ali Najafi, head of the state Plan and Budget
Organisation, said Sunday the currency's freefall was a result of
"the psychological impact of parliamentary debates on the budget"
for the coming financial year.
Late last month MPs approved an austerity package of spending
cuts and tax increases to tackle the mounting economic crisis after
two weeks of often stormy debate.
Najafi also attributed the rial's fall to increased demand for
foreign currency from people travelling abroad for the Iranian new
year on March 21.
The currency's slide has continued relentlessly for several
months -- late last year the rial crashed through the 6,000 and
7,000 thresholds against the dollar within weeks.
Iran is currently facing a foreign exchange crunch prompted by
plummetting prices on world markets for Iran's main export, oil.
The government banned the open exchange market four years ago in
an effort to prevent the collapse of the rial against major foreign
currencies.
The government maintains three official exchange rates of 1,750,
3,000 and 5,700 rials to the dollar -- for state transactions,
licensed exporters and some travellers authorised to receive hard
currency, respectively.
But the English-language Tehran Times on Monday urged the
government to scrap the different rates in favour of a unified
exchange rate.
"A single rate will help wipe out the black market and cure the
nation's ailing economy as well," the paper quoted "experts" as
saying.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 8 Feb 1999 20:09:16 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran protests as rest of world pays last respects to King Hussein

TEHRAN, Feb 8 (AFP) - Tehran issued a formal protest to Amman
and the Iranian press blasted the Jordanian royal family as leaders
of the rest of the world gathered to pay their last respects to King
Hussein on Monday.
In stark contrast to the wave of sympathy elsewhere in the
world, Tehran newspapers blasted both king Hussein and his son and
heir King Abdallah amid continuing hostility here to the Hashemite
kingdom's close ties with the West.
Foreign Minister Kamal Kharazi said Tehran was still unhappy
with Amman's explanation of harsh criticism of Iran attributed to
Jordan's new King Abdallah by an Arabic newspaper on Saturday.
"We have asked for an explanation and we are waiting for the
final position," Kharazi told a news conference here.
The foreign ministry summoned the Jordanian ambassador Sunday
evening after the London-based paper Al-Hayat quoted the king as
saying that Tehran "remains a threat to the security of certain Gulf
countries."
"Jordan's ambassador denied it, we are still waiting for an
official denial from the Jordanian government," Kharazi said.
"The position of the Jordanian government should be announced
officially," he said.
Iran's moderate President Mohammad Khatami had earlier sent his
condolences to Amman, expressing sympathy for the king, "the
Hashemite family, the government and the people of Jordan."
But in contrast to the array of world leaders attending King
Hussein's funeral, Iran sent only its ambassador.
"In such a short time we could not send anyone to participate,
so the ambassador will represent Iran," Kharazi said.
In another message, Khatami congratulated the king on his
accession to the throne and said he hoped it would lead to "the
strengthening of bilateral relations" and the "prosperity,
well-being and progress of the Moslem nation and Jordan."
But Tehran papers, both left-wing and conservative, slammed the
Hashemite royal family and their Western ties.
Abrar, close to conservatives here, called Abdallah the "British
king of Jordan" in reference to his British mother, and accused him
of wishing to "carry out a colonial policy of creating divisions
between Iran and the Arabs."
The hardline Jomhuri Islami reported Jordanian opposition
charges of "corruption and suppression of liberties" by the
"government and advisers" of King Hussein who died of cancer on
Sunday.
Newspapers highlighted the king's friendly relations with the
Islamic Republic's enemies Israel and the United States and with the
shah of Iran, toppled by the Islamic revolution 20 years ago this
week.
"All the indications are that Abdallah is the follower of his
father's policies and will promote his father's ties with the United
States and Israel," said the English-language Iran News.
The leftist paper Salam, close to President Khatami, recalled
King Hussein's "record of treachery to the Palestinian cause" and
his support for Iraq during its eight-year war against Iran in the
1980s.
The paper said the late monarch had spent "depraved evenings" in
Tehran in the company of his close friend, shah Mohammad Reza
Pahlavi, reminding readers that the late revolutionary leader
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini had called King Hussein a "repulsive
person."
King Hussein was a regular guest at Iran's imperial court, often
joining the shah for holidays on the Caspian coast.
Salam concluded with a veiled call on Jordanians to rise in
revolt, saying it was waiting for the day when "the people of
Jordan, like the Moslem people of Iran, will be master of its own
destiny, and will not allow Zionism and dictatorship to violate its
dignity."
Tehran broke off relations with Amman following the Islamic
revolution, restoring them only in 1991, and has been a staunch
opponent of the accommodation with the Jewish state advocated
throughout his life by king Hussein.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 8 Feb 1999 20:08:35 GMT
From: Farhad Abdolian <farhad@ALGONET.SE>
Subject: Iran protests as rest of world pays last respects to king Hussein

TEHRAN, Feb 8 (AFP) - Tehran issued a formal protest to Amman
and the Iranian press blasted the Jordanian royal family as leaders
of the rest of the world gathered to pay their last respects to king
Hussein on Monday.
In stark contrast to the wave of sympathy elsewhere in the
world, Tehran newspapers blasted both king Hussein and his son and
heir King Abdallah amid continuing hostility here to the Hashemite
kingdom's close ties with the West.
The foreign ministry called in the Jordanian envoy to inform him
of Tehran's "displeasure" at "unfriendly remarks" attributed to King
Abdallah by an Arabic newspaper, state radio reported as world
leaders gathered for king Hussein's funeral.
The London-based paper Al-Hayat on Saturday had quoted the king
as saying that Tehran "remains a threat to the security of certain
Gulf countries."
During the meeting Sunday evening, the Jordanian ambassador
denied that the king had made any hostile remarks against Iran,
foreign ministry spokesman Hamid Reza Asefi said.
He assured Iranian officials that Al-Hayat had "distorted" King
Abdallah's remarks, Asefi told the official news agency IRNA.
Iran's moderate President Mohammad Khatami had earlier sent his
condolences to Amman, expressing sympathy for the king, "the
Hashemite family, the government and the people of Jordan."
In another message he congratulated the king on his accession to
the throne and said he hoped it would lead to "the strengthening of
bilateral relations."
He prayed for King Abdallah's "sound health," and the
"prosperity, well-being and progress of the Moslem nation and
Jordan," the official news agency said.
But in contrast to the array of world leaders attending king
Hussein's funeral, Iran sent only its ambassador and Tehran papers,
both left-wing and conservative, slammed the Hashemite kingdom's
Western ties.
Abrar, close to conservatives here, called Abdallah the "British
king of Jordan" in reference to his British mother, and accused him
of wishing to "carry out a colonial policy of creating divisions
between Iran and the Arabs."
The hardline Jomhuri Islami reported Jordanian opposition
charges of "corruption and suppression of liberties" by the
"government and advisers" of King Hussein who died of cancer on
Sunday.
Newspapers highlighted the king's friendly relations with the
Islamic Republic's enemies Israel and the United States and with the
shah of Iran, toppled by the Islamic revolution 20 years ago this
week.
"All the indications are that Abdallah is the follower of his
father's policies and will promote his father's ties with the United
States and Israel," said the English-language Iran News.
The leftist paper Salam, close to President Mohammad Khatami,
recalled king Hussein's "record of treachery to the Palestinian
cause" and his support for Iraq during its eight-year war against
Iran in the 1980s.
The paper said the late monarch had spent "depraved evenings" in
Tehran in the company of his close friend, shah Mohammad Reza
Pahlavi, reminding readers that the late revolutionary leader
Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini had called King Hussein a "repulsive
person."
King Hussein was a regular guest at Iran's imperial court, often
joining the shah for holidays on the Caspian coast.
Salam concluded with a veiled call on Jordanians to rise in
revolt, saying it was waiting for the day when "the people of
Jordan, like the Moslem people of Iran, will be master of its own
destiny, and will not allow Zionism and dictatorship to violate its
dignity."
Tehran broke off relations with Jordan following the Islamic
revolution, restoring them only in 1991, and has been a staunch
opponent of the accommodation with the Jewish state advocated
throughout his life by king Hussein.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 8 Feb 1999 21:02:56 +0100
From: "Payman Arabshahi (by way of Farhad Abdolian <farhad@algonet.se>)"
<payman@ARCADIA.JPL.NASA.GOV>
Subject: Appeal for help: Kahrizak Home for Disabled and Elderly

This is the largest, best organized and managed, and in all respects the
most reputable and caring of all non-profit non-governmental charity
organizations in Iran. It enjoys excellent professional facilities and a
truly dedicated and mostly volunteer staff.

Please consider helping out ...

Thanks

-Payman

--
California Institute of Technology Tel: (818) 393-6054
Jet Propulsion Laboratory Fax: (818) 393-1717
4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 238-343 Email: payman@jpl.nasa.gov
Pasadena, CA 91109 USA http://dsp.jpl.nasa.gov/~payman






Kahrizak Home for Disabled and Elderly

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

History:

Kahrizak home for the disabled and elderly (KHDE), founded in 1971, is the
only charitable organization of this kind in Iran. It provides long-term
medical care, rehabilitation therapy and sense of community and belonging
for those suffering severe disability and infirmities of age.

At that time, this institution was only a concept taking shape in the mind
of its founder Dr. Mohammad Reza Hakimzadeh. As chief administrator of a
large, private Tehran hospital, he was deeply disturbed by the lack of
total health care facilities for the grievously handicapped and aged who
could not afford medical attention.

Today, as a result of the late Dr. Hakimzadeh's initiative and efforts in
attracting philanthropic associates, KHDE is a model humanitarian social
service/medical center and self contained community catering to the needs
of about 2,000 residents.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Facts and Figures:

Average cost per patient: 550,000 Rls/month
Number of doctors: 10 salaried, 20 volunteer
Number of Nurses: 250 salaried, 400 volunteer

New facilities are currently planned in Gilan, Mashhad, Qazvin and Zanjan.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

How you can Help:

Kahrizak center exsits solely on the basis of contributions. Upwards of
95% of the residents are from the families who can not afford a minimum of
the necessary medical care for their loved ones, or who have no family at
all. 70% of those receiving care are women.

In keeping with its humanitarian objectives KHDE renders services to all
minorities and religious denominations in Iran on a free and equal basis.

If you are interested in making a contribution, donations are welcomed in
cash, property, estate, materials and services. Further information on
how you can help can be obtained by contacting KHDE directly.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Cash Donations:

(Iran)

Bank Melli, Nejatollahi street
Account number: 42215

Bank Saderat, Shahr Rey, Bagher Abad Branch
Code 1248, Account number: 700

Bank Saderat, Zafaranieh branch
Code 820, Account number: 1380

Andokhteh Nikan Fund, Ferdowsi Branch
Account No.: 225258

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Overseas and Foreign Currency Donations:

Bank Saderat (Tehran), Vahdat eslami
code: 129, Account number: 20125

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Abroad Donations:

(USA)

Bank of America, New York & Los Angeles
2223
Account number: 07476-09370


(UK)

NWB, St. John's Wood, London
Account number: 41409329

For making material, services and property donations please call

Hospital: (+98 21) 520-1616 through 8
Office: (+98 21) 520-2900

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------

End of DNI-NEWS Digest - 7 Feb 1999 to 8 Feb 1999
*************************************************