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There are 15 messages totalling 1386 lines in this issue.

Topics in this special issue:

1. France's Elf signs Iran oilfield deal -2
2. Oil Company Announces Deal with Canada, Iran
3. France's Elf Signs Iran Oilfield Deal
4. French, Canadian Consortium Signs Oil Deal with
5. Focus-Elf Signs Iran Oilfield Deal
6. Middle East Economic Briefs
7. Iran Tells U.N. Head of Concern Over Kosovo
8. RADIO FREE EUROPE/IRAN REPORT-Part 1/2
9. RADIO FREE EUROPE/IRAN REPORT - Part 2/2
10. Iran Deal Defies US Sanctions
11. Deal to Develop Iranian Oil Field
12. Lockerbie Suspects Arrive in Netherlands for Trial
13. Iranian-Americans: Who Are We Becoming?
14. Lockerbie Skeptical Ahead Of Suspects' Trial
15. Wrestling Results

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Apr 1999 16:43:56 EDT
From: Bobby Iri <Bobby@WWW.DCI.CO.IR>
Subject: France's Elf signs Iran oilfield deal -2

France's Elf signs Iran oilfield deal -2
========================================


02:56 p.m Apr 04, 1999 Eastern
France's Elf signs Iran oilfield deal -2

The United States has frowned on French oil investments in Iran
in the past, but Washington has refraining from applying
sanctions envisaged in U.S. legislation aimed at discouraging
companies from doing business with Libya and Iran.

A French foreign ministry spokesman said France does not
recognise the legality of the extra-territorial reach of the
U.S. legislation.
``Elf is free to sign contracts in Iran if it wants. It's a
commercial decision,'' the spokesman said.

Elf said the Balal field lies 100 km south of Lavan Island in
the Gulf at a depth of 70 metres and has recoverable reserves
estimated at 100 million barrels of good quality oil.

``The contract is of a buy-back nature, which provides for the
consortium to be reimbursed and paid in the form of crude oil
from the field,'' it said, adding the term of the contract was
about six years.

((Paris Newsroom, +33 1 4221 5452, fax +33 1 4236 1072,
paris.newsroom+reuters.com))


Copyright 1999 Reuters Limited.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Apr 1999 16:44:02 EDT
From: Bobby Iri <Bobby@WWW.DCI.CO.IR>
Subject: Oil Company Announces Deal with Canada, Iran

Oil Company Announces Deal with Canada, Iran
============================================


AP
04-APR-99


PARIS (AP) -- A consortium made up of Canada's Bow Valley Energy
Ltd. and Elf Petroleum Iran has signed a contract with the
National Iranian Oil Company to develop the offshore Balal oil
field, France's Elf Aquitaine announced Sunday.


The cost of the project is estimated at $300 million, and the
first oil from Balal -- some 40,000 barrels a day -- is expected
in 2001.

Balal is located about 60 miles southwest of Lavan Island in the
Persian Gulf. Reserves there are estimated at 100 million
barrels of "good quality oil," a statement by Elf said.


Elf Petroleum Iran is a subsidiary of Paris-based Elf Aquitaine.


The consortium is to be reimbursed and paid in crude oil in the
six-year contract, the statement said.


Copyright 1999& The Associated Press.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Apr 1999 16:43:52 EDT
From: Bobby Iri <Bobby@WWW.DCI.CO.IR>
Subject: France's Elf Signs Iran Oilfield Deal

France's Elf Signs Iran Oilfield Deal
=====================================


01:04 a.m. Apr 05, 1999 Eastern
PARIS (Reuters) - A consortium led by French oil giant Elf
Aquitaine and Canada's Bow Valley Energy Ltd. has signed an
agreement with the National Iranian Oil Co. to develop the
offshore Balal oilfield, Elf said Sunday.

It said the overall cost of the project was estimated at $300
million. ``First oil from Balal of around 40,000 barrels a day
is planned for 2001,'' it said in a statement.

The United States has frowned on French oil investments in Iran
in the past, but Washington has refraining from applying
sanctions envisaged in U.S. legislation aimed at discouraging
companies from doing business with Libya and Iran.

A French foreign ministry spokesman said France does not
recognize the legality of the extra-territorial reach of the
U.S. legislation.

``Elf is free to sign contracts in Iran if it wants. It's a
commercial decision,'' the spokesman said.

Elf said the Balal field lies 100 km south of Lavan Island in
the Gulf at a depth of 70 meters and has recoverable reserves
estimated at 100 million barrels of good quality oil.

``The contract is of a buy-back nature, which provides for the
consortium to be reimbursed and paid in the form of crude oil
from the field,'' it said, adding the term of the contract was
about six years.

Copyright 1999 Reuters Limited.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Apr 1999 16:44:08 EDT
From: Bobby Iri <Bobby@WWW.DCI.CO.IR>
Subject: French, Canadian Consortium Signs Oil Deal with

French, Canadian Consortium Signs Oil Deal with
===============================================
Xinhua
04-APR-99

Iran

TEHRAN (April 4) XINHUA - A consortium formed by Elf Aquitaine
of France and Bow Valley of Canada signed a deal here Sunday
night with National Iranian Oil Company (NIOC) to develop Iran's
offshore Balal oil-field on the "buy-back" scheme.

The Islamic Republic News Agency (IRNA) reported that Elf
Aquitaine would hold 85 percent and Bow Valley the rest 15
percent of the contract valued at 300 million U.S. dollars.

The oil field is 100 kilometers southwest of Lavan island in the
Persian Gulf in a water depth of 70 meters and has recoverable
reserves estimated at 119 million barrels of good quality oil.

Iranian Deputy Oil Minister Mehdi Husseini told IRNA that the
first oil of around 40,000 barrels per day would be pumped in
2001 and the term of the contract is about six years.

Last month, Elf Aquitaine and an Italian company also signed a
deal to boost Iran's oil production in Iran's Dorood oil and gas
field.

The contracts defied the U.S. Iran-Libya Sanction Act, which
bans investment of more than 20 million U.S. dollars in Iran's
energy sectors.

Iran has called for the lifting of the U.S. sanction law, saying
that all foreign oil firms, including U.S. companies, are
welcomed to make investments in Iran.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Apr 1999 16:44:18 EDT
From: Bobby Iri <Bobby@WWW.DCI.CO.IR>
Subject: Focus-Elf Signs Iran Oilfield Deal

Focus-Elf Signs Iran Oilfield Deal
==================================


Reuters
04-APR-99

PARIS, April 4 (Reuters) - French oil major Elf Aquitaine
(ELFP.PA) and Canada's Bow Valley Energy (BVX.TO) have signed a
contract to develop an Iranian offshore oilfield, Elf said on
Sunday, announcing its second deal with Iran in just over a
month.

Its subsidiary Elf Petroleum Iran has an 85 percent interest and
will be the operator for the Balal oil project, whose cost it
estimated at $300 million.

The United States has frowned on European oil investments in
Iran in the past, and France's Total (TOTF.PA) nearly sparked a
diplomatic row in 1997 when it announced a $2 billion gas deal
with Iran.

But Washington held back from applying sanctions contained in
U.S. legislation aimed at discouraging companies from doing
business with Libya and Iran. Both are accused by the U.S.
government of sponsoring terrorism, but deny the charges.

In Total's case, the Clinton administration finally issued a
waiver for the deal, citing the European Union's cooperation on
curtailing Iran's capability to produce banned weapons.

A French foreign ministry spokesman said France does not
recognise the legality of the extra-territorial reach of the
U.S. legislation. "Elf is free to sign contracts in Iran if it
wants. It's a commercial decision," the spokesman told Reuters.

Elf said the Balal field lies 100 km south of Lavan Island in
the Gulf at a depth of 70 metres and has recoverable reserves
estimated at 100 million barrels of good quality oil.

"First oil from Balal of around 40,000 barrels a day is planned
for 2001," the company said in a statement.

It said the contract with the National Iranian Oil Co (NIOC) was
of a buy-back nature, which meant the consortium would be
reimbursed and paid in the form of crude oil from the field.

On March 1, Elf and Agip, a subsidiary of Italy's ENI (ENI.MI),
signed a $1 billion deal to redevelop Iran's offshore Doroud
oilfield in a similar buy-back contract.

Iran has the world's second-largest natural gas reserves and
fifth-largest pool of oil reserves. Last year it invited foreign
companies to tender for more than 40 oil and gas projects worth
over $8 billion.

"In line with NIOC's oilfield development plan, this contract
reflects Elf and Bow Valley strategies of increasing operations
in the Middle East," Elf said.

((Christine Tierney, Paris Newsroom, tel +33 1 4221 5452, fax
+33 1 4236 1072, e-mail paris.newsroom+reuters.com))


Copyright 1999 Reuters Limited.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Apr 1999 16:44:40 EDT
From: Bobby Iri <Bobby@WWW.DCI.CO.IR>
Subject: Middle East Economic Briefs

Middle East Economic Briefs
===========================


Xinhua
04-APR-99

CAIRO (April 4) XINHUA - The following are the economic briefs
from the Middle East countries:

CAIRO -- The Egyptian Minister of Trade and Supply Ahmed Goweili
has disclosed that Egypt's rice exports made big increase during
1998-1999.

By the beginning of March, rice exports amounted to some 226,000
tonnes as compared to 140,000 tonnes a year earlier, which means
an increase of 54 percent.

The minister said Turkey is the first among Egyptian rice
importers. Turkey's imports in the new season amounted to some
56,000 tons which represented 25 percent of Egypt's total rice
exports, followed by Syria, Rumania and Sudan.

Goweili pointed out that Egyptian rice exports to Israel have
also increased from 237 tonnes in the 1997-1998 to approximately
550 tonnes in the 1998-1999.

BAGHDAD -- The Iraqi Minister of Finance Hikmat Mizban Ibrahim
has announced that Iraq has decided to reduce customs duties on
U.S. and German-made private cars from 30 percent to 10 percent
of the import value.

The minister said that Iraq has also decided to cut customs
duties on cars made in other countries from 10 percent to 5
percent.

He pointed out that the decision was aimed at meeting the needs
of the transport sector and satisfying private demand.

JEDDAH -- The second Iranian commodity fair opens Sunday in
Jeddah, and is organized by Al Harthy Fairs company together
with the Iranian Drasayan company with the participation of
about 145 firms.

The Iranian commodities on display include industrial and
agricultural products as well as handicraft items. It exhibits a
wide ranges of vehicles, buses, building materials, automobile
spare parts, iron and steel, ceramics, household utensils and
electrical appliances, as well as the world-famed carpets.

The first fair of Iranian products was held in Riyadh late last
year, and had achieved important results. It was then attended
by large numbers of Saudis who were keen to learn about Iranian
products for the first time.

Trade exchanges between the two countries started to pick up in
the past few years, reaching 271 million dollars in volume in
1997, of which 213 million dollars represented Saudi exports to
Iran as compared to 58 million dollars of Iranian exports to
Saudi Arabia.

TEHRAN -- Wheat yield in Iran registered an annual rise of 7.9
percent in the past decade from 1989-1998, the Iranian
Agriculture Ministry announced on Sunday.

Iran's wheat output stood at about 6 million tonnes in 1989, but
it increased to over 11.9 million tonnes in 1998, a report from
the ministry was quoted by the Islamic Republic News Agency.

The value of the surplus wheat product in the past decade
amounted to 7.5 billion U.S. dollars on the basis of 200 dollars
per tonne, the report said.

The economic value of the rise in wheat production is even more
than the total investment made by both public and private
sectors in the agriculture field.

Iran's wheat consumption was reported at 10 million tonnes every
year.

TEHRAN -- A consortium formed by Elf Aquitaine of France and Bow
Valley of Canada signed a deal here on Sunday with National
Iranian Oil Company (NIOC) to develop Iran's offshore Balal
oilfield on the "buy-back" scheme.

Elf Aquitaine would hold 85 perc
ent and Bow Valley the rest 15
percent of the contract valued at 300 million U.S. dollars.

The oil field is 100 kilometers southwest of Lavan island in the
Persian Gulf in a water depth of 70 meters and has recoverable
reserves estimated at 119 million barrels of good quality oil.
Iranian Deputy Oil Minister Mehdi Husseini told IRNA that the
first oil of around 40,000 barrels per day would be pumped in
2001 and the term of the contract is about six years.

He said that the investment made by Elf and Bow Valley would be
returned in a period of three or four years after the oil field
begins to pump oil.

Last month, Elf Aquitaine and an Italian company also signed a
deal to boost Iran's oil production in Iran's Dorood oil and gas
field.

The contracts defied the U.S. Iran-Libya Sanction Act, which
bans investment of more than 20 million U.S. dollars in Iran's
energy sectors.

Iran has called for a lift of the U.S. sanction law and stated
that all foreign oil firms, including the American companies,
are welcomed to make investments in Iran.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Apr 1999 16:44:46 EDT
From: Bobby Iri <Bobby@WWW.DCI.CO.IR>
Subject: Iran Tells U.N. Head of Concern Over Kosovo

Iran Tells U.N. Head of Concern Over Kosovo
===========================================


Reuters
04-APR-99

TEHRAN, April 4 (Reuters) - The foreign minister of Iran, which
chairs the world's largest Islamic body, expressed concern about
the killing of Moslems in Kosovo during talks with the U.N.
chief, Iran's official news agency IRNA said on Sunday.

It said Kamal Kharrazi spoke with U.N. Secretary-General Kofi
Annan by telephone on Saturday and expressed concern about
"racial cleansing" in the southern Serbian province.

Kharrazi told Annan the Organisation of the Islamic Conference
(OIC), a 55-member group which Iran currently chairs, would hold
a meeting of its Kosovo contact group in Geneva on Wednesday.

Annan "expressed hope that the OIC contact group's efforts in
Geneva will be effective in finding a solution to the crisis,"
the agency said.

Iran's Deputy Foreign Minister Morteza Sarmadi, who returned
from a visit to Russia at the start of the month, was quoted by
Iranian radio on Sunday as saying NATO's strikes on Yugoslavia
had worsened the plight of Kosovo's Moslems.

He also blamed their suffering on the "stubbornness" of Yugoslav
President Slobodan Milosevic.

"Iran and Russia believe any military action against any
offending country should be taken with permission from the
(U.N.) Security Council," Sarmadi was quoted as saying.


Copyright 1999 Reuters Limited.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Apr 1999 18:28:10 EDT
From: Bobby Iri <Bobby@WWW.DCI.CO.IR>
Subject: RADIO FREE EUROPE/IRAN REPORT-Part 1/2

RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC
_____________________________________________________________
RFE/RL IRAN REPORT
Vol. 2, No. 14, 5 April 1999

A Review of Developments in Iran Prepared by the Regional
Specialists of RFE/RL's Newsline Team.

KHATAMI'S FRENCH TRIP CANCELED
President Hojatoleslam Mohammad Khatami was scheduled to
go to France in April. On 29 March, however, the Islamic
Republic News Agency announced that the visit "cannot take
place" because the French government failed to comply with
the requirement that "Islamic rules be observed." Apparently,
the "dialogue between civilizations" must be conducted
according to Iranian demands.
Paris' "Liberation" daily reported on 29 March that the
stumbling block is wine at the table. Hubert Dumont-Chastel
of the French Parliament's France-Iran friendship committee
said they had complied with all the Iranians' requirements
regarding food preparation, but when they said there should
not be even a bottle on the table, "we judged that to be
unacceptable." Dumont-Chastel was very irritated by this
"Iranian arrogance."
Another possible reason for the trip's cancellation is
concern about the presence of Iranian oppositionists or
others who might cause embarrassment for Khatami in France.
Khatami was heckled and his car was pelted with eggs when he
visited Rome in early March. Moreover, at the same time,
condemned British author Salman Rushdie was receiving an
honorary degree in Turin. Iranian officials and political
observers reacted angrily to what they saw as a breach of
protocol and warned that repetitions of the incident would
not be tolerated. (see "RFE/RL Iran Report," 22 March 1999)
And when Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi visited France in
February, he canceled an appearance for what the Foreign
Ministry referred to as inadequate security.
On the other hand, the concern over dinner table decorum
might be linked to factional politics in Iran. Khatami's
rivals may be trying to embarrass him and damage his
international prestige. Or he may want to avoid the
appearance of supporting the French role in the current
Kosovo crisis. (Bill Samii)


IRANIAN REACTION TO KOSOVO CRISIS
When NATO began airstrikes against Serbian military
forces conducting ethnic cleansing against Kosovo Albanians,
Iran found itself in what for some would be a quandary. From
a multilateral perspective, as chairman of the Organization
of the Islamic Conference (OIC), Iran has a responsibility to
speak out for the world's Muslims. From a bilateral
perspective, Iran is trying to support its Russian allies.
From a unilateral perspective, Iran has been expanding its
activities throughout the Balkans. But Iranian statements
have been fairly consistent so far.
President Hojatoleslam Mohammad Khatami said on 27
March, according to Iranian state television, that "Iran, as
a Muslim country concerned about the fate of Muslims and as
head of the Organization of the Islamic Conference, would not
tolerate the aggression against the rights of Muslims in
Kosovo and the Balkans." He went on to say the NATO
airstrikes are "illegal", and they would not benefit the
"oppressed Muslims of Kosovo." They would, he said "only
serve the interests of major powers who were seeking to
impose their domination over the Balkans."
When the airstrikes began, Iran, in its role as head of
the OIC, supported a request by the Bosnian UN representative
to call for a Security Council meeting, the Islamic Republic
News Agency reported on 27 March. And on 29 March, Muslim
member of the Bosnian presidency Alija Izetbegovic asked Iran
to intervene, which it promised to do.
When Iranian Ambassador to Tirana Mohammad Kazem Bigdeli
met with Albanian Democratic Party leader Sali Berisha,
Tirana's "Rilindja Demokratike" reported in late-February,
the main topic was the Kosovo crisis. At that meeting,
Bigdeli "expressed the readiness of his state and the Islamic
Conference member countries to support the just demands of
the Kosovar people in the international arena."
Bilaterally, Iran perceives the Balkans as part of
Russia's sphere-of-influence. Russia has consistently opposed
the threat of NATO airstrikes against Yugoslavia. And after
the airstrikes started, Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov
said "Those who have unleashed the aggression against
Yugoslavia must be prosecuted under criminal law," Interfax
reported on 26 March.
Iranian state radio and television recognizes Russia's
reasoning. In a 24 March broadcast, it commented "Another
reason to [sic] Russia's strong opposition to NATO military
action against Yugoslavia is their [sic] deep concern over
the alliance's eastward expansion." The next day, Iranian
state television commented: "[Moscow} is defending its own
traditional sphere of influence. ... Yeltsin has threatened
reciprocal action in areas of interest to the West."
Iran continues to communicate with Russia about the
issue. Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi and Ivanov discussed
the Kosovo crisis on 27 March, Itar-Tass reported, and they
"called for an immediate end to the aggression." In their
discussion the next day, Kharrazi called on Ivanov to
"persuade Belgrade to respect the fundamental rights of the
Muslim people of Kosovo. Russia's Defense Ministry also
consulted with Iranian military officials, Itar-Tass reported
on 31 March.
Of course, Iran has its own interests in the region. It
has aided Muslims in the Balkans militarily, culturally, and
religiously, and in recent years it has expanded its economic
ties there. (see "RFE/RL Iran Report," 25 January 1999 and 15
March 1999) In April 1998 the Kosovo Liberation Army's main
U.S. operative told the "Christian Science Monitor" that some
members of his organization want to accept "offers of weapons
and training" from Iran and other Islamic states. Then German
Defense Minister Volker Ruehe claimed that Iranians were
fighting alongside the Muslim Albanians, but Kharrazi
promised that this was untrue, Agence France Presse reported
on 15 July.
In Jangence France Presse reported
on 15 July.
In Jangence France Presse reported
on 15 July.
In January 1999, the English-language "Tehran Times,"
which is published by a branch of the Islamic Guidance and
Culture Ministry, blamed the "bloody experiences" in the
Balkans on "racist policies of Belgrade and double-standard
of the European countries." The complaint at the time was
that while the West is willing to bomb Iraq, it had done
nothing about Serbian "oppression of ethnic Albanian
Muslims." Therefore, said the daily, one can see that "the
West is following a double standard policy which is always
detrimental to the interests of the Muslims."
But even after NATO action began, Iranian state radio
was dissatisfied. In a 27 March commentary, it said that
"America, Britain, and France" had bypassed the UN because
they knew Russia and China opposed military operations
against Yugoslavia. The operation was being conducted,
furthermore, without proper evaluation of its "outcome and
ramifications." Iran's criticism has been even-handed. On 27
March, the Yugoslav chargé in Tehran was summoned to the
Foreign Ministry to hear a protest "against the massacre of
Muslim Albanians in Kosovo by Serbs," referring to the
killings in Suva Reka and Orahovac.
Iran has committed itself to more than diplomatic
initiatives. On 30 March IRNA announced that Iran will send
food, medicine, clothes, and shelters to Kosovar refugees
residing in Albania and Macedonia. (Bill Samii)


CREDIT REPAYMENTS AND LOANS DELAYED
As part of the recent rescheduling of Iran's debt, Japan
will provide approximately $820 million in low-interest loans
to finance the construction of a hydro-electric power station
in Khuzestan Province, Agence France Presse reported on 8
March. And in the last two months, credit agencies and banks
in Italy, France, and Germany also have rescheduled Iranian
debt repayments.
An article by officials in the Exports Office of the
Sales Department of the Bank of China in Peking's "Guoji
Shangbao" on 22 March , however, will not do much to inspire
confidence in these current creditors or in firms that may
want to do business with Iran. It used to take one month
between arrival of a cargo in Iran and receipt of a payment
for the letter of credit. But in the last six months the
situation has worsened and can take from four to six months.
Furthermore, the Bank of Iran often refuses to pay because of
so-called "mistakes" in the letter of credit. The Bank of
China was told that Iran's Central Bank must approve every
payment, so it takes "almost one year from the time letters
of credit are sent too the time payments are collected."
The Chinese bankers go on to write: "Conduct in
violation of the international norms is not rare with banks
in Iran." Examples include the Bank of Iran's refusal to pay
a $1 million letter of credit because "post code" had been
mis-spelled as "psot code." A common method of delaying
payments is for Bank of Iran branch offices to say they are
awaiting "instructions from the international department of
the head office."
The article concluded by warning firms that trade with
Iran "to fully take into account the risks of settling
accounts when doing business with Iran recently, and reduce
as much as possible the probability of suffering from
losses."
Domestic creditors are facing difficulties, too.
"Jomhuri-yi Islami" reported in February that members of a
civil service retiree society are unable to collect loans
from the retirement fund ifrom the retirement fund into which they paid
membership fees
and part of their salaries. A frequent excuse for the delay
is that members' dossiers are incomplete or have been lost.
An official from the retiree society said "These difficulties
and delays stem from the excess in demand." Nor should people
expect money soon. The official explained that because of
"the lack of budget at the end of this year, loans will be
paid next year." (Bill Samii)


"GREEN GOLD" TARNISHES ...
Iran's economy is overly dependent on its "black gold" -
oil. To lessen dependency on this literally and figuratively
volatile commodity, there have been efforts to diversify
through development of alternative industries. In the first
three months of 1999, however, non-oil exports fell 2 percent
to about $3 billion, according to Iranian customs chief Mehdi
Karbasian.
"Green gold" - the pistachio - is Iran's third largest
hard currency earner after oil and carpets, and it has the
potential to have the major share of the pistachio market.
Pistachios are "blood-producing, life-giving, and
intelligence-increasing," "Zan" daily reported in February.
Also, Iranian pistachios are viewed as tasty, have a high
nutritional value, and are hearty, growing in desert
conditions. Finally, they sell for about $2000 a ton, whereas
their American competitors sell for about $3600 a ton,
Reuters reports. Despite these strengths, pistachios have not
fulfilled their potential yet for three reasons.
Growers in the main pistachio-producing region - Kerman
Province - complain about insufficient help from the
government ministries, such as the Agriculture Ministry or
the Cooperatives Ministry. Pistachio producer Habib Etemadi
said: "The Agriculture Ministry local office will not give us
fertilizers, and for this reason we are obliged to obtain
them on the open market," Rafsanjan's "Kosar-i Kavir" daily
reported in November.
Despite this lack of help from the government, growers
told "Kosar-i Kavir," government imposed costs are high and
unreasonable. The most suspect one is a requirement for
advance payments to the government to ensure that foreign
currency earnings are repatriated. Other government charges
are high taxes, high rates for water and electricity, high
seasonal labor insurance charges, and restrictive customs
practices.
Seyyed Mohammad Reza Jafari, the parliamentary deputy
from Zarand, Kerman Province, told "Kerman-i Imruz" daily in
November that although creation of the Rafsanjan Pistachio
Producers Cooperative was a positive step, more help was
needed from the Cooperatives Ministry. And those growers who
are not members of the cooperative complain about
difficulties in marketing their nuts.
The Rafsanjan Pistachio Producers Cooperative is,
according to "Zan," Iran's main exporter of pistachios. But
it is failing to meet growers' needs. For an unknown reason,
the cooperative does not use the modern packaging equipment
which is available in Iran, so the consumer does not get an
appealing product. Also, the cooperative has not investigated
"mechanization of agriculture, especially modern and healthy
horticulture." Finally, the cooperative's advertising efforts
have been ineffective "because they have been dispersed,
disordered, and have lacked continuity."
Bottlenecks caused by poor planning are a second factor
holding back pistachios, according to a report in Tehran's
"Kar va Kargar" at the end of December. The daily said
Iranian agricultural goods are not competitive on price; and
they are of uneven quality, badly packaged, and do not
conform with customer preferences. They are poorly marketed,
and there is very little market research or pursuit of new
markets. Finally, exporters face unreasonable risks due to an
insufficient insurance system.
A third factor hindering the export of Iranian
pistachios is contamination with the toxic aflotoxin mold. In
1997 the European Union briefly banned imports of Iranian
pistachios due to alleged contamination, although Iranian
officials denied that their nuts were contaminated. The EU
now requires that all pistachio imports from Iran be tested,
which delays market access. Iranian nut sellers told Reuters
that they are facing politically-motivated discrimination,
because the EU aflotoxin standard for American pistachios is
20 parts per billion, while for Iranian pistachios it is 4
parts per billion. (Bill Samii)


... AND TEXTILES FADE
Another means by which Iran is attempting to decrease
its dependence on oil as the economy's main driver is through
development of the textile industry. Yet this too has failed
to live up to its potential or make much of a contribution.
Jamshid Basiri, head of the Iranian Textile Industries
Association, said the volume of textile exports had decreased
by 60 percent by the end of 1999, according to RFE/RL's
Persian Service. From March to December 1998, he said,
clothing exports decreased by 77 percent, carpeting exports
were down 54 percent, artificial weaves were down 57 percent,
and manufactured rugs were down 28 percent.
"The textile sector has problems that have reached
crisis conditions," "Keyhan" reported on 14 February. These
problems are typical of Iranian industry at large, and most
of them, according to industrial managers and Iranian
publications, can be traced to three factors.
A major factor, but one which rarely is discussed

<< Continued to next message >>>

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Apr 1999 18:28:36 EDT
From: Bobby Iri <Bobby@WWW.DCI.CO.IR>
Subject: RADIO FREE EUROPE/IRAN REPORT - Part 2/2

<< This message is part 2 of a previous message >>>

directly, is corruption. On 26 January, however, Tehran's
"Imruz" daily took on this subject as it applies to the
Iranian economy, which is "like an iceberg. Its visible part
is the smaller part, and those who are the ultimate
determinative are in hiding under the water. ... In Iran's
economy, the rules of play are determined under water, and if
a person does not know about swimming under water, he will
probably ruin himself, and destroy his capital."
Part of this corruption is the unnecessary import of
goods which crowd out domestic products. Professor Iraj
Tutunchian of Qom's Al-Zahra University (Jamiat-i Az-Zahra)
told "Imruz" he thinks most of those who import goods
unnecessarily are "affiliated to the holders of power and
influential men." Professor Fariborz Raisdana said "90
percent of importers are relations of officials." And
Professor Ali Rashidi said "The personal and private
profiteering mood is dominant in many foreign bargains, and
this situation has slowed down the freeing of trade."
Basiri said that after the revolution cotton had be
imported. So the Commerce Ministry established centers to buy
cotton from abroad. Instead, said Basiri, "these units
imported thread and cloth. Instead of cotton! This measure
dealt the textile industry of the country an irreparable
blow, and saturated the domestic market with foreign goods."
Also, the government fails to provide the necessary
legal or investment support. The manager of the textile
industries of the Oppressed and Disabled Foundation (Bonyad-i
Mostazafan va Janbazan), the Tehran daily "Imruz" reported on
13 February, lays the blame "on the Central Bank for its
foreign exchange policies, the Finance Ministry for its
taxes, the Labor Ministry for its labor law, and the Commerce
Ministry for importing thread."
An exporter complained to "Keyhan" about "parallel,
similar, and confused regulations." Also, officials are
unfriendly and unhelpful with exporters and investors, and
the regulations allow them to get away with such behavior.
Also, the sales manager of a Kermanshah textile factory told
"Imruz," "owing to the lack of a special tariff on imports,
imported thread is delivered to consumers much cheaper than
the domestic product, and this difference had encouraged
imports." A provincial official in Isfahan told "Keyhan" that
the laws and regulations on industry and exports change
frequently, so that "sometimes there are only a few weeks
between the approval and cancellation of new laws." These
changes affect foreign exchange, export and consumer laws,
credit facilities, and opening letters of credit. Also, there
are varying charges and duties, particularly on state-
provided services like water and electricity.
A third factor hindering the textile industry is
mismanagement. When eight textile factories belonging to the
Oppressed and Disabled Foundation were threatened with
closure in January, there were calls for regulatory changes.
(see RFE/RL Iran Report," 18 January 1999) But a report in
"Imruz" suggests the problems can be found within the
Foundation itself. The article says "the role of trial and
error in the management of this institute is out of the
ordinary." Among the consequences of this were a "cashflow
deficit, delayed debts, stockpiling of produced goods, [and]
payment of enormous taxes."
Other managerial problems relate to the production
methods. A manager told "Keyhan" that his firm tries to use
modern methods, but in a country with extremely high
unemployment, labor-intensive methods should be used instead.
He also complained about unskilled manpower, insufficient
training for personnel, and inappropriate marketing
techniques.
All these shortcomings have not harmed only the
exporting sector, although hard currency is essential for the
Iranian economy. The Iranian consumer is directly affected,
too. According to "Hamshahri" daily on 6 January, there is an
increasing number of second-hand clothing stores selling
goods from abroad. Until recently, only the most destitute
would have used these stores, but they are now attracting a
wider cross-section of society. And they also serve as
unwelcome competition for domestic manufacturers. (Bill
Samii)


GET YOUR STORIES STRAIGHT
Officials and publications in Iran and its neighbors
have, at different times in March, condemned RFE/RL, cited
RFE/RL, and accused it of various malfeasances. The only
consistent factor in these statements is their inconsistency.
At the 26 March Friday sermon in Tehran, hardline Judiciary
chief Ayatollah Mohammad Yazdi complained that "a few writers
repeat the words - as some of you may have heard, read, or
seen - of the enemy, ... Free Radio [RFE/RL]. They say that
people are tired of the revolution. Who is tired of the
revolution? They say that the people are not in line with the
officials. Where in the world can you find officials so dear,
holy, and so much respected in society?"
The ultraconservative monthly "Yalisarat Al-Hussein"
reported recently that the Ministry of Islamic Culture and
Guidance had issued a notice that RFE/RL should not be cited
without additional cautionary commentary. Despite that, the
Islamic Republic News Agency quoted RFE/RL news about the
arrest of Islamic intellectual Hojatoleslam Mohsen Kadivar.
"Keyhan" made the same complaint earlier in March. (see
"RFE/RL Iran Report, 15 March 1999)
But Baku's "Khalq Gazeti" newspaper commented that
RFE/RL is promoting Iranian interests. According to a 25
March article, the Azeri Service of RFE/RL is "trying to make
it even easier for Iranian and Russian oil companies in the
Caspian." Yet a few weeks earlier, "Tehran Times" said
RFE/RL's Azeri service was anti-Iranian because it said food
exported to Azerbaijan is taxed while food exported to
Armenia is not. (Bill Samii)

*************************************************
Copyright (c) 1999. RFE/RL, Inc. All rights reserved.

The RFE/RL Iran Report is a weekly prepared by A. William
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_____________________________________________________________
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------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Apr 1999 22:28:46 EDT
From: Bobby Iri <Bobby@WWW.DCI.CO.IR>
Subject: Iran Deal Defies US Sanctions

Iran Deal Defies US Sanctions
=============================

BBC World: Middle East
Monday, April 5, 1999 Published at 03:54 GMT 04:54 UK


By the BBC's Martin Lumb
Two oil companies, Elf Aquitane of France and Bow Valley of
Canada, have signed a contract with Iran to exploit another big
oil deposit in the Gulf.

The deal has been completed in defiance of American legislation
which threatens sanctions against international companies
investing in countries like Iran, which are perceived by the
White House as supporters of terrorism.

The deal signed in Teheran to exploit the offshore site of Balal
follows close businesslike co-operation between Iran, France and
Canada.

It is worth $300m and forsees an operation lasting up to six
years. All three partners have shown a complete disregard for
the Sanctions Act, introduced to try to scare off potential
investors in Iran's rich oil and gas fields.

'US can bid for future projects'

A French Foreign Ministry spokesman said simply that France did
not recognise any global reach of American legislation; the
Canadian company said it had the full support of the Canadian
Government, while the latest word from Iran - perhaps a lttle
mischeviously - was that American companies were free to bid for
future projects.

This latest victory in Iran's campaign to show up the impotence
of the American legislation follows a similar deal with Elf and
the Italian company Agip last month.

All the Americans could do on that occasion was to express
concern and disappointment - cold comfort for their increasingly
frustrated oil companies watching lucrative contracts pass them
by.

Sanctions legislation is currently being reconsidered by
Congress, and the latest lost contract will be welcome
ammunition for those who argue strongly that it is bad for
business, and therefore bad for America.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Apr 1999 22:28:52 EDT
From: Bobby Iri <Bobby@WWW.DCI.CO.IR>
Subject: Deal to Develop Iranian Oil Field

Deal to Develop Iranian Oil Field
=================================


Monday, April 5, 1999; 11:51 a.m. EDT

PARIS (AP) -- A consortium made up of Canada's Bow Valley Energy
Ltd. and Elf Petroleum Iran has agreed to develop Iran's
offshore Balal oil field.

The cost of the project is estimated at $300 million, and the
first oil from Balal -- some 40,000 barrels a day -- is expected
in 2001.

Balal is 60 miles southwest of Lavan Island in the Persian Gulf.
Reserves there are estimated at 100 million barrels of ``good
quality oil,'' France's Elf Aquitaine said in a statement
Sunday.

Elf Petroleum Iran is a subsidiary of Paris-based Elf Aquitaine.

The consortium is to be reimbursed and paid in crude oil in the
six-year contract with Iran's national oil company, the
statement said.




© Copyright 1999 The Associated Press

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Apr 1999 22:29:12 EDT
From: Bobby Iri <Bobby@WWW.DCI.CO.IR>
Subject: Lockerbie Suspects Arrive in Netherlands for Trial

Lockerbie Suspects Arrive in Netherlands for Trial
==================================================


CNN
April 5, 1999
Web posted at: 7:30 a.m. EST (1230 GMT)

----------------------------------------------------------------
In this story:

Trial could take months

Investigators believe suitcase carried bomb

RELATED STORIES, SITES

----------------------------------------------------------------


AMSTERDAM, Netherlands (CNN) -- More than a decade after a bomb
brought down a Pan Am jetliner over Scotland, two Libyans
accused of blowing up the plane arrived in the Netherlands on
Monday to stand trial for the bombing.

Libya handed over the accused -- Abdel Basset Ali al-Megrahi and
Lamen Khalifa Fhimah -- to U.N. representatives on Monday in
Tripoli. The move ended a 10-year manhunt and paved the way for
the lifting of U.N. sanctions against Libya.

The two men will be tried by a British court in the Netherlands
for the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, which
killed all 259 aboard the jetliner. Another 11 died on the
ground when the plane's shattered hulk plunged to earth.

Both of the suspects have declared their innocence, and Libya
denies any involvement.

The Dutch Justice Ministry will hold a news conference at 1300
GMT (9 a.m. EST) Monday in connection with the extradition.

Once the men are in the Netherlands, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi
Annan is expected to write a letter to the Security Council that
would suspend sanctions imposed on Libya in 1992 and tightened
in 1993. The council can vote to lift them 90 days later.


Trial could take months

The trial of the accused is likely to drag on for months and
will be preceded by extradition proceedings between Britain and
the Netherlands.

The suspects will be held in Rotterdam until formally extradited
to a temporary detention unit at Camp Zeist, a former U.S. air
base near Utrecht. The camp will serve as British territory for
the trial. The extradition proceedings could be over in minutes
or could take months, officials said.

In the Netherlands, preparations continued Monday for the
long-awaited trial.

A temporary detention unit at Camp Zeist is ready for the
suspects, Scottish officials said.

Sheriff Graham Cox, the regional judge who will oversee
pre-trial proceedings, was expected to arrive in the Netherlands
on Monday. Scottish prosecutors Norman McFadyen and Jim Brisbane
were already there.


Investigators believe suitcase carried bomb

The United States and Britain accuse al-Megrahi, 47, and Fhimah,
43, of planting a bomb in a suitcase aboard the 747.

The jetliner blew up on December 21 at 31,000 feet over
Lockerbie during a flight from London to New York. Most of the
dead were Americans.

Last August, Britain and the United States dropped their
insistence on a trial in either of their countries and agreed to
a venue in a neutral, third country.

More than 100 Scottish policemen and court officials plus scores
of media representatives have descended on the Camp Zeist. Some
area residents told CNN they were worried about personal safety
because of the impending trial, but others said they were not
concerned.

Reuters contributed to this report.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Apr 1999 22:29:00 EDT
From: Bobby Iri <Bobby@WWW.DCI.CO.IR>
Subject: Iranian-Americans: Who Are We Becoming?

Iranian-Americans: Who Are We Becoming?
=======================================


The Iranian-American Cultural Association (IACA) of the
Washington, DC area will sponsor a conference entitled
"Iranian-Americans: Who Are We Becoming?," to be held at
Georgetown University on Saturday, 17 April 1999, 2:00-6:00 pm.
You may purchase tickets in advance until 6:00 pm on Thursday,
15 April 1999:

* Non-members, $15.00 conference, $20.00 with reception.
* Members, $10.00 conference, $15.00 with reception.
* Students (with valid ID card), $5.00 conference, $10.00 with
reception.

Since the revolution of 1978-79, Iranians have migrated in
unprecedented numbers to the United States, yet few
practitioners and scholars have analyzed this phenomenon. This
dialogue -- one of the first of its kind in the country -- will
feature experts from various disciplines who shall examine how
Iranians living in the United States are constructing their
identity and adapting to the experience of immigration.
Significantly, this dialogue will engage not only the experts
but also members of the Iranian(-American) community who are
invited to address such questions as: How do Iranians living in
the US perceive their identity? How do they raise their children
in a new and unfamiliar culture? How do they and their children
fare professionally and socio-economically? How do Iranians
contribute to American society? In short, are Iranians in the US
becoming "Iranian-Americans" -- a community of immigrants
integrating into mainstream American life?

A non-profit organization founded in 1993 and disavowing
political activities, the IACA provides a uniquely constructive
forum for raising these concerns. The IACA's sponsorship of this
dialogue is in keeping with its efforts to celebrate Iranian
culture in the US. Indeed, this meeting will illumuniate the
experiences of Iranian immigrants as relative newcomers and
contributors to this multi-cultural society. The IACA shall host
a reception after the dialogue, offering those in attendance the
opportunity to meet the speakers.

For further information, contact: 301-656-IACA or conference
coordinator at HVaziri@aol.com.


Please send any questions or comments to Webmaster
© Copyright 1998 Iranian American Cultural Association.
All rights reserved. WebWeaving by InfoStreet, Inc.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Apr 1999 22:29:26 EDT
From: Bobby Iri <Bobby@WWW.DCI.CO.IR>
Subject: Lockerbie Skeptical Ahead Of Suspects' Trial

Lockerbie Skeptical Ahead Of Suspects' Trial
============================================


08:25 a.m. Apr 05, 1999 Eastern
By David Luhnow
LOCKERBIE, Scotland (Reuters) - Lockerbie residents harbor
little hope that the handover Monday of two Libyans accused of
bombing a U.S. airliner over their town in 1988 will deliver the
two things they want most -- justice and obscurity.

Almost no one in Lockerbie believes the suspects' upcoming trial
in the Netherlands will answer such basic questions as ''who''
or ``why'' that still haunt this sleepy Scottish community more
than 10 years after one of the world's worst air disasters
claimed 270 lives -- 259 aboard the Pan Am Boeing 747 and 11 on
the ground -- and etched Lockerbie's name forever into history.

Lockerbie's 3,500 inhabitants also fear the trial will again
shine an uncomfortable spotlight on them when all they want to
do is to forget the horror of December 21, 1988, and move on.

``We felt as if after 10 years, people were starting to forget,
but now the trial's going to dig it all up again,'' hotel
manager Sheila Tindal told Reuters.

Many could not care less about the trial, weary after a decade
of unanswered questions while playing gracious host to grieving
relatives, visiting politicians, curious tourists and occasional
hordes of media personnel who invade their town.

``A tidal wave of apathy,'' was how one patron described the
feeling at a local pub upon learning of the handover.

``Most people want to put it at the back of their minds, they
are sick of it,'' bar manager Duncan Crossar, 30, explained.

Some residents admit they will watch the proceedings -- albeit
with a healthy dose of cynicism.

``We have not got our hopes too high. It may have more to do
with the murky waters of geopolitics than justice,'' said David
Wilson, a schoolteacher.

Nearly everyone doubts the two former intelligence agents
accused by the United States and British governments of planting
a bomb on the ill-fated Pan American World Airways airliner --
Abdel Basset Ali Mohammed al-Megrahi and Lamen Khalifa Fhimah --
acted alone.

``I'm glad there will be a trial for the (sake of the) families.
But these two guys are pawns, the fall guys. There are much
bigger players behind this,'' said Gordon Smith, a retired local
official.

``I don't think we'll ever know who was behind it,'' he added.

Many believe the real culprit was Iran, which six months before
the attack vowed revenge for the accidental shooting down of an
Iranian Airbus by the American navy cruiser USS Vincennes.

Beneath its cynical shell, Lockerbie cannot forget the
unimaginable horrors of the wintry night just before Christmas
when flaming wreckage and mangled bodies rained down from 31,000
feet (9,500 meters) in the sky.

Hotel managers Norman and Sheila Tindal used to lie to strangers
when asked where they were from in years after the disaster to
avoid the questions that inevitably followed.

``If it had been a natural disaster, it would have been
forgotten by now. With this, it never goes away,'' she said.

Many here suffer from nightmares when significant dates come
round -- especially the recent 10th anniversary that reopened
old wounds for some.

``A lot of people said the 10th anniversary was their chance to
draw a line and move on. We want to do that, we want to be left
alone,'' said Donald Bogey, a town official who helped set up
makeshift mortuaries after the crash.

Most in Lockerbie welcome a trial only for the sake of the
mainly American families, many of whom made lifelong friends in
a town that shared in their grief.

But as Tindal said: ``The trial's fine. It doesn't bring the
people back, though, does it?''


Copyright 1999 Reuters Limited.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 5 Apr 1999 22:30:38 EDT
From: Bobby Iri <Bobby@WWW.DCI.CO.IR>
Subject: Wrestling Results

Wrestling Results
=================


Saturday, April 3
SPOKANE, Wash. - Results Saturday from the second and final day
of the World Cup of Freestyle Wrestling:

Final Team Standings
1. United States, 4-0 record, 8 pts. 2. Iran, 3-1, 6. 3. Cuba,
2-2, 4. Germany, 1-3, 2. 5. Canada, 0-4, 0.

Session Four
United States 20, Iran 12
119 - Gholam Reza Mohammadi, Iran, won by tech. fall over Sam
Henson, Norman, Okla., 10-0, 2:48.
127 3/4 - Ali Rexa Dabier, Iran, dec. Tony Purler, Clarion, Pa.,
6-5.
138 3/4 - Cary Kolat, Bellefonte, Pa., won by tech. fall over
Mehdi Baraati, Iran, 11-0, 2:59.
152 - Lincoln McIlravy, Iowa City, Iowa, dec. Amir Tavakolian,
Iran, 5-3.
167 1/2 - Steve Marianetti, Urbana, Ill., won by ref. decision
over Pejiman Dorostkar, Iran, 2-1, OT, 9:00.
187 1/4 - Les Gutches, Corvallis, Ore., dec. Ferydon Ghanbari,
Iran, 3-0.
213 3/4 - Ali Reza Heidari, Iran, dec. J.J. McGrew, Stillwater,
Okla., 6-1.
286 - Kerry McCoy, State College, Pa., pin Ebrahim Mehraban,
Iran, 1:03.

Cuba 19, Germany 11
119 - Wilfredo Garcia, Cuba, dec. Vasili Zeiher, Germany, 3-2.
127 3/4 - Yoel Garcia, Cuba, dec. Othmar Kuhner, 3-1, OT, 7:12.
138 3/4 - Carlos Ortiz, Cuba, dec. Jurgen Scheibe, Germany, 6-0.
152 - Yosvany Sanchez, Cuba, dec. Jens Gundling, Germany, 5-0.
167 1/2 - Alexander Leipold, Germany, pin Walter Torrientes,
Cuba, 2:52.
187 1/4 - Yoel Romero, Cuba, dec. Hans Gstottner, Germany, 7-2.
213 3/4 - Heiko Balz, Germany, dec. Wilfredo Morales, Cuba, 9-1.
286 - Alexis Rodriguez, Cuba, dec. Sven Thiele, Germany, 4-0.
Session Three
United States 29, Canada 3
119 pounds - Sam Henson, Norman, Okla., won by tech. fall over
Paul Ragusa, Canada, 11-0, 2:54.
127 3/4 - Tony Purler, Clarion, Pa., won by tech. fall over
Dennis Pagliniwan, Canada, 12-0, 4:08.
138 3/4 - Kerry Boumands, Colorado Springs, Colo., dec. Jeremy
Podlog, Canada, 9-2.
152 - Lincoln McIlravy, Iowa City, Iowa, dec. Daniel Igali,
Canada, 3-2, OT, 6:41.
167 1/2 - Steve Marianetti, Urbana, Ill., pin George Orbi,
Canada, 5:51.
187 1/4 - Les Gutches, Corvallis, Ore., won by inj. dft. over
Justin Abdou, Canada, 1:48.
213 3/4 - J.J. McGrew, Stillwater, Okla., dec. Dean Schmeichel,
Canada, 4-0.
286 - Kerry McCoy, State College, Pa., dec. Wayne Weathers,
Canada, 7-1.

Iran 22, Cuba 7
119 - Gholam Reza Mohammadi, Iran, pin Wilfredo Garcia, Cuba,
4:26.
127 3/4 - Ali Reza Dabier, Iran, dec. Yoel Garcia, Cuba, 5-0.
138 3/4 - Mehdi Baraati, Iran, dec. Carlos Ortiz, Cuba, 3-2.
152 - Amir Tavakolian, Iran, dec. Yosvany Sanchez, Cuba, 3-2,
OT, 6:55.
167 1/2 - Pejman Dorostkar, Iran, dec. over Walter Torrientes,
Cuba, 3-0.
187 1/4 - Ferydon Ghanbari, Iran, and Yoel Romero, Cuba, double
disqualification at 6:00.
213 3/4 - Ali Reza Heidari, Iran, pin Wilfredo Morales, Cuba,
2:35.
286 - Alexis Rodriguez, Cuba, pin Ebrahim Mehraban, Iran, 5:27.

Germany 27, Canada 6
119 pounds - Vasili Zeiher, Germany, dec. Paul Ragusa, Canada,
4-0.
127 3/4 - Othmar Kuhner, Germany, pin Dennis Pagliniwan, Canada,
4:33.
138 3/4 - Jurgen Scheibe, Germany, dec. Jeremy Podlog, Canada,
10-2.
152 - Daniel Igali, Canada, won by tech. fall over Jens
Gundling, Germany, 10-0, 3:09.
167 1/2 - Alexander Leipold, Germany, dec. Nick Ugoalah, Canada,
4-0.
187 1/4 - Hans Gstottner, Germany, pin George Orbi, Canada,
2:11.
213 3/4 - Heiko Balz, Germany, pin Dean Schmeichel, Canada,
1:36.
286 - Sven Thiele, Germany, dec. Wayne Weathers, Canada, 7-1.

----------------------------------------------------------------
----------------

Friday, April 2
Session One
United Sta
20, Germany 9
20, Germany 9
20, Germany 9
20, Germany 9
20, Germany 9
119 pounds - Sam Henson, Norman, Okla., won by tech. fall over
Vasili Zeiher, Germany, 10-0,4:37.
127 3/4 - Tony Purler, Clarion, Pa., dec. Othmar Kuhner,
Germany, 8-4.
138 3/4 - Cary Kolat, Bellefonte, Pa., dec. Jurgen Scheibe,
Germany, 6-3.
153 - Lincoln McIlravy, Iowa City, Iowa, won by tech. fall over
Jens Gundling, Germany, 10-0, 2:33.
167 1/2 - Alexander Leipold, Germany, dec. Steve Marianetti,
Urbana, Ill., 3-0.
187 1/4 - Les Gutches, Corvallis, Ore., dec. Hans Gstottner,
Germany, 3-0, ot, 6:39.
213 3/4 - Heiko Balz, Germany, dec. J.J. McGrew, Stillwater,
Okla., 8-0.
286 - Kerry Mc286 - Kerry McCoy, State College, Pa., dec. Sven Thiele,
Germany, 3-1, ot, 6:45.

Iran 22, Canada 7
119 - Gholam Reza Mohammadi, Iran, dec. Selwyn Tam, Canada, 7-0.
127 3/4 - Ali Reza Dabier, Iran, won by tech. fall over Dennis
Pagliniwan, Canada, 11-0, 2:45.
138 3/4 - Mehdi Baraati, Iran, dec. Jeremy Podlog, Canada, 4-0.
153 - Daniel Igali, Canada, dec. Ali Akhbar Nejad, Iran, 5-2.
167 1/2 - Pejman Dorostkar, Iran, won by ref. dec. over Nick
Ugoalah, Canada, 2-0, ot, 9:00.
187 1/4 - Ferydon Ghanbari, Iran, dec. Justin Abdou, Canada,
7-1.
213 3/4 - Ali Reza Heidari, Iran, won by tech. fall over Dean
Schmeichel, Canada, 10-0, 4:20.
286 - Wayne Weathers, Canada, dec. Ebrahim Mehraban, Iran, 4-1.

Session Two
Iran 19, Germany 11
119 - Gholam Reza Mohammadi, Iran, dec. Vasili Zeiher, Germany,
8-1.
127 3/4 - Ali Reza Dabier, Iran, dec. Othmar Kuhner, Germany,
7-0.
138 3/4 - Mehdi Baraati, Iran, dec. Jurgen Scheibe, Germany,
3-2.
153 - Amir Tavakolian, Iran, dec. Jens Gundling, Germany, 6-1.
167 1/2 - Alexander Leipold, Germany, dec. Pejman Dorostkar,
Iran, 3-1.
187 1/4 - Ferydon Ghanbari, Iran, dec. Andre Backha
us, Germany,
6-5.
213 3/4 - Ali Reza Heidari, Iran, dec. Arawat Sabejew, Germany,
5-3, ot, 7:27.
286 - Sven Thiele, Germany, won by ref. dec. over Ebrahim
Mehraban, Iran, 1-0, ot, 9:00.

Cuba 22, Canada 4
119 - Wilfredo Garcia, Cuba, dec. Selwyn Tam, Canada, 3-0.
127 3/4 - Yoel Garcia, Cuba, dec. Dennis Pagliniwan, Canada,
4-0.
138 3/4 - Carlos Ortiz, Cuba, dec. Jeremy Podlog, Canada, 7-0.
153 - Daniel Igali, Canada, dec. Yosvany Sanchez, Cuba, 6-5, ot,
6:23.
167 1/2 - Walter Torrientes, Cuba, dec. Nick Ugoalah, Canada,
3-2.
187 1/4 - Yoel Romero, Cuba, dec. Justin Abdou, Canada, 3-0.
213 3/4 - Wilfredo Morales, Cuba, dec. Dean Schmeichel, Canada,
6-0.
286 - Alexis Rodriguez, Cuba, dec. Wayne Weathers, Canada, 4-0.

United States 20, Cuba 9
119 - Sammie Henson, Norman, Okla., dec. Wilfredo Garcia, Cuba,
3-1.
127 3/4 - Tony Purler, Clarion, Pa., dec. Yoel Garcia, Cuba,
6-4, ot, 6:29.
138 3/4 - Cary
138 3/4 - Cary Kolat, Bellefonte, Pa., dec. Carlos Ortiz, Cuba,
3-0.
153 - Lincoln McIlravy, Iowa City, Iowa, won by inj. dft. over
Yosvany Sanchez, Cuba, 2:34.
167 1/2 - Steve Marianetti, Urbana, Ill., won by ref. dec. over
Walter Torrientes, Cuba, 2-0, ot, 9:00.
187 1/4 - Yoel Romero, Cuba, dec. Les Gutches, Corvallis, Ore.,
3-0, ot, 7:40.
213 3/4 - Wilfredo Morales, Cuba, dec. J.J. McGrew, Stillwater,
Okla., 3-2.
286 - Kerry McCoy, State College, Pa., dec. Alexis Rodriguez,
Cuba, 3-1.



© Copyright 1999 USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Co. Inc.

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End of DNI-NEWS Digest - 4 Apr 1999 to 5 Apr 1999 - Special issue
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