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There are 9 messages totalling 614 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Iran/IRNA: Majlis speaker warns against mischievous acts of munafiqeen
2. Iran/BBC: Iran rejects 'spies' outcry
3. Iran/Xinhua: Iran Has 3.2 Million Drug Addicts
4. Iran/Reuters: Iranian News Papers Leading Stories
5. Iran/IRNA: Non obesrvance of Sharia by judiciary's not acceptable
6. Iran/Xinhua: Conservative Daily Calls for Iran's Withdrawal
7. Turkey/Amnesty Int.: Calls for a retrial of PKK leader Abdullah Ícalan
8. Iran/AP: U.S. Missile Defense System Sought
9. Iran/AP: GOP, Democrats Agree on Defense

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Tue, 29 Jun 1999 20:42:14 -0500
From: "Aryo B. Pirouznia" <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: Iran/IRNA: Majlis speaker warns against mischievous acts of munafiqeen

thr 016
speaker-munafiqeen

majlis speaker warns against mischievous acts of munafiqeen

tehran, june 29, irna -- majlis speaker ali akbar nateq nouri
here monday warned against continuation of mischievous acts by
munafiqeen (hypocrites), a term used for the terrorist mujahideen
khalq organization.
the speaker made the remark at a ceremony held in
commemoration of martyrs of june 28, 1981 terrorist bomb blast at the
headquarters of the islamic republic party in which the then chief
justice of the supreme court ayatollah mohammad hussein beheshti and
72 other iranian officials were martyred.
nateq nouri added that the trend of hypocrisy has not ended
yet and enmity against this revolution will continue as long islam,
independence of the country and velayat-e faqih are given top
priority.
he pointed out that disrespect for the clergy and creating crisis
and discord inside the society are part of measures taken by the
munafiqeen to overthrow the revolution.
stressing that the enemies have not yet given up their
efforts aimed at weakening the revolution, he said, ''at present the
country is in a state of war and since they have failed to strike
blows on the revolution in the military front, the enemies have
waged a cultural war.''
terming cultural war as dangerous, he said, ''in military wars
borders are attacked while in cultural war brains, genuine values
and religious beliefs of the people are targeted.''
a number of majlis deputies, members of the cabinet, senior
clerics, families of the martyrs of june 28 blast and people of
various walks of life were present in the ceremony.
ys/ks
end
::irna 29/06/99 11:14

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 29 Jun 1999 20:43:21 -0500
From: "Aryo B. Pirouznia" <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: Iran/BBC: Iran rejects 'spies' outcry

Tuesday, June 29, 1999 Published at 01:42 GMT 02:42 UK


World: Middle East

Iran rejects 'spies' outcry

Israel's Prime Minister-designate Ehud Barak rejected the spying allegations

The Iranian Government has brushed aside international condemnation over the
arrest of 13 Iranian Jews on spying charges, saying they will get a fair
trial.
The Iranian Foreign Minister, Kamal Kharazzi, was responding to a number of
international bodies and foreign governments. He said that those accused had
only been charged and not convicted.

"The request to release the individuals is not acceptable and constitutes an
insult to the sovereignty of the government of the Islamic Republic of the
Iran in its legitimate efforts to deal effectively with threats to the
security of the country and the nation," he said.



Iran's liberal president is locked in battle with the conservative judiciary
The comments come a day after President Mohammed Khatami appealed to the
country's judiciary to respect the rights of people on trial.

Many observers see Mr Kharazzi's intervention as an attempt by Mr Khatami's
reformist government to distance itself from views expressed by many
conservatives, including the head of Iran's judiciary, who have said the 13
are guilty, although they have yet to be tried.

The detained have been accused of spying for Israel and the United States.
If convicted, they could be hanged.

US, German and Israeli officials have called for their release, saying they
are rabbis and religious teachers.

Press freedom concern

The Iranian Government has also expressed concern about a parliamentary bill
aimed at modifying the country's press laws, saying it would further
restrict the freedom of the press.

A presidential statement said although the press law needed alteration, any
attempt to move in the direction of the proposed bill would be wrong.

Iran's conservative-dominated parliament is due to debate the bill in the
next few days.

The full text has not been released but some pro-government newspapers say
it will introduce more controls over the press and journalists.

Correspondents say Iran's moderate press has enjoyed considerable freedom
since the election of Mr Khatami but has come under increasing pressure from
conservatives in recent months.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 29 Jun 1999 20:45:14 -0500
From: "Aryo B. Pirouznia" <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: Iran/Xinhua: Iran Has 3.2 Million Drug Addicts

Iran Has 3.2 Million Drug Addicts
June 29, 1999

Xinhua via NewsEdge Corporation :

TEHRAN (June 28) XINHUA - Despite Iran's
large-scale campaign against drug trafficking, there are 3.2 million drug
addicts throughout the country, a medical official has said.

Dr. Bahram Yeganeh, secretary of the national committee to fight against
AIDS, made the remarks at a seminar on AIDS and narcotics in Ardabil in the
northwestern Ardabil province, local daily Iran reported Monday.

He said that some 2,000 tons of various narcotics are consumed in Iran every
year, but the country's anti-drug forces can only confiscate an average of
155 tons annually.

According to the figures announced by the United Nations, drug smugglers in
Iran can fetch 1.6 billion U.S. dollars every year, he said.

However, another daily Khordad reported, secretary of the anti-drug
headquarters at the Iranian Presidential Office, Mohammad Fallah, rejected
Yeganeh's remarks, putting the number of Iranian drug addicts at 1.2
million.

Fallah also denied that some 2,000 tons of drugs are consumed in Iran,
adding that about 2,160 tons of drugs are produced in Afghanistan according
to U.N. reports.

Iran Saturday burned 55 tons of drugs in Tehran to show its determination to
fight against drug trafficking while calling for international cooperation
to uproot drug production.

The country started large-scale anti-drug campaigns in 1989, but local press
said the number of addicts in the country is still increasing.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 29 Jun 1999 20:46:42 -0500
From: "Aryo B. Pirouznia" <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: Iran/Reuters: Iranian News Papers Leading Stories

PRESS DIGEST - Iran - June 29
08:57 a.m. Jun 29, 1999 Eastern

TEHRAN, June 29 (Reuters) - These are some of the leading stories in Iranian
newspapers on Tuesday. Reuters has not verified these stories and does not
vouch for their accuracy.

TEHRAN TIMES

- A visiting British business delegation carried proposals on the
participation of British firms in Iranian oil projects, Deputy Oil Minister
Mehdi Husseini said. The delegation, the largest to visit Iran since the
1979 revolution, comprises representatives of 29 companies.

- Ruhollah Hosseinian, the conservative head of a state archives centre,
defended his decision to attend a memorial for Saeed Emami, a top security
official who was a key suspect in last year's killings of dissidents and who
reportedly committed suicide in prison recently. Hosseinian said he had
humaniatarian reasons to attend.

HAMSHAHRI

- A top state economic body has authorised banks to exchange their hard
currency income at the floating rate set on the Tehran Stock Exchange, said
Mojtaba Khosrowtaj, head of the state Export Promotion Centre. Up to now
exporters had been only allowed to sell their hard cash directly to
importers at the more advantageous floating rate. The floating rate was
8,160 rials to the U.S. dollar on Monday, compared to 8,940 rials to the
dollar on the black market. The main official exchange rate is 3,000 rials
to the dollar.

ARYA

- Some 8,000 people are HIV-positive in Iran, while some 200 have died of
AIDS so far, an official at the state anti-AIDS headquarters said.

KHORDAD

- More than 3,400 hectares (8,400 acres) of rice fields in the northern
province of Gilan have been destroyed by the current drought, an
agricultural official said.


((Tehran newsroom +9821 2294856, +9821 228 9917))


Copyright 1999 Reuters Limited. All rights reserved. Republication and
redistribution of Reuters content is expressly prohibited without the prior
written consent of Reuters. Reuters shall not be liable for any errors or
delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 29 Jun 1999 20:47:26 -0500
From: "Aryo B. Pirouznia" <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: Iran/IRNA: Non obesrvance of Sharia by judiciary's not acceptable

thr 033 leader-judiciary

leader: people's confidence in judiciary indicates successful
justice system

Tehran, june 28, irna

leader of the islamic revolution ayatollah seyed ali khamenei said on monday
the confidence the people have placed in the judiciary indicated the extent
the justice system has succeeded in carrying out its duties.

The leader's meeting with judicial officials coincided with the
judiciary day, which marks the day on which the then iranian chief justice
ayatollah mohammad beheshti along with about 70 ranking officials were
martyred in a bomb blast at the headquarters of the islamic republic party
(irp) in 1981.

The leader honored the memory of ayatollah beheshti and the
martyrs of the 7th of tir and that of then president mohammad ali rajaei and
prime minister mohammad javad bahonar who were martyred in another bomb
blast on august 30, 1981.

On the conflict between the supporters of the islamic revolution
and the counterrevolutionaries, the leader said those opposing the divine
sovereignty of iran were lobbying against interference of religious leaders
in social affairs, because they well knew that establishment of a government
on the basis of islam and the islamic teachings would make the interference
of arrogant and foreign powers in iran impossible.

The supreme leader said the islamic and quranic teachings do not allow the
arrogant and alien powers to interfere in the country, instead, it is
capable of mobilizing the people to stand against the enemy. This is
separate from the partisan and political attitude.

The leader said in the early days of the islamic revolution, the
late imam khomeini and the revolutionary people who had logic strongly stood
against the hue and cry of the opposition currents.

"in the confrontation any individual who resisted the
counterrevolutionaries was subject to various kinds of conspiracy. at last,
they (counterrevolutionary forces) resorted to terrorism. Therefore, what
is important today is that the insiders should be aware of the enemy's plots
and the goals it is pursuing," the leader said.

The leader said every individual in the county should have
the feeling that the judiciary is working to protect their rights and
bring to justice those who tramples upon the people's rights.

The leader said the judiciary is working on the basis of sharia
law and any part of the judiciary which does no observe the islamic codes is
not acceptable.

Prior to the leader's speech, head of the judiciary ayatollah
mohammad yazdi gave a report on the performance of the judiciary and head of
the headquarters in charge of commemoration of martyrs of 7th of tir
hojatoleslam ferdowsi-pour outlined the programs to be implemented on the
occasion.

ss/rr End
::irna 28/06/99 17:00

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 29 Jun 1999 20:55:18 -0500
From: "Aryo B. Pirouznia" <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: Iran/Xinhua: Conservative Daily Calls for Iran's Withdrawal

Conservative Daily Calls for Iran's Withdrawal
June 28, 1999

Xinhua via NewsEdge Corporation : from World Bank

TEHRAN (June 26) XINHUA - An Iranian conservative daily on Saturday called
on the country to withdraw from the World Bank after the bank refused to
grant a 200-million-U.S.-dollar loan to Tehran.

Blasting the World Bank decision, Tehran Times said in an article that
Islamic countries should withdraw their funds from the World Bank and invest
them in the Jeddah-based Islamic Bank.

The World Bank recently rejected to provide the loan to two Iranian
development projects in a protest to the arrest of 13 Iranian Jews on
espionage charges.

The United States, Israel and some European countries have expressed concern
over the issue after Iran confirmed the arrest of Iranian Jews for spying
for the U.S. and Israel.

Terming the arrest as politically motivated, both the U.S. and Israel denied
any links between their intelligence services and the Iranian Jews, and
called for their immediate release.

Tehran Times, which is believed to be close to the powerful conservatives
who dominate the country's main state organs, underlined that the World Bank
should "make their decision free from political influence of the arrogant
powers."

The daily said the World Bank move indicates that the arrogant powers are
not only opposed to the Islamic Republic of Iran, but are also against the
welfare and development of the Iranian nation.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 29 Jun 1999 20:51:33 -0500
From: "Aryo B. Pirouznia" <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: Turkey/Amnesty Int.: Calls for a retrial of PKK leader Abdullah Ícalan

* News Release Issued by the International Secretariat of Amnesty
International *
News Service: 125/99
AI INDEX: EUR 44/43/99
29 June 1999

TURKEY

Amnesty International calls for a retrial of PKK leader Abdullah Ícalan

Amnesty International calls for a full retrial of Kurdistan Workers
Party (PKK) leader Abdullah Ícalan who was sentenced to death on 29 June
1999.

"Abdullah Ícalan should be retried before a competent, independent and
impartial tribunal and under conditions which ensure the strictest
compliance with fair trial guarantees enshrined in national and
international law," the human rights organization said, adding that, "he
was sentenced to death at the conclusion of a trial that violated both
national law and international standards for fair trials".

Amnesty International is deeply concerned that Turkey may resume
executions after a 15 years' de facto moratorium. The organization calls
on the Turkish authorities not to execute Abdullah Ícalan or any other
person under sentence of death and reiterates its appeal for total
abolition of the death penalty in Turkey. Amnesty International is
unconditionally opposed to the death penalty in all cases without
exception.

"Fair trial concerns begin from the moment of arrest and encompass the
preliminary investigation, the trial, all appeals and the imposition of
the sentence," Amnesty International said.

Violations of Abdullah Ícalan's right to a fair trial include:

Failure to allow prompt access to a judge: Abdullah Ícalan was brought
before a judge only on the seventh day after his arrest. The European
Court of Human Rights has ruled that detaining a person for four days
and six hours violates the right to be brought promtly before a judge.

Violations of the right to defend oneself in person or through legal
counsel:
-Failure to allow prompt access to a lawyer: Abdullah Ícalan's first
meeting with his lawyers did not take place until 10 days after his
arrest.

-Failure to allow adequate time to communicate with his counsel: the
meetings with his counsel were restricted to two hours a week at the
most throughout the investigation period and the trial.

-Violation of his right to confidential communication with his counsel:
during the meetings with his lawyers in the first two months, guards
were present and not only within sight, but also within hearing
distance.

-Failure to allow adequate time and facilities to prepare his defence
and failure to inform him promptly of the charges against him: his
lawyers received the written indictment two days after parts of it were
read out at a press conference and the indictment distributed to the
press. They were not allowed to bring any written or printed material to
the meetings with their client. The lawyers' request to adjourn the
trial to allow them more time to prepare the defence was rejected by the
court.

Failure to provide a full trial before a competent, independent and
impartial tribunal:
-Abduallh Ícalan was tried by a State Security Court (SSC).The fact that
a military judge made rulings in the Ícalan trial until it was adjourned
on 8 June for the preparation of the final defence undermines his right
to a full trial before a competent, independent and impartial tribunal.

-When the trial of Abdullah Ícalan continued on 23 June, the military
judge had been replaced by a civilian judge who had not actively
participated in the trial from the beginning. Amnesty International
believes that it is a fundamental principle of fairness that if there is
a change of judges, the trial should be repeated from the beginning.

-The substitute civilian judge had issued the arrest warrant against
which the defence lawyers appealed. Amnesty International, therefore,
believes that he should not have participated in the final decision.

Amnesty International considers that the conditions of detention in
which Abdullah Ícalan was held amounted to solitary confinement and as
such may have constituted cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment. In
violation of his right to be presumed innocent until convicted, he was
presented to the public as guilty from the very beginning. His lawyers
were repeatedly harassed and threatened both by government authorities
and by angry crowds being left without protection by the security
forces.

The last executions in Turkey took place in October 1984 and provoked an
international outcry. Hidir Aslan, aged 28, was executed on 25 October
1984 after being convicted of belonging to an illegal organization in
Izmir. He was however not convicted of killings.

Since then, death sentences have continued to be imposed. But there has
been a de facto moratorium on executions, as the Turkish parliament did
not vote on any death sentences brought before it for approval. Amnesty
International welcomes the moratorium.

"The death penalty is the ultimate form of cruel, inhuman and degrading
punishment. It has never been shown to prevent crime - least of all
politically-motivated crime - more effectively than other punishments,"
Amnesty International said.

Background
Turkey, a member of the Council of Europe and party to the European
Convention of Human Rights, is one of the few remaining European states
not to have abolished the death penalty. The resumption of executions in
Turkey would be a severe setback for total abolition in western Europe,
of which Turkey considers itself a part. It would be a bad example for
eastern European countries considering abolition, and a blow for human
rights in Turkey. Amnesty International urges the Turkish authorities to
realize previous plans to abolish the death penalty.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 29 Jun 1999 20:58:19 -0500
From: "Aryo B. Pirouznia" <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: Iran/AP: U.S. Missile Defense System Sought

U.S. Missile Defense System Sought
By Tom Raum
Associated Press Writer
Tuesday, June 29, 1999; 2:53 a.m. EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Revised estimates of nuclear missile capability,
particularly of North Korea and Iran, add new urgency to development of a
national missile defense system, the Clinton administration's top
arms-control official said.

``Cold war disciplines are gone. Technology is more widely available,'' John
Holum, acting undersecretary of state for arms control and international
security affairs, told a Senate confirmation hearing.

House Republican leaders were to rally on the steps of the Capitol today to
applaud President Clinton's signing of a GOP-sponsored bill committing the
United States to a national ballistic missile defense against limited
attack, as might be launched by a small nuclear power.

Since Congress passed that bill in May, two developments have occurred on
the missile-defense front:

--Russian President Boris Yeltsin agreed, for the first time, to consider
reopening the landmark 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile treaty to consider easing
that prohibition against either American or Russian nationwide ballistic
missile defense systems.

--After six straight failures, a $3.8 billion experimental missile defense
system scored its first hit in a test at the White Sands Missile Range in
New Mexico, shooting down an incoming test rocket.

Holum, in testimony Monday before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee,
voiced strong support for deploying a missile defense system.

He said a 1998 report by a panel headed by former Defense Secretary Donald
Rumsfeld had ``a profound impact'' on Clinton administration policy.

The Rumsfeld panel concluded that North Korea and Iran could develop
long-range missiles within five years and probably are secretly doing so.

Even if a missile defense is outlawed by the 1972 ABM treaty, national
interest dictates that the United States move ahead in planning for such a
system anyway, Holum said, echoing views of Republican members of the
committee.

The threat of a nuclear attack by a small power ``is clearly very
prominent'' as an area of concern, far more so than just a few years ago,
Holum said.

President Clinton vetoed an earlier bill committing the nation to a
missile-defense system. But in a compromise with congressional Republicans,
he agreed this year to support similar legislation, the bill he signed.

``In light of new estimates on the ballistic missile threat, in particular
from North Korea and Iran, national missile defense is now closer to
becoming another integral part of our strategy against proliferation,''
Holum testified.

Holum appeared at a nomination hearing to be the first person to serve in
the new post. He had served since 1993 as director of the Arms Control and
Disarmament Agency, but the agency went out of business on April 1 when its
functions were merged with the State Department.

The panel was expected to approve the nomination, perhaps as early as
Wednesday, when it also votes on the nomination of Richard Holbrooke to be
U.N. ambassador.

The administration says it will make decisions on details of a missile
defense system next June.

Rather than blindly follow the ABM restrictions, Holum said, ``I believe our
missile defense should be geared toward threat.''

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 29 Jun 1999 21:01:02 -0500
From: "Aryo B. Pirouznia" <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: Iran/AP: GOP, Democrats Agree on Defense

GOP, Democrats Agree on Defense
By Tom Raum
Associated Press Writer
Tuesday, June 29, 1999; 2:51 p.m. EDT

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Republicans and the Clinton administration found
themselves in rare agreement over a national ballistic-missile defense
today, with GOP leaders welcoming belated administration support for a
long-standing GOP priority.

``We usher in a new era of American security,'' House Speaker Dennis
Hastert, R-Ill., said at a Capitol-steps rally held to showcase a bill to
commit the United States to deployment of such a defense.

Although Democrats once belittled the project, begun by President Reagan in
the early 1980s, as ``Star Wars,'' Clinton and most congressional Democrats
did an about-face earlier this year -- partly in response to revised
estimates of nuclear missile capability, particularly on the part of North
Korea and Iran.

Hastert and other Republican leaders stood alongside a huge map suggesting
that a North Korean ballistic missile, similar to one tested last year,
could nearly reach Chicago.

``It might be aimed at Chicago and hit St. Louis, but surely they have that
capability,'' said Rep. Curt Weldon, R-Pa., long an outspoken supporter of a
national missile defense system.

Weldon likened the legislation to President Kennedy's 1960 pledge to put
Americans on the moon. And Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott, R-Miss.,
suggested the measure was one of the most significant bills to pass Congress
in recent years.

Lott called the current lack of a defense against incoming ballistic
missiles ``our Achilles' heel.''

The legislation commits the United States to deployment of a missile defense
against limited ballistic missile attack once it is technologically
possible.

Clinton, who vetoed similar legislation in the past, said he would sign it.
However, congressional leaders delayed sending it to him until after the
conflict in Kosovo died down.

The rally on the Capitol steps, under a broiling midday sun, came a day
after the administration's top arms-control official said the escalating
long-range missile capability of North Korea and Iran were partly
responsible for a change in the administration's attitude.

``Cold war disciplines are gone. Technology is more widely available,'' John
Holum, acting undersecretary of state for arms control and international
security affairs, told a Senate confirmation hearing.

Since Congress passed that bill in May, two developments have occurred on
the missile-defense front:

--Russian President Boris Yeltsin agreed, for the first time, to consider
reopening the landmark 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile treaty to consider easing
that prohibition against either American or Russian nationwide ballistic
missile defense systems.

--After six straight failures, a $3.8 billion experimental missile defense
system scored its first hit in a test at the White Sands Missile Range in
New Mexico, shooting down an incoming test rocket.

Holum, in testimony Monday before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee,
voiced strong support for deploying a missile defense system.

He said a 1998 report by a panel headed by former Defense Secretary Donald
Rumsfeld had ``a profound impact'' on Clinton administration policy.

The Rumsfeld panel concluded that North Korea and Iran could develop
long-range missiles within five years and probably are secretly doing so.

Even if a missile defense is outlawed by the 1972 ABM treaty, national
interest dictates that the United States move ahead in planning for such a
system anyway, Holum said, echoing views of Republican members of the
committee.

The threat of a nuclear attack by a small power ``is clearly very
prominent'' as an area of concern, far more so than just a few years ago,
Holum said.

``In light of new estimates on the ballistic missile threat, in particular
from North Korea and Iran, national missile defense is now closer to
becoming another integral part of our strategy against proliferation,''
Holum testified.

Holum appeared at a nomination hearing to be the first person to serve in
the new post. He had served since 1993 as director of the Arms Control and
Disarmament Agency, but the agency went out of business on April 1 when its
functions were merged with the State Department.

The panel was expected to approve the nomination, perhaps as early as
Wednesday, when it also votes on the nomination of Richard Holbrooke to be
U.N. ambassador.

------------------------------

End of DNI-NEWS Digest - 28 Jun 1999 to 29 Jun 1999
***************************************************