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There are 8 messages totalling 1007 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Detained Students in Iran
2. Third demonstration/IHRWG/NY/Aug 18
3. AP: Iran Prosecutes Israelis for Spying.
4. Reuters: Iran to put 13 Jews on trial soon -- Jewish group
5. Reuters: FOCUS-Japan lends to Iran, but less than planned.
6. Salon News: Encountering Iran on the cusp of change.
7. SMCCDI: Press Release of 8/17/1999: Urgent Action Required
8. abolishing anniversary holiday of oil nationalisation ??!!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Tue, 17 Aug 1999 11:00:11 -0306
From: Mehran Sam <msam@HMS.HARVARD.EDU>
Subject: Detained Students in Iran

Iran Daneshjoo Organization News Service - http://www.iran-daneshjoo.org

SMCCDI: Press Release
8/20/1999

Urgent Action Required

Detained Students and Human Rights Activists

The contradictory announcements from the officials of the Islamic Republic
Regime with respect to the fate of the arrested students and human rights
activists seems to point to a well coordinated and well orchestrated
campaign of mis-information and deceit by the Islamic Republic Regime to
create a division between the students and the people on the one hand; And
to set the stage for long imprisonments and possible executions of the
students and human rights activists on the other.

It is the moral duty of all the Iranian People , all over the World to
expose this ominous campaign and to voice their opposition to the
continuous campaign of terror by the Islamic Republic Regime.

Furthermore, we request from all Freedom Loving People of the World and
the Free World Leaders to follow the example of the International
Organizations as like as Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch and
specially the US Senators (Resolution of 8/04/1999) in condemning the
violations of the Human Rights in Iran and to impose the maximum pressure
on
The officials of the Islamic Republic Regime for the immediate and
unconditional release of all
Arrested students and political activists.

In closing, we're publishing a list of 154 detained Iranian Citizens and
we declare holding the
officials of the today's regime of Iran responsible for their safety and
freedom.

1) Abbas Karami
2) Abdolbaghi Kashani
3) Abol Fazl Olfat
4) Afshin Bagheri
5) Afshin Mehdi Zadeh
6) Afshin Tajian
7) Ahmad Ahmadi Khalaji
8) Ahmad Baghbi
9) Ahmad Darvish
10)Ahmad Tahmassebi
11) Ahmad Yadollahi
12) Akbar Mohamadi
13) Ali Hamidi
14) Ali Heydari
15) Ali Kalbassi
16) Ali Mehri
17) Ali Mohamadi
18) Ali Mozam
19) Ali Panahi
20) Ali Reza Mehrabian
21) Ali Reza Sheikh Mostafa i
22) Ali Sharif
23) Ali Tavakoli
24) Alireza Zamani
25) Amin Ali Poor
26) Amin Na-imi
27) Amir Reza Baghbanpoor
28) Amir Reza safdari
29) Amir Saeed Jahani
30) Amir Said Jahani
31) Amrollah Mir Ghasemi
32) Anahita Najafi
33) Arash Laridjani
34) Arman Tadj Bakhsh
35) Babak Payran
36) Bahram Namazi
37) Behieh Gilaani
38) Behrooz Ashtari Mohamad Soofi
39) Darioush Moradi
40) Darioush Ramezani
41) Davood Movahedi
42) Davoud Ahmadi Mounes (Armin)
43) Djavad Ghahremani
44) Eghbal Karimian
45) Elahe Ramezani
46) Elaheh Emir Entezam
47) Esmaeil Moftizadeh
48) Faramarz Beigi
49) Faramarz Jafari
50) Farhad Amin Khoram Loo
51) Farhad Khasti
52) Farima Kolahi
53) Farkhonde Sar Zadeh
54) Farshid Zarin Khat
55) Farzin Mokhber
56) Forough Bahmanpour
57) Ghassem Amin Khoram Loo
58) Gholam Reza Mohadjeri Nejad
59) Ghorban Ali Hadji
60) Golaleh Ahmadi
61) Hajir Farokh Tchi
62) Hajir Palatchi
63) Hamid Aghajani
64) Hamid Mansoori
65) Hamid Reza Zarifi Nia
66) Hamid Samandar
67) Hassan Zare Zadeh
68) Hooman Karbassi
69) Hooman Omrani
70) Hossein Ghadyani
71) Hossein Zahmatkash
72) Jalil Yekrangi
73) Javad Ghahremani
74) Kamelia Entekhabi-Fard
75) Kamran Alam Beigi
76) Kaveh Jaberi
77) Kazem Shokri
78) Khaled Rostam Zadeh Bookani
79) Khalil Alizadeh
80) Khosrow Seif
81) Kyanoosh Amin Poor
82) Kyanoosh Jahan Poor
83) Loghman Karbassi
84) Majid Deldar
85) Majid Maroot
86) Maloos Radnia (Mariam Shansy)
87) Mandana Arjomand
88) Manouchehr Mohamadi
89) Maryam Danaii Broomand
90) Maryam Taadi
91) Massod Mofidi Khame
92) Mazdak Kark Yaraghi
92) Mehdi Bazazadeh
93) Mehdi Eftekhar Zadeh
94) Mehdi Fakhr Zadeh
95) Mehdi Saghi Pirooz
96) Mehdi Zahed Ghavi
97) Mehran Abdolbaghi
98) Mehran Gorkani
99) Mehrnoosh Rostamian
100) Minoo Khadivar
101) Mir Mohamad Reza Heydari
102) Mir Reza Heydari
103) Mitra Ershadi
104) Mohamad Eghbal Kazerooni
105) Mohamad Esmail Naderi
106) Mohamad Hosseini
107) Mohamad Khobazan
108) Mohamad Massod Salamati
109) Mohamad Mehdi Shariati
110) Mohamad Mohamadi Ghomi
111) Mohamad Rashidi
112) Mohamad Reza Heydari
113) Mohamad Reza Karbassi
114) Mohamad Reza Nosrat
115) Mohammad Ghandi
116) Mohammad Majidi
117) Mohammad Moossavi
118) Mohammad Reza Kasraii
119) Mohammad Salary
120) Mohsen Nassiri Poor
121) Mohsen Rastegar
122) Mohsen Zarifian
123) Mohssen Abedi
124) Moossa Agha i
125) Morteza Hadadi
126) Mostafa Abdollahi
127) Nader Shokri
128) Nasser Babani Razeghi
129) Nima Sharifi
130) Oroodj Amiri
131) Parviz Safari
132) Peyman Roodje i
133) Razgar Ghaderpoor Eghdam
134) Reza Amidi
135) Reza Azzizi
136) Reza Derakhshande
137) Reza Sharifi
138) Rooz Beh Farahani Poor
139) Roozbeh Gordji Bayani
140) Roozbeh Ghader Poor Eghdam
141) Saeed Ahmadi
142) Saeed Balootchi
143) Safar Heidari
144) Said Rassoolian
145) Samad Mousavi
146) Seyed Djavad Emami
147) Seyed Mohamad Hosseini
148) Shaban Ansari
149) Shahram Asghar Nia
150) Shirin Shah Hosseini
151) Sima Ashna
152) Youssef Bijari
153) Youssef Reza i
154) Zohre Assad Poor


The Student Movement Coordination Committee for Democracy in Iran.
www.iran-daneshjoo.org


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------------------------------

Date: Tue, 17 Aug 1999 21:51:31 EDT
From: KPGBT@AOL.COM
Subject: Third demonstration/IHRWG/NY/Aug 18

SalAm doostan,

IHRWG held its first demonstration in New York in front of the Iranian
mission to UN on August 4, 1999. 40 people attended this event. The second
event was also attended by almost 25 people. IHRWG is holding the third
demonstration on August 18 on 622 3rd Avenue
[between 40th and 41st street]. This is in support of Human rights in Iran
and in protest of the recent wave of arrests. IHRWG will continue the
demonsrations until its demands are met.



regards
Kourosh Parsa
732-728-9627

******************************************************************************
C A L L F O R P A R T I C I P A T I O N

Vigils in support of HR in Iran


The Iranian Human Rights Working Group (IHRWG) is calling on all
concerned groups and individuals to participate in a weekly vigil
in support of the fundamental human rights of the Iranian people.
Human Rights violations in Iran have intensified following the
peaceful demonstration of students demanding freedom of press
among other things.

The IHRWG is gravely concerned about the treatment of detainees,
as there are strong indications that a number of student leaders were
tortured in an effort to extract false confessions out of them.
Moreover, the IHRWG believes that the lives of many of the people
arrested are in danger, as senior government officials have called
for them to be tried on charges of "corruption on earth" and
"fighting God", both of which carry the death penalty.

The IHRWG calls for the weekly vigils to be held in front of the
IRI Mission to the UN (622 Third Ave. between 40th and 41st streets)
from 4:00 to 7:00 PM every Wednesday, until the following demands
have been met by the Iranian government.

The IHRWG demands:

1 - a. The unconditional release of all of those who have been arbitrarily
arrested;

b. open and fair trials for all of those arrested activists who have
been charged with any criminal acts.

2 - a. A thorough investigation (conforming with international human rights
standards) into the attack on student dormitories at Tehran University
on July 8 which resulted in deaths, injuries, and arrests of
the students;

b. the public disclosure of the results of above investigation, including
release of the number and names of all those killed and detained all
over Iran;

c. that those responsible for these attacks be brought to justice in
open and fair trials.

3 - The unconditional return of the bodies of all those killed in the
recent unrests to their families.

4 - a. The full disclosure of the results of the investigations into the
killing of dissidents (Forouhar, Eskandari-Forouhar, Mokhtari,
Pouyandeh and Sharif) by agents of the Ministry of Intelligence;

b. the full disclosure of the number, names and rank of the agents
who have been under investigation in relation to those killings;

c. open and fair trial of the agents involved in those killings.

5 - Control and dismantling of paramilitary and extra judiciary groups
who have been terrorizing the public.

We also remind the IRI of its obligations, as a signatory, to respect
the provisions of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR),
which include the right to life, freedom from torture, cruel and
inhumane and degrading punishment, and freedom of opinion and
expression.

We ask you to show your support for human rights in Iran by simply
gathering in front of the IRI mission to UN at the above address
for three hours a week. Banners and slogans will be restricted
to the above demands and support of human rights in general.

Iranian Human Rights Working Group
http://www.ihrwg.org

IHRWG
P.O. Box 2422
Portland, OR. 97208
USA.

For more information on the vigils, call (732) 728-9627.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 17 Aug 1999 21:13:36 -0500
From: aryopirouznia <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: AP: Iran Prosecutes Israelis for Spying.

http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/19990817/wl/iranian_jews_2.html

Tuesday August 17 2:24 PM ET

Iran Prosecutes Israelis for Spying
By BARRY SCHWEID AP Diplomatic Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) - Iranian authorities have decided to proceed with trial of
13 Jews on charges of spying for Israel, an official of a leading American
Jewish organization said Tuesday.

Prosecutors will take that move Thursday, said Malcolm Hoenlein, executive
director of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish
Organizations.

The 13, in custody since their March arrests, were ``absolutely innocent,''
Hoenlein said as he appealed to Iranian justice to return them to their
families. He said his information came from ``official sources,'' whom he
declined to identify.

In Jerusalem, Israel's Chief Sephardic rabbi, Eliahu Bakshi-Doron, asked for
prayers for the safety of the Jews. He said their trial was to begin
Wednesday.

State Department spokesman James P. Rubin said he had no information about
the reported trial, noting that there is no U.S. Embassy in Tehran.

Iran has denounced the United States for objecting to the arrests, saying no
country had a right to interfere in Iran's internal affairs.

The State Department has criticized the charges as unfounded and
unacceptable. Jesse Jackson also has appealed for their release.

Espionage is a capital crime in Iran, a nation of 60 million people, many of
them Shiite Muslims.

Iran has executed 17 Jews on espionage charges in the past two decades,
including two in 1997.

Iran had a long history of tolerance toward Jews, through the reign of the
shah. About 200,000 were living in the country when Islamic revolutionaries
overthrew the Peacock throne in 1979.

All but about 25,000 Jews fled. Those who remained were allowed to practice
aspects of their religion but are forbidden to teach Hebrew and they face
restrictions on emigration.

On Monday, a former member of the Jewish community of Mashad who now lives
in Israel reported that bulldozers had uprooted the headstones at the Jewish
cemetery in the Iranian city, 450 miles east of Tehran.

``They didn't leave a single grave,'' Moshe Zvulini said.

The 13 Jews detained are from Shiraz and include at least one rabbi and
several teachers.

The Iranian government daily Jomhouri Eslami said they were accused of
having ``set up an espionage network in Iran for gathering ... intelligence
from sources inside some of Iran's state organs ... (which) were then passed
on to Mossad (Israel's intelligence agency).

The case's outcome could reveal the extent of the moderation that the
Clinton administration said it saw in the election of President Mohammad
Khatami two years ago.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 17 Aug 1999 21:13:51 -0500
From: aryopirouznia <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: Reuters: Iran to put 13 Jews on trial soon -- Jewish group

http://infoseek.go.com/Content?arn=a3323LBY374reulb-19990817&qt=Iran&sv=IS&l
k=&col=NX&kt=A&ak=news1486

Iran to put 13 Jews on trial soon -- Jewish group
06:18 p.m Aug 17, 1999 Eastern

LOS ANGELES, August 17 (Reuters) - Iran plans to put 13 Jews on trial this
week on charges of spying for Israel despite concerns voiced by the Vatican
and the International Red Cross, a Jewish group said on Tuesday.

The World Jewish Congress said that it had learned through Iranian sources
that the 13, mostly rabbis and Hebrew teachers ranging in age from 16 to 48,
would go on trial on Thursday. They were arrested in Shiraz earlier this
year.

Further details on the trial were not immediately available.

Governments and humanitarian groups have been concerned over the fate of the
13 and both Israel and the United States have denied any connection with
them.

``We are appealing for their release as they are absolutely innocent of
these charges,'' Elan Steinberg, executive director of the WJC, said.

Steinberg added that the president of the International Red Cross had
written the WJC to say that the matter was raised with Iranian authorities
in June in Geneva but that because of the Red Cross's policy of
confidentiality, no comment could be made on the details of the discussions.

In June, the Vatican called arrest of the 13 a ``matter of concern for those
dedicated to human rights.''

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 17 Aug 1999 21:14:04 -0500
From: aryopirouznia <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: Reuters: FOCUS-Japan lends to Iran, but less than planned.

http://infoseek.go.com/Content?arn=a2466LBY254reulb-19990817&qt=Iran&sv=IS&l
k=lcd&col=NX&kt=A&ak=news1486


FOCUS-Japan lends to Iran, but less than planned
02:50 p.m Aug 17, 1999 Eastern
By Ali Raiss-Tousi

TEHRAN, Aug 17 (Reuters) - Japan has agreed to lift a six-year freeze on
loans to Iran and to expand its political dialogue with the government of
moderate President Mohammad Khatami, a Japanese Foreign Ministry spokesman
said on Tuesday.

Yasuhisa Kawamura said Japan agreed to make a loan of 7.5 billion yen ($65.8
million) to help complete a hydroelectric dam on Iran's Karun river. The
loan was sharply lower than had been planned at the start of the project in
the early 1990s.

Speaking after talks between Japanese Foreign Minister Masahiko Komura and
his Iranian counterpart Kamal Kharrazi, Kawamura told reporters the two
countries had agreed that the sum would ``wrap up'' Japan's participation in
the project.

Japan had given Iran 38.6 billion yen in 1993 as the first allotment of a
loan originally set at a total 150 billion yen. Japanese press reports had
said the second tranche would be up to 40 billion yen, to be followed by
further payments.

After the 1993 payment, Japan followed the United States in tightening
economic sanctions against Iran. Tokyo has resumed high-level dialogue with
Tehran since Khatami's 1997 election.

Kawamura said Japan had invited Khatami to visit Tokyo next year to
``strengthen the bilateral political dialogue.''

Komura and Kharrazi were likely to discuss Iran's relations with North Korea
at a meeting late on Tuesday, he said.

Japanese media have reported that Komura was expected to bring up Iran's
suspected close relationship with North Korea. Iran established relations
with Pyongyang in 1973.

Japan has stepped up diplomatic efforts to urge the international community
to dissuade North Korea from testing a long-range missile.

Iran itself test-fired a medium-range missile last year. Western experts
said the missile was based on North Korean technology, but Tehran said it
was built without foreign help.

In a meeting with Komura on Tuesday, Khatami rejected U.S. charges that Iran
was developing weapons of mass destruction.

``Our defence budget is less than that of all the regional states and, as
far as atomic energy is concerned, Iran's activity is under the full
supervision of the International Atomic Energy Agency,'' the Iranian news
agency IRNA quoted Khatami as saying.

Kawamura said Kharrazi had called on Japan to cooperate with Iran in a
five-year development plan which starts in March 2000.

``Komura promised to study more deeply and thoroughly Iran's development
problems,'' Kawamura said.

``But Japan wants more private-sector activity in Iran and an improvement of
the business atmosphere in the country, for example with regards to taxes,''
Kawamura said.

He was apparently referring to reports that Iranian officials were taking
measures which could strongly increase taxes to be paid by foreign firms.

Kawamura said it was unclear if Komura's visit to Turkey, scheduled before
the earthquake in western Turkey early on Tuesday, would go ahead.

($1-114.20 Yen)

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 17 Aug 1999 21:14:20 -0500
From: aryopirouznia <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: Salon News: Encountering Iran on the cusp of change.

http://www.salon.com/travel/feature/1999/08/11/iran/index.html


+++Total eclipse
++++Encountering Iran on the cusp of change.


Salon News
By Jeff Greenwald


August 11, 1999

Thirty minutes before Lufthansa flight 600 landed in Tehran, an odd
transformation took place. As if on cue, the four or five dozen women in the
cabin -- women who had left Frankfurt in tank tops, halters or blouses and
skirts -- rose from their seats and pulled plastic bags from the overhead
bins. Each bag contained the same two items: a broad black scarf, called a
"rusari," and an oversized trench coat. By the time we buckled in for
landing, every passenger of the female persuasion (girls under 9 excepted)
had covered her hair and skin completely, leaving only her face showing.

This sudden reverse metamorphosis -- from butterflies back to cocoons -- was
so striking that I almost laughed. The change was especially dramatic in the
woman sitting next to me, Sophia, an Iranian by birth who had been living in
Hawaii for two years. Sophia's manner, so lively and playful during the
five-hour flight, now took on a somber and wary mien. She was doing
something she hated, to please someone else: Someone who could not be
pleased.

Naturally, I was fascinated. Everything about Iran fascinates me. I've
attempted to visit this country twice; twice my visa application was
rejected. This time, I applied as part of a small group arranged by San
Francisco's Geographic Expeditions. Our chief purpose is to observe the last
total solar eclipse of the millennium, which will throw a giant shadow
across south Europe, Turkey, Romania, Iran and north India Wednesday.
Weather permitting, we will witness totality in Esfahan -- the legendary
city that was the jewel of 16th and 17th century Persia.


I've never seen an eclipse before, and I've never been in Iran before, so
the trip seems a good opportunity to experience two legendary states of
darkness. Not that I personally think of Iran as a dark place -- on the
contrary, I associate it with Rumi, Omar Khayyam and the great Persian poet
Hafiz. But let's not kid ourselves. Since 1979, Iran has been an Islamic
republic under the strict supervision of stern-faced ayatollahs, and the
official line is invariably a rhapsody on the theme of Great Satan.

These days, though, we're more of a bite-size Satan. For Iran, like much of
the developing world, is awash in contradictions. This has been immediately
apparent in everything I've encountered here -- starting with the women on
the plane. Like much of Iranian society, they seem to be living with their
heart in one place and their hand in another, pulled between the poles of
enthusiasm for the new and fear of the old. As Sophia said to me before we
parted: "Of course we hope things will change. But I doubt they ever will."
Saying this, she bundled up her trench coat and stepped outside -- into
107-degree heat.

This social ambivalence became even more apparent after we deplaned. Our
eight-member group was met by emissaries and herded into a lavish waiting
area filled with comfortable couches, mirrored tile and skittering woodwork.
This was, a brass sign proclaimed, the "CIP" lounge.

"CIP?" I looked quizzically at Sanjay Saxena, our Delhi-born expedition
leader. "Shouldn't it be VIP?"

"No," he replied drolly. "As far as Iran's concerned, we're CIPs:
Commercially Important Persons."

We would wait there some minutes, we were told, while our luggage passed
through customs. In fact, it was two hours. During the interval, we were fed
strong tea and served small, creamy cakes. An elderly man with a white
moustache took pains to put us at ease. He offered a newspaper -- the Iran
Daily -- which I greedily opened. Atop Page 3, I spied a short column called
"Let's Memorize the Quran."

"Good idea," I thought to myself. I was genuinely intrigued; I know
virtually nothing of the Koran (as Westerners prefer to spell it), and was
grateful for the opportunity to increase my knowledge. The passage, I noted,
was from Sura 5, 51:


O you who believe! Do not take the Jews and the Christians for friends; they
are friends of each other; and whoever amongst you takes them for a friend,
then surely he is one of them; surely Allah does not guide the unjust
people.

Whoops. I turned quickly to another page, and scanned a more hopeful story:


Iran Lifts Ban on Western Musical Instruments

TEHRAN (Reuters) -- Iran has lifted a two-decade ban on the import of
Western musical instruments, which it has long seen as decadent and corrupt,
a newspaper said on Wednesday. The moderate Iran newspaper said a state
organization affiliated with the culture ministry had given the green light
for the import of ... flutes, pianos, classical guitars, harps, drums,
saxophones and organs.


I was pleased to see that the ban on accordions remains in effect.

Just below, I spied this unlikely headline:


African Queen Plies Michigan Waters

BAY CITY, MICH. (AP) -- The boat that once carted Humphrey Bogart and
Katharine Hepburn around on the silver screen is plying Michigan waters. The
African Queen, from the movie of the same name, will offer rides on the
Saginaw River as a fund-raiser for the Saginaw Valley Naval Ship Museum
Committee ...


My reading was interrupted by two customs guards, who approached a member of
our group with apologetic smiles. The officers muttered something to Ali,
our local guide, who translated for our unfortunate companion.

"The agents wish to inform you that they found a bottle of Absolut Citron in
your luggage. They invite you to watch them pouring it into the toilet, to
assure yourself they are not stealing it."

"No problem." His eyes lit up. "Can I take a picture?"

This was a stroke of genius. I could already envision the billboard, easily
visible on the Bay Bridge approach into San Francisco: "Absolut Islam."
Predictably, however, the answer was no.

Most of us have read or heard the recent reports of student riots in Tehran,
the worst since the fundamentalist revolution that installed the late
Ayatollah Khomeini 20 years ago. The students were protesting the closure of
a liberal newspaper, Salam (which means "hello," or "howdy"). The newspaper
was not publishing op-ed pieces urging men to run out and rent "Basic
Instinct," or inciting women to storm the segregated swimming pools. The
publisher was merely supporting the agenda of Iran's reformist president,
Muhammad Ali Khatami, who has excited the popular imagination with his
policies favoring personal privacy and a more lenient interpretation of
Islamic law. Khatami himself is a former journalist. But the unfortunate
truth is that, though he was elected with 40 percent of the vote, Khatami
has little real power. It might help to imagine him as the head of a small
medieval fiefdom, promising to reform the will of a pope.

Be that as it may, it was a shock to walk down the streets of Tehran on
Friday -- the Muslim Sabbath -- and feel no sense of threat or menace at
all. Everyone I met was helpful and hospitable, and quite willing to talk
about Iran-America relations -- within limits. Even my taxi driver, who
spoke perhaps 10 words of English, pumped my hand when he heard where I was
from.

"Oh, America! Very good! JFK, very good!" Then he frowned, and with his
right palm pantomimed an airplane nose-diving into a turbulent sea. We
mourned together in silence.


I then ventured, "What about Bill Clinton?"

"Very good, very good!"

"George Bush?"

"Very good!"

"Ronald Reagan?"

"Sorry ..." he shrugged. "No English."

I spent much of the day just strolling around. There isn't much to see in
Tehran -- the museums are about the only things open on Friday -- but it's a
good day for protests, and I was hoping to run into some kind of trouble. No
such luck. The closest I came was outside the defunct American Embassy (now
a military training school), where I tried to photograph a gaily lettered
mural saying, "Down With U.S.A." A guard politely hurried me along. It's a
good thing he did, or I probably would have missed all the other
anti-American murals along the side of the building. I was especially moved
by one plaintive message, illustrated by a scowling Khomeini: "On the Day
the U.S. Praises Us We Should Mourn."

I did manage to pick up a bit of the flavor of the place, and when it's all
said and done -- once you've seen Salam Nuts (which I filed away in my file
of great band names), Peoples' Park and a few kids hanging freshly baked
bread on the fences -- the one thing that sticks in my mind is the movie
posters. Think about it: How many films in developing countries, from
Cambodia to Mexico to India, rely on the thinly disguised charms of a buxom
love interest? In Iran, of course, you see nothing of the sort. The women
wear rusaris, even in the movies. This leaves little with which to inveigle
the typical male viewer, so the same formula is repeated time and again. The
six or seven films I saw advertised showed remarkably similar images: a
single man poised heroically against an unseen obstacle, as a
helpless-looking woman cowered beneath her scarf.

Come to think of it, maybe it was the same movie.

I dined alone, typing up my notes in an ill-lit kebab salon as my fellow
travelers painted the town. As I sat at my lonely table, a group of handsome
Iranian men approached me. They were burdened with heavy gear: lights,
cameras, cables.

"Excuse me, sir." Those three simple words, ever concealing a hidden agenda!

"How may I help you?" I was overly keen, owing to my fascination with the
film posters.

"We are with Iranian International Television. We would like to make a film
here, of you working on your computer. For the TV. It will show that
Americans are welcome in Iran. May we shoot you?"

"Why, yes," I replied. "I'm touched. No one has offered to shoot me all
day."

The producer smiled, and signaled to his crew. "Just one thing, though," I
amended.

"Please?"

"No close-ups of the screen."

- - - - - - - - - - - -

Dropping into bed, jet-lagged to the point where a toothbrush weighs eight
pounds, I finally noticed it: the golden arrow on my hotel room ceiling. It
was, inexplicably, a comfort to me. I shifted my pillow a bit, and slept
with my head pointing toward Mecca.
salon.com | August 11, 1999



- - - - - - - - - - - -

About the writer
Jeff Greenwald will be sending more dispatches from Iran later this week.
His most recent book, "Future Perfect: How 'Star Trek' Conquered Planet
Earth," was just released in paperback by Penguin.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 17 Aug 1999 21:17:14 -0500
From: aryopirouznia <aryopirouznia@EMAIL.MSN.COM>
Subject: SMCCDI: Press Release of 8/17/1999: Urgent Action Required

SMCCDI: Press Release
8/17/1999

Urgent Action Required

Detained Students and Human Rights Activists

The contradictory announcements arrested from the officials of the Islamic
Republic Regime with respect to the fate of the students and human rights
activists seems to point to a well coordinated and well orchestrated
campaign of mis-information and deceit by the Islamic Republic Regime to
create a division between the students and the people on the one hand; And
to set the stage for long imprisonments and possible executions of the
students and human rights activists on the other.

It is the moral duty of all the Iranian People , all over the World to
expose this ominous campaign and to voice their opposition to the
continuous campaign of terror by the Islamic Republic Regime.

Furthermore, we request from all Freedom Loving People of the World and
the Free World Leaders to follow the example of the International
Organizations as like as Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch and
specially the US Senators (Resolution of 8/04/1999) in condemning the
violations of the Human Rights in Iran and to impose the maximum pressure
on
The officials of the Islamic Republic Regime for the immediate and
unconditional release of all
Arrested students and political activists.

In closing, we're publishing a list of 154 detained Iranian Citizens and
we declare holding the
officials of the today's regime of Iran responsible for their safety and
freedom.

1) Abbas Karami
2) Abdolbaghi Kashani
3) Abol Fazl Olfat
4) Afshin Bagheri
5) Afshin Mehdi Zadeh
6) Afshin Tajian
7) Ahmad Ahmadi Khalaji
8) Ahmad Baghbi
9) Ahmad Darvish
10)Ahmad Tahmassebi
11) Ahmad Yadollahi
12) Akbar Mohamadi
13) Ali Hamidi
14) Ali Heydari
15) Ali Kalbassi
16) Ali Mehri
17) Ali Mohamadi
18) Ali Mozam
19) Ali Panahi
20) Ali Reza Mehrabian
21) Ali Reza Sheikh Mostafa i
22) Ali Sharif
23) Ali Tavakoli
24) Alireza Zamani
25) Amin Ali Poor
26) Amin Na-imi
27) Amir Reza Baghbanpoor
28) Amir Reza safdari
29) Amir Saeed Jahani
30) Amir Said Jahani
31) Amrollah Mir Ghasemi
32) Anahita Najafi
33) Arash Laridjani
34) Arman Tadj Bakhsh
35) Babak Payran
36) Bahram Namazi
37) Behieh Gilaani
38) Behrooz Ashtari Mohamad Soofi
39) Darioush Moradi
40) Darioush Ramezani
41) Davood Movahedi
42) Davoud Ahmadi Mounes (Armin)
43) Djavad Ghahremani
44) Eghbal Karimian
45) Elahe Ramezani
46) Elaheh Emir Entezam
47) Esmaeil Moftizadeh
48) Faramarz Beigi
49) Faramarz Jafari
50) Farhad Amin Khoram Loo
51) Farhad Khasti
52) Farima Kolahi
53) Farkhonde Sar Zadeh
54) Farshid Zarin Khat
55) Farzin Mokhber
56) Forough Bahmanpour
57) Ghassem Amin Khoram Loo
58) Gholam Reza Mohadjeri Nejad
59) Ghorban Ali Hadji
60) Golaleh Ahmadi
61) Hajir Farokh Tchi
62) Hajir Palatchi
63) Hamid Aghajani
64) Hamid Mansoori
65) Hamid Reza Zarifi Nia
66) Hamid Samandar
67) Hassan Zare Zadeh
68) Hooman Karbassi
69) Hooman Omrani
70) Hossein Ghadyani
71) Hossein Zahmatkash
72) Jalil Yekrangi
73) Javad Ghahremani
74) Kamelia Entekhabi-Fard
75) Kamran Alam Beigi
76) Kaveh Jaberi
77) Kazem Shokri
78) Khaled Rostam Zadeh Bookani
79) Khalil Alizadeh
80) Khosrow Seif
81) Kyanoosh Amin Poor
82) Kyanoosh Jahan Poor
83) Loghman Karbassi
84) Majid Deldar
85) Majid Maroot
86) Maloos Radnia (Mariam Shansy)
87) Mandana Arjomand
88) Manouchehr Mohamadi
89) Maryam Danaii Broomand
90) Maryam Taadi
91) Massod Mofidi Khame
92) Mazdak Kark Yaraghi
92) Mehdi Bazazadeh
93) Mehdi Eftekhar Zadeh
94) Mehdi Fakhr Zadeh
95) Mehdi Saghi Pirooz
96) Mehdi Zahed Ghavi
97) Mehran Abdolbaghi
98) Mehran Gorkani
99) Mehrnoosh Rostamian
100) Minoo Khadivar
101) Mir Mohamad Reza Heydari
102) Mir Reza Heydari
103) Mitra Ershadi
104) Mohamad Eghbal Kazerooni
105) Mohamad Esmail Naderi
106) Mohamad Hosseini
107) Mohamad Khobazan
108) Mohamad Massod Salamati
109) Mohamad Mehdi Shariati
110) Mohamad Mohamadi Ghomi
111) Mohamad Rashidi
112) Mohamad Reza Heydari
113) Mohamad Reza Karbassi
114) Mohamad Reza Nosrat
115) Mohammad Ghandi
116) Mohammad Majidi
117) Mohammad Moossavi
118) Mohammad Reza Kasraii
119) Mohammad Salary
120) Mohsen Nassiri Poor
121) Mohsen Rastegar
122) Mohsen Zarifian
123) Mohssen Abedi
124) Moossa Agha i
125) Morteza Hadadi
126) Mostafa Abdollahi
127) Nader Shokri
128) Nasser Babani Razeghi
129) Nima Sharifi
130) Oroodj Amiri
131) Parviz Safari
132) Peyman Roodje i
133) Razgar Ghaderpoor Eghdam
134) Reza Amidi
135) Reza Azzizi
136) Reza Derakhshande
137) Reza Sharifi
138) Rooz Beh Farahani Poor
139) Roozbeh Gordji Bayani
140) Roozbeh Ghader Poor Eghdam
141) Saeed Ahmadi
142) Saeed Balootchi
143) Safar Heidari
144) Said Rassoolian
145) Samad Mousavi
146) Seyed Djavad Emami
147) Seyed Mohamad Hosseini
148) Shaban Ansari
149) Shahram Asghar Nia
150) Shirin Shah Hosseini
151) Sima Ashna
152) Youssef Bijari
153) Youssef Reza i
154) Zohre Assad Poor


The Student Movement Coordination Committee for Democracy in Iran.
www.iran-daneshjoo.org

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 17 Aug 1999 22:57:47 -0400
From: "by way of Farhad Abdolian <farhad@algonet.se>" <akhbar@2XTREME.NET>
Subject: abolishing anniversary holiday of oil nationalisation ??!!

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Siahkal News
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TEHRAN, Aug 16 (AFP) - The Iranian parliament approved Monday a bill
abolishing the annual public holiday marking the anniversary of Tehran's
nationalisation of the oil industry in 1951.
The move to scrap the March 19 holiday, which celebrated the end of British
colonial influence over Iran, immediately provoked indignation among
nationalist circles.
The pro-government Ettelaat paper described it as "an insult to the people
of Iran and their anti-colonial struggle."
The holiday had existed for nearly 50 years, since nationalist prime minister
Mohammad Mossadegh wrested control of the country's oil resources from
Britain
after a long struggle.
Relations with Britain, which had been strained for 10 years, have improved
recently, after the Iranian government undertook not to try to implement the
death sentence against British writer Salman Rushdie pronounced by Iran's
former
spiritual leader, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini. The two sides exchanged
ambassadors in May.
Celebrations of the oil nationalisation anniversary had fallen somewhat
into abeyance for many years, partly because it coincides with the eve of
the Iranian new year. The new year is already a major holiday in the country.
Parliament authorised the government to declare a new holiday on September
14,
the anniversary of the death of Fatimah, the daughter of the Prophet Mohammad.
It also approved government plans to declare public holidays on anniversaries
of important dates in the 1979 Islamic revolution.

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Siahkal News
This message is sent in compliance with the new email bill section 301.
Per Section 301, Paragraph (a)(2)(C) of S. 1618, further transmissions
to you by the sender of this email may be stopped at no cost to you.
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------------------------------

End of DNI-NEWS Digest - 16 Aug 1999 to 17 Aug 1999
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