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Subject: DNI-NEWS Digest - 15 Jul 1999

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There are 4 messages totalling 403 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Fwd: Eyewitness Account from Tehran (5)
2. Iran/Reuters: Iran conservatives hold most levers of power
3. Iran/Reuters: Tehran calm as officials reclaim control
4. Fwd: Iranian leftists claim bloodshed part of coup bid against Khatami

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Date: Thu, 15 Jul 1999 16:51:49 EDT
From: KPGBT@AOL.COM
Subject: Fwd: Eyewitness Account from Tehran (5)

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Date: Thu, 15 Jul 1999 09:52:33 -0700 (PDT)
From: Payman Arabshahi <payman@neda.com>
To: iran-news@arash.neda.com
Subject: Eyewitness Account from Tehran (5)
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Date: Wed Jul 14 12:31:49 PDT 1999

Yesterday I talked to my brother (who is a student at Tehran Univ), just
to see what he had to say. He's not the type that gets involved, but he
had a couple of interesting things:

- A Pakistani friend of his (a guy named Navid) was beaten up in the
foreign student dorms. He came to my friend's house very early on Friday
morning to take refuge. He was horrified! His cash was stolen (about
50,000 tomans) but fortunately the "beaters" didn't find his dollars. He
was saying: "AqA inA Adam nistand! inA farhang nadArand! bA dAneSju in
raftAr nabAyad kard! man raftam az panjare birun rA negAh konam, yek lahze
fekr kardam dar felestin hastam; injA irAn nist..." Pakistani embassy has
called their students back. I don't know of Navid's whereabouts, but he
was saying he was going back to Pakistan never to return.

- A classmate of his has disappeard since last Thursday. He has not
phoned home; is not among the injured; basically, he's nowhere to be
found. His parents have searched everywhere... I don't know how they deal
with it.

- Two of their exams are left!!! They don't what will happen! Someone
says they'll be conducted tomorrow; someone says next week; someone says
in "mehr"; and for now the University is surrounded so no one can get in
anyway... the students don't know what they're supposed to do!



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Date: Thu, 15 Jul 1999 18:14:02 -0500
From: aryopirouznia <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: Iran/Reuters: Iran conservatives hold most levers of power

Iran conservatives hold most levers of power


TEHRAN, July 15 (Reuters) - The recent unrest in Iran was triggered by a
crackdown on pro-democracy students protesting at the closure of a leading
moderate daily, Salam, by a conservative-run court.

The dispute was widely seen as part of a power struggle between moderate
backers of President Mohammad Khatami and entrenched conservatives who
control most key levers of power.

The following is an overview of the power structure in Iran:

SUPREME LEADER - Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who succeeded the late
revolutionary
leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini in 1989, is seen to be close to
conservatives but often stands above factional disputes. Named for life by
the elected clerical Assembly of Experts, the leader has widespread powers
under the constitution and is the armed forces' commander-in-chief. He names
the heads of many bodies that report to him and can dismiss the president
after impeachment by parliament or the Supreme Court. The supreme leader can
theoretically be removed by the Assembly of Experts.

PRESIDENT - Khatami, a reformist, became president by defeating candidates
backed by the conservative clerical establishment in a May 1997 landslide.
Elected by popular vote of all Iranians aged 15 and above, the president
names the cabinet and heads the executive branch. But the government's
powers
are limited by the existence of many parallel bodies and a multiplicity of
decision centres. Khatami has sought to carry out his programme of social
and
political reforms within the framework of the Islamic system but has faced
strong opposition from conservatives and hardliners.

PARLIAMENT - Conservatives have a strong hold on the assembly, often getting
motions through thanks to support from independent deputies. A parliamentary
election is due in February, when reformists hope to wrest control of the
assembly. But they fear that many of their key candidates could be barred
from running, as in previous polls, by the Guardian Council.

GUARDIAN COUNCIL - A powerful conservative-run body which vets laws passed
by
parliament, screens election candidates and oversees polls. It consists of
six Shi'ite Moslem clerics named by the supreme leader and six Islamic
lawyers appointed by the parliament.

MILITARY - Pro-conservative commanders named by Ayatollah Khamenei are in
charge of the regular army (350,000 men including 250,000 conscripts), the
Revolutionary Guards (120,000), and the paramilitary Basij militia (about
500,000). But a large majority of the rank and file reportedly voted for
Khatami in 1997.

POLICE AND SECURITY AGENCIES - The police, the intelligence ministry and
other security bodies are traditionally run by hardliners, many of them
elite
veterans of the 1980-88 Iran-Iraq war. The services, part of the armed
forces, ultimately report to the supreme leader even though the intelligence
minister and the interior minister are both cabinet members.

JUDICIARY - Headed by a conservative named by the supreme leader. Iran has
general, military and revolutionary courts. A conservative-run special court
which deals with offences committed by clerics is independent of the
judiciary.

EXPEDIENCY DISCERNMENT COUNCIL - A powerful body headed by former President
Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani which advises the supreme leader, draws up
long-term
policies and arbitrates between parliament and the Guardian Council. The
council groups the heads of the three government powers, the six Guardian
Council clerics and some 25 other members named from various factions by the
supreme leader. It also has the power to adopt emergency laws over the head
of parliament.

FOUNDATIONS - Several state-affiliated foundations -- which control
extensive
resources including factories, hotels and transport agencies -- are run by
hardliners who are named by the supreme leader and report to him. These
bodies act independently of the government. The Foundation for the Deprived
and the War Disabled, set up after the 1979 revolution to oversee
confiscated
property, is Iran's largest economic conglomerate. The 15th of Khordad
Foundation, a clergy-run charity, has offered a $2.8 million reward for
anyone who kills British author Salman Rushdie, condemned to death in a 1989
religious decree by Ayatollah Khomeini for alleged blasphemy against Islam
in
his novel ``The Satanic Verses.''

RADIO and TELEVISION - The state broadcast media, headed by an official
named
by the supreme leader, are strongly pro-conservative.

NEWS AGENCY - The official Islamic Republic News Agency (IRNA), whose head
is
named by the government, usually sides with moderates as do the agency's
Farsi newspaper Iran and its English-language Iran Daily.

PRESS - Reformist newspapers, many of them launched under new liberal
regulations adopted under Khatami, dominate the press. In absence of
well-developed parties, the popular press has emerged as the key
battleground
for factional rivalry.

14:15 07-15-99

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 15 Jul 1999 18:15:52 -0500
From: aryopirouznia <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: Iran/Reuters: Tehran calm as officials reclaim control

Tehran calm as officials reclaim control

By Jonathan Lyons


TEHRAN, July 15 (Reuters) - Tehran University's hostels, hotbed of six days
of pro-democracy protests, were almost deserted on Thursday after security
forces reasserted control and vowed to hunt down those behind the violence.

About 150 students, most from out of town, remained behind amid the broken
glass and charred rooms from the protests and ensuing police attack that
touched off the worst unrest since the aftermath of the 1979 Islamic
revolution.

The students had called off their protests but were not dropping their
demands, including the sacking of the hardline police chief, a public trial
for two officers fired for ordering the attack and the release of the bodies
of dead classmates.

Students say scores were injured and at least five killed when police and
hardline vigilantes attacked a peaceful rally -- the trigger for days of
clashes between students and police. The authorities say only one died.

``Nothing is going to happen here at all, because we are still talking to
the
interior ministry about our demands,'' said one student, who declined to be
identified.

The intelligence ministry said it had detained a ``number of people'' over
the violent unrest. In a statement read on state media, it urged citizens to
report ``suspicious activities'' to special telephone numbers in Tehran and
provinces.

As protests heated up, many increasingly militant students began to
challenge
the Islamic leadership -- alarming other demonstrators and prompting
President Mohammad Khatami and other reformers to distance themselves from
the students.

Former President Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani said those guilty of sedition
during the riots in the capital on Tuesday would be dealt with firmly, but
with Islamic compassion.

``Definitely, the authorities will look at the guilty ones as sick people,
but they will be pursue it firmly and address it through educating the
people,'' he told state television. ``They will be looking to root out the
problem for some time.''

Rafsanjani, who now heads a powerful state body, blamed political
factionalism for contributing to the turmoil.

``This was a lesson for political currents to realise their limits so they
will not bite off more than they can chew,'' he said.

There was little sign of beefed-up security at the dormitory complex, and
traffic flowed normally. But special police units and plainclothes officers
could be seen in side streets.

Newspapers said the Revolutionary Guards and the Basij volunteer militia had
been put on full alert in Tehran province.

``The goal is not to interfere with the government's affairs but...to
preserve security,'' a Guards chief told Abrar daily.

He said Basij units, which are led by the Guards, had been deployed at
sensitive installations.

In a sign of renewed confidence, officials held the first day of the annual
university entrance examinations as scheduled, with 1.4 million hopefuls
taking part.

Education officials said the attack on the hostels had done at least $1.7
million in damage, not including the loss of students' personal property.

On Wednesday, Interior Minister Abdolvahed Mousavi-Lari said the security
forces had reined in the crisis, which culminated in running street battles
between protesters and security forces backed by hardline vigilantes armed
with clubs.

Hardline officials insisted there was no room for any group that challenged
the principle of clerical rule and vowed to punish those who had taken part
in the worst of the unrest.

Iran's biggest pro-Khatami student group said four of its members had been
beaten up and arrested for distributing posters of Khatami and a statement
on
the unrest.

On Wednesday tens of thousands of people had attended a rally in Tehran
called by the clerical establishment and backed by most moderate groups to
denounce the unrest.

Conservative media, led by the state broadcasting company, said millions had
taken part in official rallies across the country in support of the Islamic
system and clerical rule.

However, pro-reform newspapers -- which earlier rushed to distance
themselves
from the unrest lest they be tarred as radicals -- largely ignored the
official demonstrations.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 15 Jul 1999 20:05:31 EDT
From: KPGBT@AOL.COM
Subject: Fwd: Iranian leftists claim bloodshed part of coup bid against Khatami

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Date: Thu, 15 Jul 1999 09:50:20 -0700 (PDT)
From: Payman Arabshahi <payman@neda.com>
To: iran-news@arash.neda.com
Subject: Iranian leftists claim bloodshed part of coup bid against Khatami
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Iranian leftists claim bloodshed part of coup bid against Khatami

Saddam orders artists to build monument to POWs from Iran-Iraq war



--
Iranian leftists claim bloodshed part of coup bid against Khatami

TEHRAN, July 15 (AFP) - A leftist faction linked to Iranian
President Mohammad Khatami accused his opponents Thursday of
engineering the recent unrest in Tehran in a bid to topple him from
power in a "quiet coup."
"Since the formation of the Khatami government, certain groups
have made the destruction of his reform agenda their principal goal,
the Mujahedeen Organisation of the Islamic Revolution (MOIR) said in
a statement.
"Through orchestrated crises they want to make the Iranian
people regret going down the path of freedom, democracy and
political progress," said the statement, which was carried in
several reformist newspapers.
"They are creating the necessary conditions for a political and
military coup d'etat," MOIR said.
"Don't the recent events demonstrate that we are witnessing a
quiet coup, above all against the government of President Khatami
aimed at reversing the movement that began on May 23?" it asked,
referring to the 1997 date of his election.
"The closer we get to February's legislative elections, the more
these groups are stepping up their efforts to bring reform to a dead
end, and to postpone or cancel the elections," it said.
MOIR also suggested there was a link between those it claimed
had staged the violence and last year's string of assassinations of
writers and intellectuals, which the government has pinned on
intelligence agents.



--
Saddam orders artists to build monument to POWs from Iran-Iraq war

BAGHDAD, July 15 (AFP) - President Saddam Hussein has ordered a
monument to be built in honour of Iraqi prisoners from the 1980-1988
war against Iran, newspapers said Thursday.
Saddam decided on the project after hearing first-hand accounts
of the alleged torture which POWs, some of whom were held for as
long as 16 years, underwent at the hands of Iran.
"The president has given orders for artists to draw their
inspiration for the monument, to be erected in a Baghdad square,
from the accounts of the prisoners," the papers said.
He also condemned Iranian authorities "for the torture inflicted
on the prisoners and their attempts to play the confessional card"
as a way of dividing Shiite and Sunni Moslems among the POWs.
Eleven years after the end of their war, Iran says 2,806
prisoners are still being held in Iraq, a charge denied by Baghdad
which insists Tehran is keeping 20,000 of its soldiers as POWs.
More than 90,000 prisoners have so far been repatriated.



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